ACL Survey Finds Government Agencies Underperform on Fraud Detection & Reporting

Source: PRNewswire

Less than one third in public sector say the majority of fraud is ever detected

Government agencies performed significantly worse than the business sector on fraud detection and mitigation, according to a new survey. Less than one third of government respondents said the majority of fraud is detected and less than half said fraud that is detected ever gets reported, compared to 42 percent and 60 percent of respondents from the commercial sector, respectively.

The 2017 Fraud Survey from ACL, a risk management software provider helping governments and companies around the world stamp out fraud, polled more than 500 audit, compliance and risk management professionals on anti-fraud practices.

“Fraud in government agencies is estimated to cost taxpayers more than $136 billion each year1, and that’s just from improper payments,” commented Dan Zitting, chief product officer at ACL. “While both the public and private sector need to enhance their anti-fraud practices, the relative underperformance by government agencies should be a major concern of elected officials and their constituents.”

The survey also found that less than 30 percent of anti-fraud recommendations are fully acted upon by government agencies, compared to about 40 percent in the business sector. Both government and business respondents said the primary reasons for the failure to take action is lack of time/resources or approvals. However, this leading reason fraud is allowed to go unchecked was reported by less than a quarter of respondents (21 percent) in corporate firms, compared to nearly 40 percent of public sector professionals.

“Having worked with a number of government agencies to help them stop fraud, we were surprised by the differences in fraud management found between government and business,” said Scott Robinson, director, public sector, ACL. “It is clear that the public sector remains highly susceptible to fraud, and that many agencies are neglecting to take the necessary action to fulfill the public’s trust.”

The Ultimate Selfish Driving Act

While out for a walk the other afternoon I approached a driver who had stopped in his lane, in a corner, to talk to a couple of pedestrians on the other side of the road. Normally, this is a relatively quiet street but the driver is still making a poor choice. His action was unsafe due to poor sight lines for approaching drivers.

Sure enough, another vehicle approached from behind and was prevented from passing because the pedestrians had moved into the other lane to conduct their conversation more comfortably.

At this point most drivers would conclude the conversation and move on, or at least move to the right side of the road.

Not this driver. He pulled into the oncoming lane at a forty-five degree angle and continued with the chat!

As it happened, I was also walking by a driver waiting beside his parked dump truck and watching this situation too. I shook my head and mentioned to him that there were sure a lot of inconsiderate drivers to be found on our highways these days.

I had definitely touched a raw nerve here as the driver began to tell me all about the dangerous driving situations that he is put into by the drivers of light vehicles every day.

Chief among his worries were those who changed lanes in front of his truck and failed to leave a safe margin for following distance. Worse still, some of these drivers will apply their brakes and slow down for a right turn immediately after moving over. No sense anticipating that turn and falling in behind the truck to safely prepare for it, is there?

Remember the two second rule? It not only applies to vehicles that you are following, it applies to vehicles that are behind you as well. Always leave yourself an out.

Why might this be important? A loaded heavy truck with a properly functioning braking system may have as little as half of the braking capacity of a car or light truck. These drivers may have put our trucker into a situation where he cannot slow or stop in time to avoid a collision.

I suggested that if there was nowhere safe to steer around the offending vehicle the truck driver might be faced with the decision to not to avoid the collision. No, he said, you would likely brake and finding that you could not stop in time automatically steer to avoid the crash.

Now there is little or no risk for our unthinking motorist and most or all of the risk settling onto the shoulders of our truck driver. This could be the ultimate selfish driving act performed by the driver of the light vehicle.

Before you start to complain about commercial drivers, think about the fact that in a collision between a heavy commercial vehicle and a light vehicle it is most likely that the fault lies with the light vehicle driver.

One parting piece of advice: remember the No Zone. This is the space around a heavy commercial vehicle where light vehicles are essentially invisible to the truck driver. Occupy them at your own risk!

#PracticeUp Saskatchewan – New drivers are the traffic safety spotlight for June

#PracticeUp Saskatchewan – New drivers are the traffic safety spotlight for June

May 31, 2017

SGI and Saskatchewan law enforcement will be focusing on new drivers and motorcycle riders throughout June. Police will be watching for new drivers and riders disobeying the restrictions under their respective Graduated Driver’s Licence (GDL) program.

“New drivers and riders have a lot to learn, so we encourage them to know what restrictions apply to them, take advantage of the courses offered and practice as much as possible to become a safe driver,” said Earl Cameron, Executive Vice-President of the Auto Fund. “One of the most important things for new drivers and riders to know is that there is absolutely zero tolerance for alcohol or drugs before driving. As they are still learning to drive, we want new drivers to be one hundred per cent focused on the task at hand.”

Between 2011 and 2015, drivers 19 years of age and younger represented seven per cent of Saskatchewan’s driving population, yet were involved in 11 per cent of all collisions. Young drivers also represented 10 per cent of drivers killed and 12 per cent of drivers seriously injured in a motor vehicle collision.

Here are some tips to keep in mind.

