The community continues to pull together a week after 2 tornadoes struck Windsor & LaSalle.

Excerpted article written by Kelly Steele, Windsor Star

Arnold Brown, 60, is homeless after Wednesday’s tornado destroyed the home he rents on Victory street. The roof was ripped off leaving the inside exposed to the rain and most of his belongings inside destroyed. Red Cross has put him up in a hotel for a few nights but he’s faced with looking for a place to live.

“It’s pretty devastating,” he said. “There’s no way you can look at it any other way. We lost everything. I just started crying afterward.”

But Brown said in the midst of all the chaos, the neighbours all pulled together to help.

“The neighbours all came over to see if we were okay,” he said. “It really looked bad around here. This is going to stay with me for awhile, I’ve been having nightmares about it.”

Erik Lobzun, who lives next door, said the roof of his home sustained substantial damage, windows were broken and he suspects there may be other damage to the house.

“We are picking up and things are getting cleaned up,” he said. “Insurance is being really good, which helps. The community really pulled together which really helped.”

After the storm subsided, neighbours went from house to house in the Victory Street area helping to tarp exposed roofs. Some walked around with chainsaws helping to cut up the fallen trees. Zehrs came out with coolers of water and food for everyone.

“You start to lose faith in humanity and something like this brings it back,” he said. “I was amazed at the level of effort from everyone.”

In Windsor, close to 400 workers from Empire Roofing, Belfor Property Restoration and Rosati construction have pulled together since Saturday to fix the roof at Kautex Corporation on Deziel Drive by Friday. The tornado ripped the roof off the auto parts plant forcing its to shut down leaving its 200 employees out of work.

“It’s an extremely expensive undertaking but we’ve all joined forces to make this happen,” said Nada Tayar, service manager with Empire Roofing. “Every piece of our equipment is there and we’ve pulled manpower from every job site in Windsor, Toronto and London.”

Workers are staying in hotels and working countless hours on the roof. Despite the long hours, Tayar said morale is great as everyone is “working from their heart to support their community.”

Sara Monger, spokesperson for Kautex, said the company is continuing to proceed with clean up and repairs and are looking to get things “back on track as soon as possible.” The damage is extensive as the roof was peeled off as well as two walls were blown off.

“We have a pretty strict timeline of events that we are adhering to and we are in constant contact with our customers,” she said. “At this point we don’t even have power at the plant and are running off generators.”

On Tuesday, the plant did manage to get one of its production lines running by using the generators. “We are trying as hard as we can to get things up and back on line. We need that and so do our customers.”

Last Wednesday, Environment Canada’s Storm team confirmed two separate tornadoes touched down. The first tornado, a confirmed F1, touched down in LaSalle around 7:06 p.m. bringing winds from 135- 175 km/hr. The storm gained power and by 7:15 p.m. it had become an F2 tornado when it hit the industrial areas around E.C. Row and Central Avenue. It carried winds between 200 – 220 km/hr.

On the weekend, members of the Windsor Essex County Canoe Club grabbed their kayaks, canoes and boats and headed out to Peche Island to clean up the debris dropped by the tornado. Club president Stacey Adam said most of the debris was roofing material likely from the Kautex plant. The club collected close to 60 bags and are planning to go back Thursday to finish the cleanup.

Transit Windsor continues to detour its Central 3 route which normally travels through Deziel Drive, Kautex Drive and Mannhein Way. The detour will now see the route only travel to Rhodes Drive avoiding the affected areas. Gary Brown, manager of operations with Transit Windsor, said they are monitoring the area but at this point those roads are still closed.

Damage costs from the storms are still being tallied. Steve Kee, director of media and digital communications with Insurance Bureau of Canada said they are still dealing with insurance companies submitting claims. The IBC is the national industry association representing Canada’s private home, auto and business insurers.

Severe summer storm in Alberta & Saskatchewan causes close to $65 million in insured damage

Insurance Bureau of Canada (IBC) reports a severe storm that swept through Southern Alberta and Saskatchewan during the third week of July has resulted in nearly $65 million in insured damage according to Catastrophe Indices and Quantification Inc. (CatIQ).

From July 15 – 16, a low pressure system caused heavy rainfall, large hail, and localized flash flooding in parts of southern Alberta and southern Saskatchewan. This system caused significant hail damage in Lethbridge, AB and localized flooding in Calgary, AB and Arbour Lake, AB. This storm also brought over 60mm of rain to Swift Current, SK in less than one hour.

“This is yet another example of severe weather events causing extensive damage in our region,” said Bill Adams, Vice-President, Western and Pacific, IBC. “This has been an active summer across the Prairies and it reinforces the need for Canadians to understand their insurance policies and to have an emergency preparedness plan for when bad weather strikes.”

Most damage was reported to have occurred in Alberta. Damage to homes and autos in that province, largely due to hail, resulted in upwards of $59 million in claims alone. This storm follows a previous system that hit the Prairies a week earlier which resulted in more than $48 million in insured damage.

