ICBC and police ask drivers to leave their phone alone

ICBC and police ask drivers to leave their phone alone

More than one in four fatal crashes on B.C. roads involve distracted driving, which is why police and ICBC continue to combat this dangerous driving behaviour that claims 76 lives each year.*

Since B.C.’s distracted driving law came into effect in January 2010, more than 430,000 infractions have been issued to drivers for using an electronic device while driving. Some drivers didn’t get the message the first time, as between January 2010 and March 2020:

  • 44,000 drivers have received two tickets for distracted driving

  • 12,000 have received three tickets

  • 4,200 have received four tickets

  • 65 drivers have received 10 tickets

This month, drivers will be hearing one message – leave your phone alone when you’re behind the wheel.

Police across B.C. are ramping up distracted driving enforcement during September, and community volunteers are setting up Cell Watch deployments to remind drivers to leave their phone alone. The campaign also features new digital and radio advertising.

Drivers can do their part by avoiding distractions while driving and encouraging others to do the same. Activate Apple’s Do Not Disturb While Driving feature or what’s similarly available on other devices.

You can get tips and statistics in an infographic at icbc.com.

Quotes:

Chief Constable Neil Dubord, Chair of the BC Association of Chiefs of Police Traffic Safety Committee

“Distracted driving continues to be the number one cause of police-reported crashes in British Columbia. If your eyes aren’t on the road, and you are not fully focused on driving, you are distracted. Every second counts when you are behind the wheel, and being distracted for just a second could be the difference between life and death. Police are passionate about making our roads safer, and the distracted driving campaign is an excellent way to educate the community on the risks associated with distracted driving.”

Lindsay Matthews, ICBC’s Vice-President Public Affairs & Driver Licensing

“Using electronic devices, like smartphones, is one of the most common and riskiest forms of distracted driving. Even short glances away from the road increases your risk of crashing. Safer roads start with every driver making a conscious decision to focus on the road and leave their phones alone. Let’s all do our part to create a safer driving culture in B.C.”

Regional statistics*:

  • Every year, on average, 26 people are killed in distracted driving-related crashes in the Lower Mainland.

  • Every year, on average, nine people are killed in distracted driving-related crashes on Vancouver Island.

  • Every year, on average, 29 people are killed in distracted driving-related crashes in the Southern Interior.

  • Every year, on average, 12 people are killed in distracted driving-related crashes in the North Central region.

*Police data from 2014 to 2018. Distraction: where one or more of the vehicles involved had contributing factors including use of communication/video equipment, driver inattentive and driver internal/external distraction.

SGI – Speeding in the #OrangeZone is seriously concerning

SGI – Speeding in the #OrangeZone is seriously concerning

There’s an old joke that there are only two seasons in Saskatchewan; winter and road construction. But law enforcement weren’t joking around when they wrote 224 tickets for violations in work zones in July.

Disobeying speed limits in highway construction zones is a serious concern. Passing highway workers — or highway equipment with its warning lights flashing — in a marked construction zone means drivers are required to slow to 60 km/h or the posted speed limit. For July, police across Saskatchewan reported:

  • 195 tickets were issued for exceeding 60 km/h when passing highway workers or occupied highway equipment within a work zone,
  • 15 tickets were issued for exceeding 60 km/h when passing a highway worker or flag person,
  • 2 tickets for exceeding 60 km/h when passing occupied highway equipment,
  • 4 tickets for exceeding 60 km/h when passing highway equipment with warning lights in operation, and
  • 8 tickets for failing to obey the directions of a flag person.

The July Traffic Safety Spotlight focused on providing a safe working environment for the people who build and fix our roads.  Watch this video with Shantel Lipp of the Saskatchewan Heavy Construction Association where she explains the perils faced by construction workers from speeding and reckless drivers.

Summer is not over, and neither is construction season. Speeding through construction zones results in extra-expensive tickets (driving 100 km/h in a 60 km/h orange zone will cost the offender $1,008), so when you #SeeOrangeSlowDown and use the few extra moments of your journey to think about all the things you can do with the money you didn’t have to spend on a ticket.

Law enforcement also reported the following results in July:

  • 7,333 other aggressive driving or speeding offences;
  • 798 distracted driving offences, including 684 for cellphone use while driving; and
  • 609 seatbelt and child restraint offences. (If you’re not wearing a seatbelt, you greatly increase your risk of being ejected like this — and seriously hurt or killed — in a collision.

Police also reported 474 impaired driving offences in July, including 382 Criminal Code offences.While impaired driving collisions, injuries and fatalities in Saskatchewan have declined over the past decade, the fight against impaired driving is not over, and enforcement remains very strong.  SGI and law enforcement continue to focus on impaired driving with the August Traffic Safety Spotlight. However you choose to enjoy the final days of summer, always ensure you make a plan for a safe ride home.

Join SGI on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram where the discussion will continue with Saskatchewan drivers who want to #DriveSober.

www.sgi.sk.ca / www.sgicanada.ca

 

Some temporary COVID-19 support measures to expire

August 7, 2020

With Phase 3 of B.C.’s Restart Plan progressing and more British Columbians returning to B.C.’s roads and highways, three of the temporary measures ICBC had introduced in response to the COVID-19 pandemic are now set to expire in the coming weeks.