New Drivers

  • Take training – New drivers must take one of two training courses before attempting a Class 5 road test. High school students age 15 and up can take an SGI-sponsored program for free through their school division. Alternatively, those 16 and over can pay for a course offered by a certified driving educator.
  • Earn your privileges – The GDL program is designed to improve road safety by exposing new drivers of any age to incremental levels of risk as they gain more experience. There are three stages in the program: Learner (9 months), Novice 1 (6 months) and Novice 2 (12 months).
  • Know your restrictions – There are requirements for a supervising driver, limits on how many passengers you can have, hours you can drive, and other considerations. These restrictions are loosened as drivers advance through the stages of the GDL program.

New Riders

  • Take training – Motorcycle training is highly recommended and makes financial sense. New riders entering the Motorcycle GDL program who do not pass a certified motorcycle safety course pay a $500 surcharge on their licence as they enter each stage. But if they pass a course, that surcharge is waived – plus, if they graduate incident-free, they receive a $450 rebate, which is roughly the cost of the course.
  • Earn your privileges – The Motorcycle GDL program for new motorcyclists has the same Learner, Novice and Novice 2 stages.
  • Know your restrictions –There are restrictions when it comes to passengers and time of day when riding is allowed. There are also specific requirements for wearing protective gear and displaying an ‘L’ or ‘N’ placard on the licence plate indicating learner or novice rider.

Tough Consequences

  • For both GDL programs, depending on the incident, the result could be a ticket, loss of licence and/or loss of points under the Safe Driver Recognition (SDR) program. Generally speaking, the consequences of failing to comply with a licence endorsement/restrictions result in a fine of $150 and three demerits.
  • For both GDL programs, there is a zero alcohol/drug tolerance level for new drivers, as well as any driver/rider (new or experienced) age 21 and under. First-time offenders will lose their licence for 60 days, lose four points under SDR and have the vehicle seized and impounded for three days, plus pay for towing, storage, and a DWI course.
  • New drivers and riders are not allowed to use any type of cellphone while driving – neither hand-held nor hands-free. The fine is $280 and four demerit points. New drivers/riders caught using their cellphone while driving (distracted driving) for the second time within one year will have the vehicle they are driving seized for seven days.

Rules to live by

  • Practice, practice, practice! And practice exactly the way you were taught by your certified instructor.
  • If you’re going to drink, don’t drive. If you’re going to drive, don’t drink.
  • Know and follow all restrictions outlined on your licence.
  • Gradually expose yourself to different weather conditions and times of day.
  • If you have questions about the road test or the rules of the road, #AskAnExaminer on social media or email askanexaminer@sgi.sk.ca.
  • Supervising drivers should visit the SGI website and review the latest editions of the Saskatchewan Driver Handbook and read A Guide to Supervising New Drivers. Some things may have changed since they got their licence.

View more information on new impaired driving laws and consequences. Follow SGI on Facebook and Twitter for safety tips to #TakeCareOutThere.

Top 10 Worst Roads in Ontario. Did your road make it to the list? #ONWorstRoads

The votes are in and Ontario’s Worst Road for 2017 is Burlington Street East in Hamilton.

Taking the second and third place spots on CAA’s annual list are Dufferin Street in Toronto and Lorne Street in Sudbury. Burlington Street East has risen progressively higher up the top 10 list since it first appeared on the CAA Worst Roads list in 2009. Dufferin Street has made nine appearances on the provincial top ten list since the campaign’s inception.

“With Burlington Street East attaining the top spot on this year’s CAA Worst Roads list, it is a clear message by voters that this road isn’t meeting the needs of residents,” said Raymond Chan, government relations specialist, CAA South Central Ontario (CAA SCO). “We look forward to discussing the results of this year’s list with elected officials and municipal staff from across the province in the coming months.”

“I hope that CAA’s spotlight will spur some much-needed improvement on Burlington Street East and the many other Hamilton roads that require immediate attention,” said Paul Miller, MPP (Hamilton East—Stoney Creek). “We must invest in the repair and maintenance of our existing infrastructure as well as in building new transport connections. People depend on this road to be safe.”

Over 3000 roads were nominated from across the province this year, the highest number since the campaign’s inception.

“Once again this year, we see evidence that regular maintenance required to extend road life, in many cases isn’t being done,” said Geoff Wilkinson, chief operating officer, Ontario Road Builders’ Association (ORBA). “In other instances, roads are simply at the end of their life-cycle. While many municipalities see the importance of investing in maintenance and reconstruction of roads and bridges, CAA’s Worst Roads campaign reminds us that many municipalities still have a long way to go in addressing their infrastructure deficit.”

