With fewer vehicles on our roads right now, drivers may be tempted to speed. Even though it seems safer with fewer cars on the road, it isn’t. Speeding increases your risk of crashing and reduces the amount of time you have to react to the unexpected. ICBC is asking that we all do our part to prevent crashes, keep people safe, and avoid putting additional pressure on B.C.’s first responders and medical resources.

Every year, 82 people are killed in speed-related crashes, making speed the number one cause of car crash fatalities in B.C.*

Police have observed an increase in drivers speeding since B.C. declared a state of emergency due to the Covid-19 pandemic. This is why ICBC, the B.C. government and police are launching a month-long campaign focusing on speed and urging drivers to slow down.

Speeding is a concern for all road users, not just drivers. Many families are taking this time to get outside for walks or bike rides so it’s important for drivers to be extra cautious and look out for pedestrians and cyclists.

The campaign includes radio and digital advertising plus social media reminding drivers that the faster you go, the easier it is to make a mistake. Remember, if you must go out, check your speed and drive within the limits.

Learn interesting facts, get tips and more on icbc.com.

Quotes:

Chief Officer Neil Dubord, Chair of the B.C. Association of Chiefs of Police Traffic Safety Committee

“While everyday life has recently changed for many in B.C., nothing has changed when it comes to road safety. Speed, distracted driving and impaired driving are just a few of the high-risk driving behaviours that put everyone at risk. With the use of intersection safety cameras and dedicated police agencies throughout the province, drivers are sure to be caught and held accountable when they make the choice to disregard the rules of the road.”

Lindsay Matthews, ICBC’s Vice-President Public Affairs and Driver Licensing

“Whether you’re a driver, rider, cyclist or pedestrian – we can all play our part over the coming months by only travelling when necessary, and taking extra care on every journey. Driving over the speed limit really doesn’t get you there noticeably sooner, and instead increases your chances of crashing.”

Regional statistics*:

  • On average, 26 people are killed every year in the Lower Mainland from speed-related crashes.

  • On average, 12 people are killed every year on Vancouver Island from speed-related crashes.

  • On average, 27 people are killed every year in the Southern Interior from speed-related crashes.

  • On average, 18 people are killed every year in North Central B.C from speed-related crashes.

*Police-reported data, five-year average from 2014 to 2018.

Speed includes unsafe speed, exceeding

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