Young adults ‘putting themselves at fraud risk’ by sharing details online

Young adults ‘putting themselves at fraud risk’ by sharing details online

Irish Examinar

Young adults’ willingness to share personal information with others online could be putting them at greater risk of fraud, a report warns.

While older people are often seen as less tech-savvy, potentially putting them at greater risk of fraud, UK bank NatWest found that less cautious behaviour among those aged 18 to 24 years old in particular could be making them vulnerable.

NatWest, which commissioned think tank Policy Network to look into financial fraud trends, found more than 80% of young adults in this age group are willing to share their email address online with their friends, and as many as 29% are willing to share their mother’s maiden name – a commonly used security question.

This contrasts with just 60% of over-55s willing to share their email address, and only 12% willing to share their mother’s maiden name.

The report was launched at a fraud summit being held by NatWest.

David Lowe, NatWest’s head of fraud prevention, said traditionally the view has been that older people are most at risk of financial fraud.

He said: “Whilst fraud is still prevalent in this age category, we are seeing an increasing trend in younger ’digital natives’ falling victim to online fraud.”

Matthew Laza, director at Policy Network, said: “We need to ensure that today’s school children don’t become another ’generation scammed’.

“As more and more of life moves online this is a real danger for the future.”

Research for this report involved a review of available data on fraud and scams, analysis of YouGov survey data, and interviews with fraud experts.

Source: www.irishexaminer.com

 

Government and business not keeping up with speed of technology

By David Hodges

THE CANADIAN PRESS

TORONTO _ A new report suggests the speed of technological advances has become so rapid that it’s outpacing the rate at which large Canadian businesses and government institutions can adapt, with the number of jobs threatened by automation ranging from 35 to 42 per cent.

The co-authored report, by Deloitte and the Human Resources Professionals Association, calls upon policy-makers and business leaders to prepare Canadian workers for the disruption that artificial intelligence, machine learning and other technologies are having on the economy.

“The changes we are seeing are nothing less than historic and governments and educators need to take a skills-first, not a job-first approach,” said Scott Allinson, vice-president of public affairs at the HRPA.

“Technology just seems to be outpacing the current business model,” added Allinson, pointing to last week’s announcement by Sears Canada that the retailer was shutting down its 130 remaining stores, leaving about 12,000 employees without a job.

“We’ve seen with the brick-and-mortar stores that they’re not keeping up with the change of what people are looking for, thanks to technology.”

Reforming education to ensure Canadians enter the workforce with the future-proofed skills they need to succeed in a digital world are among the key recommendations in the joint report.

It says this would require re-examining how schools are organized, with greater emphasis placed on interdisciplinary work, mental agility, critical thinking, teamwork, relationship management, and the capacity to learn itself “in other words, coaching the integrated capabilities needed for the future instead of teaching individual subjects.”

With workers today needing to upgrade their capabilities constantly, the report also calls upon businesses to take a leadership role in promoting “future-proofed capabilities” by replacing static learning and development programs with dynamic, continuous learning opportunities.

Among the ways this could be achieved would include making learning available on-demand, 24/7 to all employees on any digital platform: computer, tablet or smartphone. Employers that don’t offer these off-site, virtual learning opportunities will find it increasingly difficult to recruit and retain top talent, the report says.

Another key recommendation is modernizing provincial labour laws and the social safety net to reflect the realities of the “gig economy” _ which has turned the traditional one job/one employee/one employer model on its head, with pioneers like Uber and Airbnb doing away with large, hierarchical organizational structures altogether.

The report says that since 1997, Canada’s contingent workforce has grown from 4.8 million to 6.1 million and now accounts for about one-third of all jobs and is likely to keep growing.

While Ontario has been debating reforms to raise the minimum wage and improve the labour market, Allinson says that policy-makers across the country need to design solutions that reflect both the opportunities and the challenges facing gig-economy workers as well as free-agent employees in traditional companies. This includes significant reform to the way Canadian public policy approaches retirement planning, income taxes and unemployment insurance.

