38% of Canadian Professionals Will Shop Online From Work This Holiday Season

38% of Canadian Professionals Will Shop Online From Work This Holiday Season

Toronto, ON — Online shopping has afforded consumers the luxury of shopping around the clock, but how many professionals take advantage by shopping on the clock during the holidays? Nearly two in five Canadian employees (38 per cent) will be “workshopping” — shopping online from the office or when using corporate devices — according to a new survey from staffing firm Robert Half Technology. Of those respondents, 21 per cent admitted that looking for cyber deals hinders their on-the-job productivity.

Even though 76 per cent of technology leaders said their firm allows for it, more than half (55 per cent) prefer employees avoid shopping online during business hours or while using a company device. Security risks (62 per cent) and loss of productivity (30 per cent) are the top “workshopping” concerns among tech managers. 

“Between planning for the holidays, fitting in social obligations and wrapping up major projects, year-end can be a stressful time for workers,” said Deborah Bottineau, district director for Robert Half Technology. “Online shopping during the workday can be a helpful way to manage to-do lists and alleviate some of the pressures of the season.”

“Tech leaders should anticipate an increase in online shopping this time of year and make a proactive effort to refresh and communicate IT security policies with their teams,” added Bottineau. “Ensuring employees limit their browsing time and understand safe online practices can mitigate potential risks to the organization and help staff stay productive both at and outside of work.”

Additional findings:

  • Workers ages 18 to 34 (47 per cent) are the most likely to “workshop,” compared to 38 per cent of workers ages 35 to 54 and 17 per cent of workers 55 and older.
  • Forty-four per cent of all “workshoppers” say they’ll spend under 30 minutes per week shopping from work during the holiday season, while 38 per cent will spend up to an hour per week “workshopping.”
  • Thirty-nine per cent say they like to “workshop” just about any day; 22 per cent say Cyber Monday is their favourite day to “workshop,” followed by Amazon Prime Day (16 per cent).

About the Research
The online surveys were developed by Robert Half Technology and conducted by independent research firms. They include responses from more than 500 workers 18 years of age or older and employed in office environments and more than 270 IT decision makers in Canada.

About Robert Half Technology
With more than 100 locations worldwide, Robert Half Technology is a leading provider of technology professionals for initiatives ranging from web development and multiplatform systems integration to network security and technical support. Robert Half Technology offers online job search services at roberthalf.ca/technology

Tech-savvy Thieves Don’t Need Your Keys

Insurance Bureau of Canada releases its 2019 Top 10 Stolen Vehicles list –

TORONTO, Dec. 3, 2019 /CNW/ – While the technology in our vehicles continues to evolve, so do sophisticated auto thieves who are using technology to bypass security systems and electronically gain access to Canadians’ vehicles. Insurance Bureau of Canada (IBC) is finding that technology is having a major impact on vehicle thefts, evident in its annual list, released today, of Canada’s most frequently stolen vehicles.

“Electronic auto theft is on the rise across the country as more vehicles are equipped with technology like keyless entry fobs,” said Bryan Gast, National Director of Investigative Services, IBC. “Regardless of how a vehicle is stolen, auto theft is a serious threat to Public Safety and continues to cost all Canadians.”

Auto theft is big business in Canada

Auto theft costs Canadians close to $1 billion every year. This includes $542 million for insurers to fix or replace stolen vehicles, $250 million in police, health care and court system costs and millions more for correctional services.

While some vehicles are stolen to commit another crime or to be used to go for a “joyride”, many others are stolen by organized crime groups to be sold to unsuspecting consumers in Canada, shipped abroad or stripped down for parts.

2019 Top 10 Stolen Vehicles

IBC’s Top 10 Stolen Vehicles list is compiled using data from IBC’s member companies across the country. This year’s list includes nine vehicles that don’t have ignition immobilizers, which are devices that can prevent thieves from hot-wiring a vehicle. The lack of an ignition immobilizer is the number one reason this series of Ford trucks continues to take up the majority of spots on the list.

  1. Ford 350SD AWD 2007
  2. Ford 350SD AWD 2006
  3. Ford 350SD AWD 2005
  4. Ford 350SD AWD 2004
  5. Ford 250SD AWD 2006
  6. Ford 350SD AWD 2003
  7. Lexus RX350/RX350L/RX450h/RX450hL 4DR AWD 2018
  8. Ford F250 SD 4WD 2005
  9. Ford F350 SD 4AWD 2002
  10. Honda Civic Si 2DR Coupe 1998

Tips to prevent auto theft  

Even with today’s tech-savvy thieves, there are a number of steps Canadians can take to help protect themselves from becoming a victim of auto theft.

