Creative Uses of Life Insurance, Split Beneficiary Planning

This new Life/A&S course is now available and included as part of your ILS LIFE/A&S Course Subscription.

In this course, learn how in certain cases Split Beneficiary Planning allows for cash extractions (free of dividend tax) from the corporation in excess of actual policy premiums; how a separate and well drafted Split Beneficiary Agreement is required, including a defendable pricing model likely using NCPI as the source cost; and that specialized legal and tax advice may be needed before implementing such planning.

This course breaks down as follows:

  • Part 1: Corporations & Insurance
  • Part 2: Disruptions to Corporate Owned Insurance
  • Part 3: Agreements on the Use of Insurance with Corporations
  • Part 4: The Pricing Models

 

SAMPLE COURSE MATERIAL

Corporate Insurability

1.Key Man Insurance.  In the event of the death of a key employee, a corporation could sustain material financial hardship.  Key Man Insurance provides funding to assist the corporation maintain working capital balances in the transition period after death.

2.Shareholder Agreements.  Shareholder agreements govern actions between shareholdings in the event of the death of a shareholder.  Some agreements obligate the corporation to redeem the shares in what is called a “Corporate Redemption or Corporate Repurchase”.  Insurance in this context provides the needed funds to repurchase the deceased’s shares.

3.Loan Offset Insurance.  Sometimes creditors of a corporation will ask that key people are insured.  Should they pass away, the insurance is used to repay corporate loans.

4.Buy-Out Insurance.  Similar to shareholder agreements, corporations that transition owner-managers (key people) will often insure one or both parties (acquirer and/or purchaser) so that financial exposure during the acquisition period is covered by insurance.

Corporate Funded Insurance – Benefits

While Living:

1.A corporation (with an insurance interest) is allowed to pay insurance premiums.

2.Corporate paid premiums are normally a “non-deductible expense” (called an “add-back” on the corporate tax return).

3.This allows payment of insurance AFTER corporate income tax but BEFORE personal dividend tax.

MORE INFO ON COURSE

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