About Insurance Bureau of Canada
Insurance Bureau of Canada (IBC) is the national industry association representing Canada’s private home, auto and business insurers. Its member companies make up 90% of the property and casualty (P&C) insurance market in Canada. For more than 50 years, IBC has worked with governments across the country to help make affordable home, auto and business insurance available for all Canadians. IBC supports the vision of consumers and governments trusting, valuing and supporting the private P&C insurance industry. It champions key issues and helps educate consumers on how best to protect their homes, cars, businesses and properties.

P&C insurance touches the lives of nearly every Canadian and plays a critical role in keeping businesses safe and the Canadian economy strong. It employs more than 120,000 Canadians, pays $8.2 billion in taxes and has a total premium base of $49 billion.

For media releases and more information, visit IBC’s Media Centre at www.ibc.ca.. If you have a question about home, auto or business insurance, contact IBC’s Consumer Information Centre at 1-844-2ask-IBC.

About CatIQ
Catastrophe Indices and Quantification Inc. (CatIQ) delivers detailed analytical and meteorological information on Canadian natural and man-made catastrophes. Through its online subscription-based platform, CatIQ combines comprehensive insured loss indices and other related information to better serve the needs of the insurance and reinsurance industries, public sector and other stakeholders. To learn more, visit www.catiq.com.

If you require more information, IBC spokespeople are available to discuss the details in this media release.

SOURCE Insurance Bureau of Canada

Central & northern Alberta rocked by extreme weather; emergency alert issued for Westlock, Alta.

Parts of central Alberta were slammed with severe weather Monday evening.

The Alberta government issued an emergency alert for Westlock after heavy rain caused significant flooding in the central Alberta town.

Just after 7 p.m., officials said the town’s emergency and operations staff were “on scene dealing with the incident.”

Area residents were asked to avoid all flooded areas and not to drive past any roadblocks.

The town of Westlock is about a one-hour drive northwest of Edmonton.

Flooding was also being reported by viewers in Onoway, about a 45-minute drive southwest of Westlock, and in Buck Lake, which is about a 90-minute drive southwest of Edmonton. The extent of flooding in those communities is unknown

For local updates please follow http://emergencyalert.alberta.ca/

Global News 

 

 

Insurance Bureau of Canada reminds consumers to be prepared for severe summer weather

In many parts of Canada, August means high temperatures and severe summer weather. Severe storms with hail, lightning, strong winds and heavy rain are unpredictable and can strike quickly with devastating results. Insurance Bureau of Canada (IBC) reminds Canadians to be aware and take action to prepare for potentially damaging storms.

“We know that violent summer storms are occurring more often, in more parts of the country, and with greater intensity,” said Kim Donaldson, Vice President, Ontario, IBC. “Given these trends, it is vital for people to understand their policies, to talk to their insurance representative, and to take steps to protect their families, properties, and vehicles.”

Insurance Coverage

Talk to your insurance representative to make sure you have appropriate coverage.

  • While pre-existing damage is not covered, damage to homes caused by storms is usually covered under most home insurance policies. This includes damage caused by flying debris or falling branches or trees, or damage to your home and contents from water entering through openings caused by wind or hail.
  • Comprehensive auto coverage isn’t mandatory, but if you have purchased comprehensive or all perils auto insurance, damage to vehicles from wind, hail, or water is usually covered, so check your policy.
  • Policy wordings vary so it’s best to check with your insurance representative to be certain whether storm damage to mobile homes or trailers may be covered.

 

IBC tips for starting the claims process

  1. Call your insurance representative or company. Most insurers have a 24-hour claims service. Be as detailed as possible when providing information.
  2. List all damaged or destroyed items. If possible, assemble proofs of purchase, photos, receipts and warranties. Take photos of damage incurred and keep damaged items, unless they pose a health hazard.
  3. Keep all receipts related to cleanup and additional living expenses if you’ve been displaced by insured damage. Ask your insurance representative about what expenses you’re entitled to and for what period of time.
  4. Review your policy to ensure you are familiar with specified deductibles and coverage limits. Talk to your insurance representative if anything is unclear.

 

“Be sure to speak with your insurance representative before a severe storm strikes to make sure your policies are up to date and serve your particular needs.” added Donaldson.

About Insurance Bureau of Canada
Insurance Bureau of Canada (IBC) is the national industry association representing Canada’s private home, auto and business insurers. Its member companies make up 90% of the property and casualty (P&C) insurance market in Canada. For more than 50 years, IBC has worked with governments across the country to help make affordable home, auto and business insurance available for all Canadians. IBC supports the vision of consumers and governments trusting, valuing and supporting the private P&C insurance industry. It champions key issues and helps educate consumers on how best to protect their homes, cars, businesses and properties.

P&C insurance touches the lives of nearly every Canadian and plays a critical role in keeping businesses safe and the Canadian economy strong. It employs more than 118,000 Canadians, pays $6.7 billion in taxes and has a total premium base of $48 billion.

For media releases and more information, visit IBC’s Media Centre at www.ibc.ca. Follow IBC on Twitter @InsuranceBureau and@IBC_Ontario or like us on Facebook. If you have a question about home, auto or business insurance, contact IBC’s Consumer Information Centre at 1-844-2ask-IBC.

If you require more information, IBC spokespeople are available to discuss the details in this media release.

SOURCE Insurance Bureau of Canada

Insurance Bureau: Est. of insured losses from #FortMacFire = $3.58 billion

FORT MCMURRAY, Alta. _ The Insurance Bureau of Canada says damage caused by the wildfires in Fort McMurray, Alta., totalled $3.58 billion, making it the most expensive disaster for insurers in the country’s history.

CEO Don Forgeron says the damage from the fires provide “alarming evidence” that extreme weather events have increased in frequency and severity in Canada.

Forgeron called for a more disciplined approach to helping prepare people for fires and floods.

The fires in May forced the evacuation of almost 90,000 residents from the Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo and destroyed about 2,400 homes and other buildings.

People have since been allowed back into the community, but it took nearly two months before a state of emergency could be lifted.

The bureau said its estimate was the first based on data collected by Catastrophe Indices and Quantification Inc., a company that compiles insured loss amounts based on surveys with insurers.

Catastrophe Indices and Quantification says there are more than 27,000 personal property claims, with each one averaging $81,000.

Previously, the costliest insured disaster in Canada was the Quebec ice storm of 1998, which forced insurers to pay out $1.9 billion in constant 2014 dollars, according to a 2015 annual report from the bureau.

The Alberta floods of 2013 were the next costliest, resulting in $1.8 billion in insured damage.

canada-press

IBC helps Ontarians prepare for the risk of severe weather

IBC helps Ontarians prepare for the risk of severe weather

Press Release:

June signals both higher temperatures and increased risk of severe weather. Incidents of high winds and tornadoes are more frequent in the hotter months. Certain areas of the country, including southern Ontario, are prone to these dangerous storms.

While it’s impossible to stop such disasters from occurring, it is possible to increase your readiness. Insurance Bureau of Canada (IBC) is reaching out to Ontarians with tips and information to help them protect their properties from wind and tornado damage.

“Severe weather has become the new normal,” said Kim Donaldson, Vice-President, Ontario, IBC. “Damaging storms accompanied by thunder, lightning and high winds, can strike at any time and leave trail of destruction. It is important for Ontarians to take steps now to ensure they have the proper insurance coverage before a disaster occurs.”

IBC offers the following tips to help Ontarians prepare for the risk of severe weather: ·

IBC wants consumers to know that insurance typically covers wind damage but they should ask their insurance representative to confirm what losses may be covered.

  • Hail, wind, snow or rain damage to a home is typically covered. This coverage usually includes:
    • Losses caused by flying debris or falling branches or trees
    • Losses to your home and contents from water or snow entering through sudden openings caused by wind or hail.
  • Wind, hail, ice or water damage to vehicles is typically covered if you purchased comprehensive or all perils auto insurance. This coverage is not mandatory, so check your policy.
  • Wind damage to mobile homes and/or trailers may be covered. As policy wordings vary, ask your insurance representative for more information.
  • In certain circumstances, homeowners who are unable to live in their homes because of insurable damage may be entitled to living expenses.

If your property is damaged during severe weather, it is important to document any damages and check with your insurance representative as soon as possible. Most insurers have a 24-hour claims service. Be as detailed as possible when providing information.

  • List all damaged or destroyed items. If possible, assemble proofs of purchase, photos, receipts and warranties. Take photos of the damage that has occurred and keep the damaged items unless they pose a health hazard.
  • Keep all receipts related to cleanup. If you’ve been displaced, keep all of the receipts for your living expenses. Ask your insurance representative about what expenses you may be entitled to and for what period of time.

About Insurance Bureau of Canada

Insurance Bureau of Canada (IBC) is the national industry association representing Canada’s private home, auto and business insurers. Its member companies make up 90% of the property and casualty (P&C) insurance market in Canada. For more than 50 years, IBC has worked with governments across the country to help make affordable home, auto and business insurance available for all Canadians. IBC supports the vision of consumers and governments trusting, valuing and supporting the private P&C insurance industry. It champions key issues and helps educate consumers on how best to protect their homes, cars, businesses and properties.

P&C insurance touches the lives of nearly every Canadian and plays a critical role in keeping businesses safe and the Canadian economy strong. It employs more than 120,000 Canadians, pays $8.2 billion in taxes and has a total premium base of $49 billion.

For media releases and more information, visit IBC’s Media Centre at www.ibc.ca. If you have a question about home, auto or business insurance, contact IBC’s Consumer Information Centre at 1‑844‑2ask-IBC.

If you require more information, IBC spokespeople are available to discuss the details in this media release.

SOURCE Insurance Bureau of Canada

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