  • Don’t leave a keyless entry fob in a vehicle or unprotected at the front entrance of your home. Thieves can use wireless transmitters to intercept the signal, giving them access to the vehicle. Consider storing fobs in a protective box or bag that blocks the signal.
  • Install an immobilizing device which prevents thieves from bypassing the ignition and hot-wiring a vehicle. This can include devices that require wireless ignition authentication or starter, ignition and fuel pump disablers.
  • Install a tracking device that emits a signal to police or a monitoring station if a vehicle is stolen.
  • Don’t make your vehicle an easy target:
    • Never leave a vehicle running when unattended.
    • Lock the doors and close all windows when parked.
    • Make sure to park in well-lit areas or in the garage.
    • Use a visible or audible device that shows thieves a vehicle is protected.
    • Consider using a deterrent like a steering wheel or brake pedal lock.
    • Don’t leave personal information, like insurance and ownership documents, in the glove box when parked.

Interviews

IBC’s National Director of Investigative Services, Bryan Gast, is available for interviews and commentary on the list and how technology is changing how thieves steal vehicles in Canada. Mr. Gast comes to IBC after years of law enforcement service in Ontario.

Background

About Insurance Bureau of Canada

Insurance Bureau of Canada (IBC) is the national industry association representing Canada’s private home, auto and business insurers. Its member companies make up 90% of the property and casualty (P&C) insurance market in Canada. For more than 50 years, IBC has worked with governments across the country to help make affordable home, auto and business insurance available for all Canadians. IBC supports the vision of consumers and governments trusting, valuing and supporting the private P&C insurance industry. It champions key issues and helps educate consumers on how best to protect their homes, cars, businesses and properties.

P&C insurance touches the lives of nearly every Canadian and plays a critical role in keeping businesses safe and the Canadian economy strong. It employs more than 128,000 Canadians, contributes $9.4 billion in taxes and has a total premium base of $59.6 billion.

For media releases and more information, visit IBC’s Media Centre at www.ibc.ca. Follow us on Twitter @InsuranceBureau or like us on Facebook. If you have a question about home, auto or business insurance, contact IBC’s Consumer Information Centre at 1-844-2ask-IBC.

SOURCE Insurance Bureau of Canada

Mobile Phone Insurance Ecosystem Market Size | Incredible Possibilities

Source: All Times Tech

The research report presents a deep review of the Global Mobile Phone Insurance Ecosystem Market comprises of objectives analysis. The following segment centers around Mobile Phone Insurance Ecosystem market size, country-wise production revenue ($) and development rate estimation from 2019-2024.

The report additionally covers global Mobile Phone Insurance Ecosystem market share by industry players, product and applications. The report enables investors to evaluate the market, featuring the upcoming business opportunities, mindful of Mobile Phone Insurance Ecosystem industry news and arrangements by countries, technological development, limitations and difficulties in estimate years (2019-2024) and settle on a fundamental business decision.

Get Sample PDF of Report @ https://www.researchkraft.com/request-sample/973505

The key players covered in this study:

Allianz Insurance, AmTrust International Underwriters, Assurant, Asurion, Aviva, Brightstar Corporation, Geek Squad, GoCare Warranty Group, Apple, AIG

Market Segment by Type, the product can be Split into:

  • wireless carriers
  • insurance specialists
  • device OEMs
  • retailers

Market Segment by Application, Split into:

  • Physical Damage
  • Theft & Loss
  • Others

The Global Mobile Phone Insurance Ecosystem statistical surveying report studies the presence of the top to bottom market segments. The market is surveyed based on revenue (USD Million) and presents the significant players and providers affecting the market. Most of the Mobile Phone Insurance Ecosystem data, together with anticipated insights, is introduced in the report with the assistance of tables and figures and Mobile Phone Insurance Ecosystem introduction procedure causes the client to comprehend the market situation.

Get a discount on this research report @ https://www.researchkraft.com/check-discount/973505

Mobile Phone Insurance Ecosystem Market Regional Analysis Includes:

Americas, United States, Canada, Mexico, Brazil, APAC, China, Japan, Korea, Southeast Asia, India, Australia, Europe, Germany, France, UK, Italy, Russia, Spain, Middle East & Africa, Egypt, South Africa, Israel, Turkey, GCC Countries

The Mobile Phone Insurance Ecosystem report additionally forecasts global market growth, alongside characterization dependent on geographical conditions. The regions are delegated with information which is outfitted in the release of the global Mobile Phone Insurance Ecosystem market growth is consistently assembled from reliable industries for anticipating the advancement of each section.