The B.C. Utilities Commission had approved ICBC implementing the following measures starting April 23 and ending on August 20:

  • waiving of the $30 insurance cancellation charge

  • suspension of fleet vehicle insurance

  • allowance of unlimited deliveries by drivers in non-delivery rate classes

Private passenger vehicles continue to have up to six days per month for delivery use.

Customers are now reinsuring their vehicles at higher than historic levels. Since April 23, 2020, a total of 300,000 new plate policies have been issued for non-fleet customers compared with the approximately 120,000 non-fleet customers who cancelled their insurance policies for the same time period.

As these measures come to an end on August 20, customers are encouraged to talk to their broker to ensure they are properly insured, including those people who are using their vehicle for the delivery of food or medical products and services.

The following measures remain in place at this time, as outlined in regulation:

  • waiving of the $18 re-plating fee

  • waiving of the first knowledge test fee for learner driver’s licence holders whose licence expired during the pandemic

Customers can continue to renew their insurance by phone and email with the help of brokers, and those who are facing financial hardship and who pay for their insurance on a monthly basis still have the ability to defer their payments for up to 90 days with no penalty.

ICBC continues to review its operations to support the safety and well-being of its customers and employees as normal business resumes.

Police focus on impaired drivers for August Traffic Safety Spotlight

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​ICBC & police warn impaired drivers ahead of long weekend

​ICBC & police warn impaired drivers ahead of long weekend

This B.C. Day long weekend, our roads will be busy with some British Columbians choosing to travel throughout the province for a getaway and others visiting local parks and restaurants. No matter what your plans are, if you plan to drink, don’t drive.

Police will be setting up CounterAttack roadchecks across the province to get impaired drivers off our roads. If you’re caught driving impaired, you could end up paying in a number of lasting ways – from increased insurance premiums to fines, car impoundment or even jail time.

On average, four people are killed and 620 people injured in 2,200 crashes across the province over the B.C. long weekend.*

5 ways to stay safe on your road trip:

  1. If you’re away from home, you may not be familiar with all of the options available to get home safely after you’ve had a few drinks. Check your options such as taxis, ride sharing, transit or shuttle services before you head out and save the information into your cell phone so you can relax knowing you have a plan to get home safely.

  2. Most crashes on B.C. Day long weekend occur on Friday so plan to leave on Thursday or Saturday morning if possible to avoid traffic congestion and possible delays. You should also make sure you get a good night’s sleep to avoid getting fatigued behind the wheel. Plan your route on drivebc.ca and include rest breaks or switch drivers every two hours.

  3. Do a pre-trip check and check your engine oil, coolant levels and lights, and inspect your vehicle tires, including the spare, to make sure they’re in good condition and properly inflated. Make sure any camping or outdoor equipment is securely tied down to your vehicle before you take off.

  4. Summer means more motorcyclists on our roads so it’s vital to scan as you approach an intersection. Be ready to yield the right-of-way when turning left and keep in mind that it can be hard to tell how fast motorcyclists are travelling.

  5. Be patient with R.V. drivers if they’re travelling below the speed limit in mountainous areas as they’re likely going uphill as fast as they can. If you’re driving your RV this weekend, be courteous and pull over when it’s safe to do so to let others by. This is much safer than a driver making an unsafe pass out of frustration.

Regional statistics*:

  • Over the B.C. day long weekend, on average, 420 people are injured in 1,400 crashes in the Lower Mainland every year.

  • Over the B.C. Day long weekend, on average, 94 people are injured in 380 crashes in the Southern Interior every year.

  • Over the B.C. Day long weekend, on average, 26 people are injured in 130 crashes in North Central B.C. every year.

  • Over the B.C. Day long weekend, on average, 75 people are injured in 330 crashes on Vancouver Island every year.

* Five-year annual average. Crash and injury data is ICBC data (2015 to 2019). Fatality data is police data (2014 to 2018). B.C. Day long weekend is calculated from 18:00 the Friday prior to B.C. Day to midnight on B.C. Day.

Extensive new ICBC data available to public online

British Columbians can now access comprehensive new data, quickly and easily, as part of ICBC’s commitment to increase transparency, with extensive crash and vehicle population data available on icbc.com.

“Making sure the public is well-informed and supported is a priority,” said Nicolas Jimenez, ICBC’s president and CEO. “We’ll continue to expand the data available on icbc.com to better support customers, researchers, media and stakeholders.”

ICBC is sharing more data publicly in a customizable, convenient format that will make data available to the public in a timelier way. This initiative also supports the B.C. government’s Open Data initiative.

Customers can customize the new data sets or download the data in its entirety.

Vehicle population data includes various fields such as municipality, vehicle type or area based on the first three characters of a postal code. Crash data can be filtered to the details of an individual crash, including the street and crash configuration (for example, rear end, head on or side impact). As an example, users can filter crash data to municipality level by severity, street name and identify whether a pedestrian or cyclist was involved.

More data will be added throughout the year on topics including contraventions and driver licensing.

Quick Statistics, a collection of the most commonly requested statistics provided in a simple view, was previously published as PDFs and is now available in a downloadable, interactive format. Quick Statistics and crash maps have also been updated with 2019 data.

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