“We need to get down to the urgent work of assessing not just how work will change in Canada but how Canadian workers should prepare,” said Allinson.

Will your job be automated? 70 per cent of Americans say no

By Christopher Rugaber

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON _ Most Americans believe their jobs are safe from the spread of automation and robotics, at least during their lifetimes, and only a handful says automation has cost them a job or loss of income.

Just 30 per cent of people surveyed say that it is at least somewhat likely that their own jobs will be done by computers or robots. Seventy per cent say it is not very or not at all likely.

Still, a survey by the Pew Research Center also found widespread anxiety about the general impact of technological change. Three-quarters of Americans say it is at least “somewhat realistic” that robots and computers will eventually perform most of the jobs currently done by people. Roughly the same proportion worry that such an outcome will have negative consequences, such as worsening inequality.

“The public expects a number of different jobs and occupations to be replaced by technology in the coming decades, but few think their own job is heading in that direction,” Aaron Smith, associate director at the Pew Research Center, said.

More than half of respondents expect that fast food workers, insurance claims processors and legal clerks will be mostly replaced by robots and computers during their lifetimes. Nearly two-thirds think that most retailers will be fully automated in 20 years, with little or no human interaction between customers and employers.

Americans’ relative optimism about their own jobs might be the more accurate assessment. Many recent expert analyses are finding less dramatic impacts from automation than studies from several years ago that suggested up to half of jobs could be automated.

A report last week, issued by the education company Pearson, Oxford University, and the Nesta Foundation found that just one in five workers are in occupations that will shrink by 2030.

Many analysts increasingly focus on the impact of automation on specific tasks, rather than entire jobs. A report in January from the consulting firm McKinsey concluded that less than 5 per cent of occupations were likely to be entirely automated. But it also found that in 60 per cent of occupations, workers could see roughly one-third of their tasks automated.

That suggests workers will need to continually upgrade their skills as existing jobs evolve with new technologies.

Just 6 per cent of the respondents to the Pew survey said that they themselves have either lost a job or seen their hours or incomes cut because of automation. Perhaps not surprisingly, they have a much more negative view of technology’s impact on work. Nearly half of those respondents say that technology has actually made it harder for them to advance in their careers.

Contrary to the stereotype of older workers unable to keep up with new technology, younger workers aged 18 through 24 were the most likely to say that automation had cost them a job or income. Eleven per cent of workers in that group said automation had cut their pay or work hours. That’s double the proportion of workers aged 50 through 64 who said the same.

The Pew survey also found widespread skepticism about the benefits of many emerging technologies, with most Americans saying they would not ride in a driverless car. A majority are also not interested in using a robotic caregiver for elderly relatives.

Thirty per cent of respondents said they think self-driving cars would actually cause traffic accidents to increase, and 31 per cent said they would stay roughly the same. Just 39 per cent said they thought accidents would decline.

More than 80 per cent support the idea of requiring self-driving cars to stay in specific lanes.

The survey was conducted in May and had 4,135 respondents, Pew said.

Manulife’s new CEO says insurance industry still in dark ages

BNN 

TORONTO – Incoming Manulife (MFC.TO 1.55%) chief executive Roy Gori said on Thursday the insurance industry is “still in the dark ages” and needs to transform its technologies to adapt to changing consumer behaviors.

Speaking at the Scotiabank Financials Summit, Gori, who is taking over as CEO next month, said the vast majority of Manulife’s technology budget is spent on maintaining existing systems rather than investing in new technologies.

“We need to transform our business to be much more of a technology-driven company,” he said. “We need to become a much more customer-orientated organization and quite frankly the entire industry does. In many ways, if I’m absolutely honest, our industry is still in the dark ages.”

Gori, who will replace Chief Executive Donald Guloien, said customers are looking to be able to buy insurance products instantly rather than be bogged down with paperwork.

“If you apply for an insurance product you’ll get a 16-page application form with 120 questions more often that not. It’s still very paper-based, very manual and, as a result, our industry net promoter scores are really very poor,” he said.

Gori said embracing new technology was key to changing processes.

“Customers engage today on their phones with other organizations in a seamless, transparent and very efficient way,” he said. “That’s not how they work with the insurance industry, so we need to transform our technology footprint.”

RBC first bank in Canada to enable bill payments using Siri

Who doesn’t wish they had an assistant to pay their bills? Thanks to an update to the RBC Mobile app, Royal Bank of Canada (“RBC”) personal banking clients are now the first in Canada who can ask Siri to pay their bills on iPhone and iPad.

Image of the final bill payment screen when paying a bill using Siri on iPhone. ILSTV.com

RBC also launched seamless Interac e-Transfer® payments within iMessage, which means clients can send a transfer without leaving their iMessage window. Building on its market leading, free person-to-person (P2P) money transfer services for chequing account clients launched last year, and money transfers with Siri earlier this year, RBC continues to develop simple and innovative ways for clients to make payments and bank with their mobile devices.

“By offering bill payments through Siri and P2P transfers through iMessage, we’re providing more convenient solutions to support our client’s payment needs,” said Sean Amato-Gauci, executive vice-president, Cards, Payments and Banking, RBC. “Our clients are avid users of Interac e-Transfer payments, and embraced our launch of money transfers using Siri earlier this year. By giving clients the ability to seamlessly and conveniently bank using voice commands, we’re delivering simple and innovative solutions.”

 

Using Siri to pay your bills with the RBC Mobile app

Paying your bills using Siri is simple. Once you give the voice command, Siri will confirm the name from your payee list and the RBC Mobile app automatically debits your account and sends the payment. The payment is secure and protected by TouchID.

Sending an Interac e-Transfer payment is just as simple. Clients simply type the amount of money they’d like to send to their contact in the iMessage window, and authenticate the transfer using TouchID.

These payment solutions are the latest enhancements from the RBC innovation labs, which test new ideas by partnering with academia, fintechs and RBC clients to make banking easier. The RBC labs are actively working on a range of client solutions that will be coming to market this year.

“We’re one of the leading voices on artificial intelligence in Canada, and our integration of Siri into bill payments and P2P transfers are an example of how our clients are already benefitting from these advancements in AI,” said Amato-Gauci. “We’re committed to providing clients with exceptional experiences when, how and where it’s most convenient for them, including exploring ways to integrate into social networks and digital platforms that are essential to their everyday lives.”

The RBC Mobile app was recently awarded the Highest in Customer Satisfaction Among Canadian Mobile Banking Apps by the J.D. Power inaugural 2017 Canadian Banking Mobile App Satisfaction Study. RBC has seen an increase of more than 20 per cent in active mobile users over the past year, a clear indication that more Canadians are using the RBC Mobile app to bank whenever and wherever they want.

The RBC Mobile app is available for free download from the App Store on iPhone and iPad or at www.AppStore.com. For more information about the RBC Mobile app, please visit www.rbcroyalbank.com/mobile/.

About RBC
Royal Bank of Canada is Canada’s largest bank, and one of the largest banks in the world, based on market capitalization. We are one of North America’s leading diversified financial services companies, and provide personal and commercial banking, wealth management, insurance, investor services and capital markets products and services on a global basis. We have approximately 80,000 full- and part-time employees who serve more than 16 million personal, business, public sector and institutional clients through offices in Canada, the U.S. and 35 other countries. For more information, please visit rbc.com.

RBC helps communities prosper, supporting a broad range of community initiatives through donations, community investments and employee volunteer activities. For more information please see: http://www.rbc.com/community-sustainability/.

SOURCE RBC Royal Bank

For further information: Heather Colquhoun, RBC Communications, 437-994-5044, heather.colquhoun@rbc.com; Sarah Hall Turnbull, Blue Sky Communications, 416-458-3878, sturnbull@blueskycommunications.com

Understanding Cyber Threats, Monitoring Data Leakage & Monitoring Reputational Damage

Article by Aaron Baer

Organizations around the world were recently (and rather rudely) reminded of their data vulnerability when WannaCry unleashed its international ransomware attack that seized data remotely and demanded a ransom for its release. This attack provided an important reminder of the risks associated with data breaches and it forced many organizations to take a cold, hard look at their data protection strategies.