Ontario’s Top 10 Worst Roads for 2017

1. Burlington Street East (Hamilton)

2. Dufferin Street (Toronto)

3. Lorne Street (Sudbury)

4. Maley Drive (Sudbury)

5. Queenston Street (St. Catharines)

6. Algonquin Boulevard West (Timmins)

7. Hunt Club Road (Ottawa)

8. TIE – Carling Avenue (Ottawa) AND Duckworth Street (Barrie)

9. TIE – Algonquin Boulevard East (Timmins) AND Yonge Street (Toronto)

10. County Road 49 (Prince Edward County)

Worst Roads by Region

  • Central – Duckworth (Barrie)
  • Eastern – County Road 49 (Prince Edward County)
  • Halton-Peel-YorkDurham – Highway 7 (Markham)
  • Niagara – Queenston Street (St. Catharines)
  • North – Lorne Street (Sudbury)
  • South West – Plank Road (Sarnia)
  • Western – Northfield Drive West (Waterloo)

The top five roads in Toronto are: Dufferin Street at number one followed by Yonge Street, Bathurst Street, Eglinton Avenue West and Finch Avenue West.

“We have seen a significant shift this year in the top five Worst Roads in Toronto,” continued Mr. Chan. “Bayview Avenue received more votes than any other Toronto road in 2016 but did not return this year, while Finch Avenue West and Bathurst Street appear for the first time. This year’s list also features Eglinton Avenue West which is undergoing significant construction in preparation for the Crosstown LRT.”

The CAA Worst Roads campaign is a platform for Ontarians to make roads safer by helping municipal and provincial governments understand what roadway improvements are important to citizens, and where they need to be made.

For the full list of 2017 Worst Roads please visit caaworstroads.com.

About CAA South Central Ontario
As a leader and advocate for road safety and mobility, CAA South Central Ontario is a not-for-profit auto club which represents the interests of over 2 million members. For over a century, CAA has collaborated with communities, police services and governments to help keep drivers and their families safe while travelling on our roads.

SOURCE CAA South Central Ontario

SEC Issues Cybersecurity Alert For Brokers And Financial Advisers

Article by Peter Stockburger

On May 17, 2017, the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), through its National Exam Program, issued a “Risk Alert” to broker-dealers, investment advisers and investment firms to advise them about the recent “WannaCry” ransomware attack and to encourage increased cybersecurity preparedness. The purpose of the alert, according to the SEC, was to “highlight for firms the risks and issues that the staff has identified during examinations of broker-dealers, investment advisers, and investment companies regarding cybersecurity preparedness.”

Based on a 2015 survey of 75 SEC registered broker-dealers, investment advisers and investment firms, the SEC National Exam Program staff recognized certain firm practices that registrants may find relevant when dealing with threats such as the WannaCry ransomware attack:

  • Cyber-risk Assessment: Five percent of the broker-dealers, and 26 percent of the investment advisers and investment companies examined “did not conduct periodic risk assessments of critical systems to identify cybersecurity threats, vulnerabilities, and the potential business consequences.”
  • Penetration Tests: Five percent of the broker-dealers, and 57 percent of the investment companies “did not conduct penetration tests and vulnerability scans on systems that the firms considered to be critical.”
  • System Maintenance: All broker-dealers, and 96 percent of investment firms examined “have a process in place for ensuring regular system maintenance, including the installation of software patches to address security vulnerabilities.” And only ten percent of the broker-dealers, and four percent of the investment firms examined had a significant number of critical and high-risk security patches that were missing important updates.

The SEC recommends registrants undertake at least two separate tasks: (1) assess supervisor, compliance and/or other risk management systems related to cybersecurity risks; and (2) make any changes, as may be appropriate, to address or strengthen such systems. To assistant registrants, the SEC highlights its Division of Investment Management’s recent cybersecurity guidance, and the webpage of the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA), which has links to cybersecurity-related resources.

The SEC cautions that the recommendations described in the Risk Alert are not exhaustive, “nor will they constitute a safe harbor.” Factors other than those described in the Risk Alert may be appropriate to consider, and some factors may not be applicable to a particular firm’s business. Moreover, future changes in laws or regulations may supersede some of the factors or issues raised in the Risk Alert. Ultimately, the “adequacy of supervisory, compliance, and other risk management systems can be determined only with reference to the profile of each specific firm and other facts and circumstances.”

The SEC recognizes that it is not possible for firms to anticipate and prevent every cyber-attack. However, “appropriate planning to address cybersecurity issues, including developing a rapid response capability is important and may assist firms in mitigating the impact of any such attacks and any related effects on investors and clients.”

Dentons is the world’s largest law firm, a leader on the Acritas Global Elite Brand Index, a BTI Client Service 30 Award winner, and recognized by prominent business and legal publications for its innovations in client service, including founding Nextlaw Labs and the Nextlaw Global Referral Network. Dentons’ global Privacy and Cybersecurity Group operates at the intersection of technology and law, and was recently singled out as one of the law firms best at cybersecurity by corporate counsel, according to BTI Consulting Group.

About Dentons

Dentons is the world’s first polycentric global law firm. A top 20 firm on the Acritas 2015 Global Elite Brand Index, the Firm is committed to challenging the status quo in delivering consistent and uncompromising quality and value in new and inventive ways. Driven to provide clients a competitive edge, and connected to the communities where its clients want to do business, