Crashes on the rise in B.C.; new ICBC campaign targets bad driving habits

Crashes on the rise in B.C.; new ICBC campaign targets bad driving habits

August 3, 2017

According to a new survey completed by Insights West, most drivers say that driving in the province has gotten worse in the last five years – pointing at bad driving behaviours as one of the top contributors to B.C.’s road problems.

Respondents feel that drivers today are more distracted, more aggressive and more impatient, making driving in B.C. more dangerous.

Despite this, the survey also found that 99% of all respondents considered themselves to be good or excellent drivers. Yet the same respondents:

  • incorrectly answered road test questions (over 3/4 of respondents, 78%, got at least one incorrect),

  • admitted to being an aggressive driver (1/5 of respondents, 18%),

  • said they might not follow road rules to make up time while driving (over 1/3 of respondents, 37%)

  • felt that it was OK to ‘bend the rules’ every once in a while if no other drivers were around (1/3 of respondents, 32%), and

  • confessed to driving in an emotional state at least some of the time (99% of all respondents).

ICBC has seen a marked increase in crashes in the last few years. The number of crashes across B.C. has jumped by 23 per cent in just three years – from 260,000 in 2013 to 320,000 in 2016. That’s an average of 875 crashes per day in the province.

To help combat this growing issue, ICBC is launching a new road safety campaign to encourage all drivers to reflect on their driving habits. The campaign will focus on many critical components to being a safe driver: our knowledge of the rules of the road, how we behave behind the wheel, and our attitude toward our responsibility as a driver. The campaign will include media advertisements, partnerships, public outreach and online resources, including an online quiz to help shine a light on areas where drivers may need improvement.

Quotes:

“Ultimately, our goal is to reduce the number crashes in B.C.,” said Mark Blucher, ICBC’s president and CEO. “Not only do crashes impact lives and cause serious damage, they also translate into costs pressures that affect insurance rates for all B.C. drivers. We’re asking everyone to help by doing their part through our Drive Smart campaign.”

“Ninety-six per cent of survey respondents were aware they have a critical role to play in improving the safety of our roads in B.C.,” said Mario Canseco, vice president of public affairs at Insights West. “This is a great starting point to open a dialogue with all drivers to take a look at their habits.”

Media contact:

Joanna Linsangan
604-982-2480

Don’t be a statistic: Over 2,400 crashes anticipated for the B.C. Day long weekend

Don’t be a statistic: Over 2,400 crashes anticipated for the B.C. Day long weekend

Drivers can expect more traffic on the road this weekend, with many people making local travel plans to enjoy the B.C. Day long weekend. But ICBC cautions drivers to remain vigilant during celebrations – over 2,400 crashes are anticipated during the upcoming long weekend.

And with many British Columbians setting out on a road trip, ICBC is reminding drivers to stay safe by giving large trucks and R.V.’s their space, especially on highways.

On average, there are over 500 crashes involving large trucks and 370 crashes involving R.V.’s in B.C. throughout the summer. Due to their sheer size and significant weight, crashes with trucks and other large vehicles are usually much more serious, with occupants of the smaller vehicle more likely to be seriously injured or killed.

ICBC offers the following tips to help prevent crashes with large vehicles:

  • Stay focused: Driver distraction is the top contributing factor in crashes involving large vehicles. Things like programming your GPS before leaving the driveway, asking a passenger to manage your texts and calls, and making sure children and pets are safely secured are surefire ways to ensure a smooth ride.

  • Allow space for roll backs: Heavy vehicles can roll back as far as 4.5 meters (15 feet) when stopped on a hill. If you’re stopped behind a truck, it’s best to give plenty of space between you and the truck ahead of you.

  • Drive out of blind spots: Keep clear of blind spots — there are large blind spots all around large vehicles, even in the front. When following, you should be able to see both mirrors of the R.V. or truck in front of you.

  • Leave more space to brake: If you’re passing a truck, remember to leave extra room before pulling back in. Trucks needs plenty of space to slow down – that’s why they leave lots of room in front of them. If you pull in too close, the truck driver may have to brake hard to avoid a crash (possibly jack-knifing in the process), or end up rear-ending you.

  • Have lots of space to pass: You need a lot of space when passing a large vehicle. Remember that trucks are long, with some pulling two trailers. Don’t pass unless you’re sure you have enough space. Remember it’s also the law to stay in the right lane except when you’re passing another vehicle.