In light of this incident, there has arguably never been a better time for organizations to prioritize monitoring and managing digital risk. A recent report published by Digital Shadows (the “Report“) highlights the need for more sophisticated strategies as organizations’ digital footprints continue to expand at an overwhelming rate. As their digital footprints expand, organizations are exposed to new levels of external risk that are not adequately protected by traditional tactics.

A digital footprint is comprised of information left behind as a result of an organization’s or individual’s online activity – it exists outside the boundaries of internal protection. Employees, suppliers and many others with access to corporate data contribute to an organization’s digital footprint on a daily basis, and they (often unknowingly) expose sensitive information in the process.

While most information in the digital footprint is benign, there is a significant portion that is not. Threat actors focus on a subset called the ‘digital shadow,’ which includes exposed personal, corporate or technical information. Usually this information is highly confidential, sensitive or proprietary. Information left exposed in the digital shadow can be embarrassing for a company and can be leveraged by attackers looking to exploit, launch ransomware or other cyberattacks.

At the same time, organizations should be mindful that cyber-attackers are leaving their own digital footprints and digital shadows behind. The Report suggests that the most effective external digital risk management strategies involve monitoring this activity in order to gain insight and plan defensive strategies.

At a basic level, the Report suggests that external digital risk management requires identifying, assessing and taking steps to mitigate risk exposed by the digital footprint. More importantly, however, external digital risk management should involve: 1) understanding cyber threats, 2) monitoring data leakage, and 3) monitoring reputational risks.

Understanding Cyber Threats

According to the Report, tailored threat intelligence capability is the key to understanding cyber threats. Such intelligence should be premised on four main areas:

  1. Indications and warnings;
  2. Actor profiles;
  3. Campaign profiles; and
  4. Emerging tools.

In order to leverage threat intelligence, organizations should adapt their approach to their particular business. Further, they should focus on who the threat actors are, what they are planning, what tools they are using, and what tools may be developed in the future. Simply receiving generic information is not enough. Involving human analysts in the process, it is suggested, will help weed out irrelevant information and ultimately deliver capable and tailored intelligence.

Monitor Data Leakage

Organizations should be vigilant about monitoring data leakage, since attackers can use leaked data to their advantage. The Report suggests focusing on sensitive code, private encryption keys, employee credentials, confidential documents, intellectual property, and social media over-sharing. These areas of data leakage leave organizations particularly vulnerable, not only to attackers who seek to leverage this information in targeted cyber-attacks, but also to competitors and corporate espionage. Knowing the type of information leaked can provide insight into how the information might be used against you in the future.

Knowing when, where and how this information has been leaked is critical to implementing effective mitigation tactics. For example, if employees are leaking sensitive confidential information through the use of personal email or social media, organizations should be aware of this so that they can implement training and disciplinary procedures to counteract the behaviour.

Monitor Reputational Damage

Finally, the Report suggests that monitoring for reputational damage is a key component of effective external digital risk management. Organizations should be aware of ways by which their goodwill and branding are being leveraged online. According to the Report, the top five risk areas include:

  1. Phishing;
  2. Domain infringement;
  3. Spoofed profiles;
  4. Brand defamation; and
  5. Mobile application issues.

Being able to monitor and detect these activities can not only mitigate reputational damage, but also the negative impact on employees and customers.

In the context of cybersecurity, risk is a well-developed concept. The Report suggests that all risk management strategies should take into account external digital risks. As organizations continue to expand their global online presence and digital footprint, risk mitigation strategies must continue to evolve at the same pace.

As set out in another article recently published on The Spotlight, there are many ways to ensure your organization’s data is adequately protected in order to prevent costly data breaches. Organizations need to recognize the true scale of the cyberattacks they face, adapt to the changing landscape, and incorporate these best practices to protect their bottom line from the costs of data breaches.

The content of this article is intended to provide a general guide to the subject matter. Specialist advice should be sought about your specific circumstances.

Source: Mondaq

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