SGI: 190 motorists ticketed for unsafe winter driving in November

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Police issued 1901 tickets related to winter driving offences during November’s province-wide traffic safety spotlight on safe winter driving.

Drivers received the following tickets:

  • 41 tickets for driving at a speed greater than reasonable and safe
  • 15 tickets for driving with an obstructed windshield or window
  • 134 tickets for exceeding 60 km/h when passing emergency vehicles/highway equipment/tow trucks with lights flashing

There were also 4,517 tickets for speeding/aggressive driving, 382 tickets for distracted driving (301 of those for cellphone use), 354 occupant restraint tickets, and 296 offences related to impaired driving during the month1.

This winter, remember to drive according to road conditions by slowing down and increasing your following distance. It’s also important to remember to slow to 60 km/h when passing emergency vehicles, highway equipment and tow trucks with lights flashing.

December’s focus is on impaired driving, with police on the lookout for drivers under the influence of alcohol and/or drugs. Drivers are reminded to always plan a safe and sober ride home. Some safe ride options include using a designated driver, taxi, transit, a designated driving service, Operation Red Nose or Ding in the New Year.

Learn more about winter driving. Follow SGI on Facebook or Twitter for tips on how#wecandrivebetter.

About SGI

Saskatchewan Government Insurance (SGI) is the province’s self-sustaining auto insurance fund. SGI operates 21 claims centres and five salvage centres across Saskatchewan with a head office in Regina. SGI also works with a network of nearly 400 motor licence issuers across the province. Customers can now do some transactions online. Look for the MySGI link underOnline Services on your motor licence issuer’s website or SGI’s website.

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(Child Passenger Safety) Basics Course

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New report will lead to creation of national plan to combat distracted driving

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GUELPH, ON, Dec. 16, 2015 /CNW/ – Today, the Traffic Injury Research Foundation (TIRF) and The Co-operators released Distracted Driving in Canada: Making Progress, Taking Action, a report that provides a snapshot of activities underway in Canada to reduce distracted driving. Based on an environmental scan TIRF completed in partnership with Drop It and Drive (D.I.A.D.) earlier this year, it identifies the need for a national action plan to combat the problem and recommends the creation of a National Working Group on Distracted Driving that can work with a diverse set of stakeholders to develop such a strategy. In the months ahead, TIRF will take the lead on creating the working group, with the ongoing support of The Co-operators.

The report contains the results of an environmental scan and compiles statistics, recent initiatives and lessons learned about distracted driving strategies throughout the country, to establish a solid foundation upon which future activities may be planned and coordinated. It examines five main areas of focus: provincial and territorial government approaches to understanding and addressing the issue; enforcement strategies and outcomes; data collection and measurement; education and awareness campaigns; and legislation.

“The rapid pace of activity in response to this issue is unprecedented. Work is being undertaken on multiple fronts, both across jurisdictions and across sectors, to increase knowledge, track outcomes and identify solutions,” said Robyn Robertson, president and CEO of TIRF. “Increased coordination and sharing of these activities can help to maximize the results of our collective efforts.”

The report revealed that a primary emphasis was placed on improving data collection, and raising awareness and educating Canadians about distracted driving. In addition, there was a high level of coordination of activities within individual jurisdictions. Nevertheless, the problem of distracted driving persists. In fact, the research revealed that distracted driving is a significant contributor to crashes that is comparable to impaired driving in several jurisdictions.

The report concluded that distracted driving is widely considered a top priority by provincial and territorial governments across the country, which have implemented a number of measures to begin to address the problem. Researchers, non-profit organizations, industry professionals and media are equally engaged and working to strengthen efforts using complementary approaches. Yet there is a gap in specific mechanisms to facilitate coordination across groups of stakeholders, and efficient exchange of information and outcomes at the national level.

“Because distracted driving is still an emerging issue, and one that falls under provincial jurisdiction, bringing together stakeholders to help develop a strategic plan at a national level will be very valuable work,” said Kathy Bardswick, president and CEO of The Co-operators. “The information in this report will serve as a resource for the National Working Group on Distracted Driving as well as decision-makers across the country who share our concern for road safety.”

TIRF will be working closely with D.I.A.D. in early 2016 to form the National Working Group and engage its members in the development of a national action plan.

Distracted Driving in Canada: Making Progress, Taking Action is based on information collected from a broad cross-section of stakeholders from all three levels of government, police departments, insurance companies, health care institutions, non-governmental, academic and community organizations.

About the Traffic Injury Research Foundation:
The mission of the Traffic Injury Research Foundation (TIRF) is to reduce traffic-related deaths and injuries. TIRF is an independent, charitable road safety research institute. Since its inception in 1964, TIRF has become internationally recognized for its accomplishments in identifying the causes of road crashes and developing programs and policies to address them effectively.

About The Co-operators:
The Co-operators Group Limited is a Canadian-owned co-operative with more than $40 billion in assets under administration. Through its group of companies it offers home, auto, life, group, travel, commercial and farm insurance, as well as investment products. The Co-operators is well known for its community involvement and its commitment to sustainability. The Co-operators is listed among the 50 Best Employers in Canada by Aon Hewitt; Corporate Knights’ Best 50 Corporate Citizens in Canada; and the Top 50 Socially Responsible Corporations in Canada by Sustainalytics and Maclean’s magazine. For more information visit www.cooperators.ca.

SOURCE The Co-operators

Introducing Variable Speed Signs in BC

Variable Speed SignThe choice of a safe travel speed depending on the driving environment can be as varied as the number of drivers on the highway. I can recall responding to an injury crash on a icy divided highway where both the ambulance and I were using the left lane and all emergency warning equipment. Even with the urgency of the situation, travelling at 95 in the posted 110 km/h zone seemed to be appropriate to both of us. This was clearly not the case for other drivers as we were passed a number of times by vehicles using the right hand lane.

2016 will see the first introduction of variable speed limits (VSL) on highways in British Columbia. Slated for implementation segments of the Sea to Sky, Coquihalla and Trans Canada highways, the speed limit will be shown on electronic speed signs that can be changed remotely based on existing weather conditions. Data for the changes will be gathered through pavement and visibility sensors installed in these highway segments. Operations staff with the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure will use the data to change the speed limit displayed to one that is appropriate for safety.

Experience with VSL elsewhere indicates that it is generally well received by drivers and results in a safety improvement. VSL are especially effective if variable message signs indicate why the change has occurred. One drawback appears to be a tendency to create greater speed variance between vehicles. Another issue is that to remain effective, speed enforcement needs to be sufficient to maintain compliance.

Perhaps highway segments with VSL would be an ideal opportunity to introduce time over distance automated speed enforcement as well. The danger presented by conventional enforcement methods increases as VSL decrease. Automated enforcement could increase compliance and maintain uniformity in application without increasing risk.

 

Reference Links:

Cst. Tim Schewe (Ret.) runs DriveSmartBC, a community web site about traffic safety in British Columbia. For 25 years he was an officer with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, including five years on general duty, 20 in traffic and 10 as a collision analyst responsible of conducting technical investigations of collisions. He retired from policing in 2006 but continues to be active in traffic safety through the DriveSmartBC web site, teaching seminars and contributing content to newspapers and web sites.

GM Ignition Switch Compensation Fund Pays Out $594.5 million On 399 Claims, Final Report Says

Lawyers hired to compensate victims of General Motors’ faulty ignition switches have paid out $594.5 million to settle 399 eligible claims.

The numbers were released December 10, 2015 in a final report from compensation expert Kenneth Feinberg.

A total of 4,343 claims were filed with the GM fund. Only 9.2 per cent were deemed eligible for payments, including claims for 124 deaths and 275 injuries.

The fund says more than 90 per cent of the offers it made were accepted. Camille Biros, the compensation fund’s deputy director, has said that the claims that were rejected “couldn’t support any connection to the ignition switch.”

The switches in older model small cars such as the Chevy Cobalt can slip out of the “run” position and cut off the engine. They have been linked to crashes that caused at least 169 deaths.

The ignition switch scandal triggered a company-wide safety review that resulted in dozens of recalls of millions of vehicles. GM says it has made safety a priority and now is catching problems sooner to avoid large recalls. The company said in September that the recalls cost it over $5.3 billion. Since then, it has paid out another $1.6 billion to settle U.S. criminal charges and recall-related related lawsuits, bringing the total cost to about $6.9 billion.

The fund’s final report says that it paid 128 claims from crashes that happened before GM emerged from bankruptcy in July of 2009, which the company was not required to do. A bankruptcy judge has ruled that the new company that emerged from bankruptcy is shielded from such claims.

Despite the settlements, GM still faces costs from the recalls. In its most recent quarterly report filed with U.S. regulators the company said it still faces 217 wrongful death and injury lawsuits in the U.S. and Canada, as well as 122 lawsuits alleging that the recalls reduced values of owners’ cars.

GM spokesman Jim Cain said the Feinberg compensation fund was fair, compassionate and non-adversarial to crash victims and their families. “We faced the ignition switch issue with integrity, dignity and a clear determination to do the right thing both in the short and long term,” he said in a statement.

 

Hang Up and Drive: Alberta Adds Demerits to Fines for Distracted Driving

Alberta motorists caught driving while distracted will soon have to not only pay a fine, but will lose points on their licence as well.

Transportation Minister Brian Mason says the message is not getting through and tougher sanctions are needed.

Starting in three weeks, on Jan. 1, anyone caught driving while distracted gets a $287 fine and three demerit points against their driver’s licence.

Since Alberta began levying fines on drivers for distracted driving in 2011, close to 90,000 tickets have been handed out.

The vast majority went to drivers steering vehicles while looking or operating handheld devices.

Distracted driving includes using hand-held phones, texting, emailing, reading, writing, grooming or typing in GPS co-ordinates while behind the wheel.

 

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