  • Return the favour when merging: If a truck moves to the left lane to let you merge with traffic on a highway, slow down to let them return to the right lane in front of you. It helps them get out of the faster-moving left lane, and improves the flow of traffic.

  • Have a little patience: Although heavy vehicles have much more powerful engines than cars, they’re also much heavier, needing more time to reach the speed limit. If you’re following a slow-moving R.V. climbing up a hill, give them plenty of space with the understanding that they’re probably trying their very best to keep up with the flow of traffic.

B.C. Day long weekend statistics*:

  • Over the B.C. Day long weekend, five people are killed and 600 injured in 2,400 crashes throughout the province.

  • Over the B.C. Day long weekend, 420 people are injured in 1,500 crashes in the Lower Mainland.

  • Over the B.C. Day long weekend, 84 people are injured in 400 crashes in Southern Interior.

  • Over the B.C. Day long weekend, 20 people are injured in 130 crashes in northern B.C.

  • Over the B.C. Day long weekend, 85 people are injured in 350 crashes on Vancouver Island.

Large commercial vehicles and R.V. statistics:

  • There are over 500 crashes involving large commercial vehicles in B.C. throughout the summer.**

  • There are 370 crashes involving R.V.’s. in B.C. throughout the summer***

*Injured victims and crashes from 2015 ICBC data and fatal victims from police data five-year average (2010 to 2014).
**Average, 2011-2015 data for June, July and August.
***2009 – 2013 average for June, July and August. Includes motor homes, office trailers, house trailer, tent trailers and travel trailers.

Important information for ICBC customers affected by B.C.’s wildfires

With the province under a state of emergency due to the hundreds of wildfires in progress throughout B.C., ICBC is advising customers to protect their vehicles and important documents and to avoid driving near impacted areas.

For customers on evacuation alert:

  • Pack all essential ID and documents in preparation for an evacuation. These documents include your B.C. driver’s licence, B.C. identification card, B.C. Services Card, passport, original birth certificate, marriage certificate and Canadian citizenship documentation. It’s also a good idea to have a copy of your vehicle registration and Autoplan insurance policy.

  • Customers may purchase a temporary operating permit to move an uninsured vehicle to safety.

  • It’s not possible to purchase comprehensive or specified perils insurance coverage once you have been put on evacuation alert. However, once out of the evacuation zone, comprehensive or specified perils may be purchased for your vehicle.

For customers with claims:

  • Customers with insurance claims related to a fire will be dealt with on a priority basis. To make a claim, you can file online at icbc.com or call ICBC’s Dial-a-Claim at 1-800-910-4222, which is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

ICBC closures:

  • For updated service information, visit ICBC’s locator or call before visiting.

Vehicle coverage:

  • ICBC customers who have purchased a storage policy or comprehensive or specified perils coverage from ICBC, can be rest assured that their vehicles will be covered in the event of damage from a fire.

  • If you and your vehicle are not affected by an evacuation alert or evacuation order, you can purchase ICBC insurance without any fire-related restrictions. Comprehensive or specified perils insurance coverage is recommended.

  • Do not store valuables in your vehicle as these items are not covered by vehicle insurance.

For all other customers:

  • Autoplan brokers outside the evacuated areas remain open for business to support customers through these tough times.

  • ICBC’s customer service contact centre is available to answer questions at 1-800-663-3051.

  • Customers are reminded that if their insurance is about to expire, they can renew their policies up to a month before the expiration date.

Driving tips:

  • Avoid driving near affected regions. Forest fires can spread quickly. If a road is marked closed, do not continue. Back up and use another route.

  • For evacuation alerts and orders, check Emergency Info B.C.’s website. For road conditions, visit at DriveBC.ca

Wildfire situation in British Columbia and surrounding area: IBC is here to help – Safety remains first priority

July 8, 2017 (VANCOUVER) – As British Columbia has declared a state of emergency due to wildfires burning out of control throughout much of the Interior, Insurance Bureau of Canada (IBC) is reaching out with information and advice for those affected.

“Our thoughts are with those whose lives have been disrupted and whose homes have been destroyed. The priority right now is the safety of those affected and their loved ones,” said Aaron Sutherland, Vice-President, Pacific, IBC. “The insurance industry is here to help. Anyone with questions about their home or business insurance can call their insurance representative or IBC’s Consumer Information Centre at 1‑844‑2ask‑IBC.”