Major Points Covered in Table of Contents:-

  1. Scope of the Report
  2. Executive Summary
  3. Global Mobile Phone Insurance Ecosystem Market by Players
  4. Mobile Phone Insurance Ecosystem Industry by Regions
  5. Americas
  6. APAC
  7. Europe
  8. Middle East and Africa
  9. Market Drivers, Challenges and Trends
  10. Marketing, Distributors and Customer
  11. Global Mobile Phone Insurance Ecosystem Market Forecast
  12. Key Players Analysis
  13. Research Findings and Conclusion

Daisy Intelligence Raises $10 Million in Funding to Scale Its AI Platform

Source: Business Wire

TORONTO — Daisy Intelligence today announced that it has raised $10 million (CDN) in Series A financing led by Framework Venture Partners and partnered by European-based corporate investor, Sonae IM. The funding will enable Daisy to expand globally, invest in sales and marketing, provide further support for its customer success teams, and expand its operational infrastructure as growth demands.

Daisy’s AI-powered technology platform helps retailers and insurance companies generate significantly improved financial results by delivering business recommendations and automating complex processes beyond human capability.

Daisy is driving a revolution in retail with its core AI SaaS platform, adding intelligence and automation to merchandising decisions. Daisy has helped its retail clients increase year over year, same store sales an average of 2.9% by optimizing their promotional product and pricing mix. Insurance companies use Daisy’s AI-powered risk management platform to detect and avoid millions of dollars in fraud and automatically adjudicate claims.

Daisy’s proprietary AI technology, which uses reinforcement learning, is attracting a rapidly growing client base across the U.S., Canada, Latin America, and Europe based on a record of proven business results. Over the past year, Daisy has doubled its revenues and staff by adding new clients and further deepening existing relationships with leading retailers and insurance companies.

“This financing round reflects the growing interest in our AI-powered platform from companies around the world looking to drive higher sales and profits with our unique technology that helps them make business decisions,” said Gary Saarenvirta, founder and CEO of Daisy. “This investment supports Daisy’s mission to empower people to achieve their best by using machine intelligence to help them with the most difficult tasks, freeing up their time to focus on more strategic business matters. With support from the world-class investors at Framework and Sonae IM, we are incredibly well positioned to execute on our vision.”

A preeminent authority on AI, Saarenvirta leveraged his background in aerospace engineering to bring autonomous machine intelligence based on reinforcement learning to clients in retail and insurance.

“There is a lot of vaporware and broken promises in the AI startup landscape,” said Peter Misek, Founding Partner at Framework Venture Partners. “After meeting hundreds of startups, Daisy was the first we met where we felt the promise could be delivered.”

The investment in Daisy is one of the first from Toronto-based Framework Venture Partners’ new $150 million fund focused on supporting rapidly scaling tech companies in Canada and abroad. Framework invests in software companies with a focus on businesses re-imagining the consumption and delivery of financial services or applying artificial intelligence solutions to large industry-specific datasets.

“Daisy Intelligence attracted our attention with its distinctive AI capabilities applied to merchandising, which is definitely a crucial activity within grocery retail. As a strategic investor with a strong European foothold, we have the ambition to support the company, with every means possible, in its growth and global expansion,” said Eduardo Piedade, CEO of Sonae IM.

Sonae IM is a European-based corporate venture investor specializing in retail, telecommunications, and cybersecurity technology, with a global mandate to invest in B2B companies both in growth and early stages. In retail tech, Sonae IM currently has more than 10 active investments worldwide, with Daisy Intelligence as its first investment in Canada.

For additional information visit daisyintelligence.com.

For more information, visit http://www.framework.vc.

Sonae IM is the technology investment arm of Sonae Group (www.sonae.pt/en/).

Desjardins launches $45-million fintech fund

Desjardins Group is launching a $45-million fund to invest in financial technology startups as it seeks to build more direct relationships with a nascent sector that once looked poised to disrupt traditional banking.

The new fund will make investments ranging from a few hundred thousand dollars to as much as $3-million, taking stakes of 10 per cent to 25 per cent in early-stage “fintech” companies. It will be managed by Desjardins Capital, the financial co-operative’s venture capital arm, which has invested in more than 400 companies.

The fund builds on existing partnerships and investments Desjardins has made with more than 20 fintechs dating back several years. The burgeoning fintech sector was once seen as a threat to established institutions such as Desjardins but, faced with the high cost and difficulty of acquiring new customers, many fintechs have changed course and have begun collaborating with large financial companies to help them with the transition to digital banking and insurance services.

By creating this new fund, Desjardins is looking to take tighter control of its investments in financial technologies, and to sharpen its focus on products and services that can directly contribute to its strategy, from innovation in insurance and wealth management to strengthening cybersecurity.

Desjardins has already pumped $25-million into Luge Capital, a venture fund focused on fintech and artificial intelligence that launched last year with a total of $75-million from backers such as Caisse de dépôt et placement du Québec and Sun Life Financial. Desjardins will continue to back Luge, but now wants to make its own investment decisions as well. Whereas past investments have often been confined to startups in Quebec, the new fund will also seek out opportunities in the United States, Britain, Europe and Australia.

“With $45-million, we can do a lot,” said Guy Cormier, chief executive of Desjardins Group. “There’s a lot of noise, there’s a lot of buzz in the fintech industry, and we just have to be quite careful and quite clever about the kind of partnerships [we choose]. We really know what we want to do, what we want to accomplish, so we’re not trying to go everywhere. But with this fund now we have more capacity.”

The fund’s first investment falls outside the normal boundaries of fintech. Desjardins is putting $400,000 into X-TELIA Group Inc., a company that operates a wireless network tailored to home automation and connecting the so-called internet of things, to help expand its network across Canada. Desjardins sees applications to home and auto insurance, but is also a major lender to the agricultural sector, and X-TELIA connects smart sensors on farmers’ grain silos to make it easier to manage inventory.

“We want to add to our offer. It’s not any more enough for a financial institution to do the financing or to do the everyday banking,” said Martin Brunelle, vice-president of transformation and special projects at Desjardins. “What we want is to ease the lives of our members or our customers.”

Three other fintech companies are currently in the pipeline to receive investments from the new fund, Mr. Brunelle said. But they are at different stages of maturity and some could take years to bear fruit, if they flourish at all.

“The first goal is not return on investment for us. It’s really to build a relationship that is stronger, tighter with these fintechs, and will help us to build something that is great for our members and clients,” Mr. Cormier said. “The return on investment will be there maybe in a few years.”

Source: The Globe and Mail

Large law firms working together on blockchain M&A technology

Written By Anita Balakrishnan

Several major Canadian law firms are working together on a pilot project to make a “smart contract” using Ethereum blockchain.

Technology firm OpenLaw announced the project, which includes Bennett Jones LLP, Blake Cassels & Graydon LLP, Davies Ward Phillips & Vineberg LLP, Fasken Martineau Dumoulin LLP, Norton Rose Fulbright LLP and Stikeman Elliott LLP.

The six-month pilot with a consultancy called GenesisB focused on automating a merger and acquisition escrow agreement, OpenLaw said in the announcement.

“It’s really efficient when it’s fully realized,” she says. “I’m a big believer in what will be enabled through all kinds of projects like this.”

Bennett Jones partner Simon Grant, one of the lawyers who worked on the project, says the project was a “phase one” trial that used a real escrow agreement and model but not client funds. Since the project, however, Bennett Jones has worked separately with clients on putting smart contract technology into practice, using skills learned in the OpenLaw project, says Grant.

Grant says that by removing the need for an individual to act as an escrow agent, automation can be used not only in mergers and acquisitions but other types of transactions such as financing or even transactions where escrow isn’t currently used because it is too complicated.

“The collaboration . . . was among multiple law firms, but it was also between lawyers and programmers — being in the same room at the same time building this project for the ground up,” says Grant. He says that Toronto is a hub for exciting work on blockchain and other technology.

“What [technology companies] may not have is training on how contracts are understood and treated legally,” says Grant.

Anthony de Fazekas, head of technology and innovation for Norton Rose Fulbright Canada in Toronto, says it was important for companies such as OpenLaw to get the perspective of a variety of law firms, so different lawyers could have input on the legal parameters and standards of turning a traditional document-based contract into a smart contract.

“We are already seeing the trend [toward smart contracts] in client projects. With a smart contract, you’re going to need a law firm to sign off, from risk and liability and contractual standard point of view,” says de Fazekas, who also participated in the project. While a document may become a set of coded processes in a smart contract, a lawyer will still need to know how to audit each process, to validate the different allocations of risk between the parties, he says.

“That’s why these projects are important to lawyers and to law firms,” says de Fazekas.

While many people associate blockchain with crypto-currency, smart contracts don’t have to use so-called tokens and coins, says ter Haar. Existing tools such as DocuSign or Stripe can also be integrated into smart contracts, she says.

Blockchain technology, like other types of software, can be used by a wide variety of lawyers for tasks such as clearing a settlement of securities trades, verifying identities and protecting privilege, underwriting claims for insurance, patient records for health care or administering royalties in media, ter Haar says.

Technology lawyer Addison Cameron-Huff says that as clients demand more efficiency from their lawyers, blockchain will eventually be adopted. The question, he says, is who will win that business.

“Law firms have enormous domain knowledge that’s just waiting to be incorporated into tech products,” says Cameron-Huff. I can see why firms would want to capture that knowledge for their own advantage, rather than give it away to others.  Canadian firms are not trailblazers in tech. Part of the reason for this is the cost of these sorts of initiatives so it makes sense to pool resources to create new platforms that can then be used to expand the pie.”

Cameron-Huff says lawyers on Bay Street may be looking more toward winning on the global market than beating each other.

“The typical approach of firms is to compete with each other, but in the blockchain industry the typical approach is to work together,” he says.

LAW TIMES

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