What insurance covers

Most home and business insurance policies cover fire damage. If residents have to leave their homes because of a mandatory evacuation order issued by civil authorities, most homeowner’s and tenant’s insurance policies will provide coverage for reasonable additional living expenses for a specified period of time. Your insurance representative is at the ready to clarify the details of your policy.

The claims process

If you have been affected by a wildfire, when safe to do so, take the following steps:

  • Assess and document the damage. Taking photos can be helpful.
  • Call your insurance representative and/or company.
  • List all damaged or destroyed items.
  • If possible, assemble proofs of purchase, photos, receipts and warranties. Take photos of the damage and keep damaged items unless they pose a health hazard.
  • Keep all of the receipts related to cleanup, and if you’ve been ordered to leave your home, keep the receipts for your living expenses.
  • Ask your insurance representative what living expenses you’re entitled to be reimbursed for and for what period of time.

Next steps

  • Once you have reported a loss, you will be assigned a claims adjuster. It may take some time, given the number of people affected by the wildfires, but you will be contacted.
  • The claims adjuster will investigate the circumstances of your loss, examine the documents you provide and explain the process. Take notes during the conversations and don’t be afraid to ask questions.
  • Your insurance company will ask you to complete a Proof of Loss form, to list the property and/or items that have been damaged or destroyed, with the corresponding value or cost of the damage or loss. You must sign and swear that the statements you make in the Proof of Loss form are true. Ask your insurance representative or claims adjuster to clarify anything you are unsure about.

Resources

Anyone with questions should contact their insurance representative or IBC’s Consumer Information Centre at 1-844-2ask-IBC.

For additional information, consumers can also visit www.ibc.ca  or email askibcwest@ibc.ca.

Understanding Cyber Threats, Monitoring Data Leakage & Monitoring Reputational Damage

Article by Aaron Baer

Organizations around the world were recently (and rather rudely) reminded of their data vulnerability when WannaCry unleashed its international ransomware attack that seized data remotely and demanded a ransom for its release. This attack provided an important reminder of the risks associated with data breaches and it forced many organizations to take a cold, hard look at their data protection strategies.

In light of this incident, there has arguably never been a better time for organizations to prioritize monitoring and managing digital risk. A recent report published by Digital Shadows (the “Report“) highlights the need for more sophisticated strategies as organizations’ digital footprints continue to expand at an overwhelming rate. As their digital footprints expand, organizations are exposed to new levels of external risk that are not adequately protected by traditional tactics.

A digital footprint is comprised of information left behind as a result of an organization’s or individual’s online activity – it exists outside the boundaries of internal protection. Employees, suppliers and many others with access to corporate data contribute to an organization’s digital footprint on a daily basis, and they (often unknowingly) expose sensitive information in the process.

While most information in the digital footprint is benign, there is a significant portion that is not. Threat actors focus on a subset called the ‘digital shadow,’ which includes exposed personal, corporate or technical information. Usually this information is highly confidential, sensitive or proprietary. Information left exposed in the digital shadow can be embarrassing for a company and can be leveraged by attackers looking to exploit, launch ransomware or other cyberattacks.

At the same time, organizations should be mindful that cyber-attackers are leaving their own digital footprints and digital shadows behind. The Report suggests that the most effective external digital risk management strategies involve monitoring this activity in order to gain insight and plan defensive strategies.

At a basic level, the Report suggests that external digital risk management requires identifying, assessing and taking steps to mitigate risk exposed by the digital footprint. More importantly, however, external digital risk management should involve: 1) understanding cyber threats, 2) monitoring data leakage, and 3) monitoring reputational risks.

Understanding Cyber Threats

According to the Report, tailored threat intelligence capability is the key to understanding cyber threats. Such intelligence should be premised on four main areas:

  1. Indications and warnings;
  2. Actor profiles;
  3. Campaign profiles; and
  4. Emerging tools.

In order to leverage threat intelligence, organizations should adapt their approach to their particular business. Further, they should focus on who the threat actors are, what they are planning, what tools they are using, and what tools may be developed in the future. Simply receiving generic information is not enough. Involving human analysts in the process, it is suggested, will help weed out irrelevant information and ultimately deliver capable and tailored intelligence.

Monitor Data Leakage

Organizations should be vigilant about monitoring data leakage, since attackers can use leaked data to their advantage. The Report suggests focusing on sensitive code, private encryption keys, employee credentials, confidential documents, intellectual property, and social media over-sharing. These areas of data leakage leave organizations particularly vulnerable, not only to attackers who seek to leverage this information in targeted cyber-attacks, but also to competitors and corporate espionage. Knowing the type of information leaked can provide insight into how the information might be used against you in the future.

Knowing when, where and how this information has been leaked is critical to implementing effective mitigation tactics. For example, if employees are leaking sensitive confidential information through the use of personal email or social media, organizations should be aware of this so that they can implement training and disciplinary procedures to counteract the behaviour.

Monitor Reputational Damage

Finally, the Report suggests that monitoring for reputational damage is a key component of effective external digital risk management. Organizations should be aware of ways by which their goodwill and branding are being leveraged online. According to the Report, the top five risk areas include:

  1. Phishing;
  2. Domain infringement;
  3. Spoofed profiles;
  4. Brand defamation; and
  5. Mobile application issues.

Being able to monitor and detect these activities can not only mitigate reputational damage, but also the negative impact on employees and customers.

In the context of cybersecurity, risk is a well-developed concept. The Report suggests that all risk management strategies should take into account external digital risks. As organizations continue to expand their global online presence and digital footprint, risk mitigation strategies must continue to evolve at the same pace.

As set out in another article recently published on The Spotlight, there are many ways to ensure your organization’s data is adequately protected in order to prevent costly data breaches. Organizations need to recognize the true scale of the cyberattacks they face, adapt to the changing landscape, and incorporate these best practices to protect their bottom line from the costs of data breaches.

The content of this article is intended to provide a general guide to the subject matter. Specialist advice should be sought about your specific circumstances.

Source: Mondaq

Know the Odds: The Cost of a Data Breach in 2017

Source: Security Intelligence: Larry Ponemon & Wendi Whitmore

We’ve all heard that when it comes to experiencing a data breach, the question is not if it will happen, but when. You may be wondering about the actual odds of it happening to your organization.

Think about it this way: The chances of being struck by lightning this year are 1 in 960,000. When it comes to experiencing a data breach, according to the Ponemon Institute’s “2017 Cost of Data Breach Study: Global Overview,” the odds are as high as 1 in 4. Therefore, organizations must understand the probability of being attacked, how it affects them and, even more importantly, which factors can reduce or increase the impact and cost of a data breach.

Rapid Response Drives Down the Cost of a Data Breach

Sponsored by IBM Security and independently conducted by the Ponemon Institute, the 12th annual “Cost of Data Breach Study” is out. The findings revealed that the average total cost of a data breach is $3.62 million in 2017, a decrease of 10 percent over last year. Additionally, the global average cost per record for this year’s report is $141, which represents a decrease of 11.4 percent over last year.

Despite the reduction in cost, the average size of a data breach increased by 1.8 percent to 24,089 records. The influencers that impact the cost of a data breach are driven by the country and the IT initiatives underway.

The good news is that organizations can take measures to minimize cost and impact. The 2017 “Cost of Data Breach Study” found that having access to an internal or outsourced incident response team has been the top cost-reducing factor for three years running. An incident response team typically accelerates the time frame in which security events can be contained, which is a significant factor in reducing the overall cost of a breach.

The IBM X-Force Incident Response and Intelligence Services (IRIS) team specializes in providing incident response planning, program development, remediation and threat intelligence to clients in over 133 countries. The team has experience responding to and helping to contain many of the largest data breaches in the world.

Five Steps to Accelerate Your Incident Response

Listed below are five additional tips to help accelerate your organization’s response to a breach.

  1. Speed to respond is critical. The more quickly you can identify what’s happened, what the attacker has access to, and how to contain and remove that access, the more successful you will be.
  2. Set up retainers in advance. In the event of a breach, an experienced team of incident response experts can help you quickly identify and contain the attack, and minimize costly delays.
  3. Access the data needed to answer investigative questions. Be prepared to provide responders with logs and tools to help them understand what happened. For example, what did the attackers access and what did they copy or remove from your environment?
  4. Mitigate the attacker’s access quickly. Plan with the IT staff in advance to understand how to be effective and efficient in a crisis. Consider the following:
    1. How to execute an enterprisewide password reset quickly;
    2. How to reset your service accounts; and
    3. How many of your service accounts have domain administrator credentials.
  1. Establish an internal communications plan. If you have to shut down parts of your environment or reset thousands of users’ passwords, your employees will have a lot of questions. This speculation can have critical ramifications, so it’s important to document a plan to ensure that your employees understand what they can and cannot share publicly.

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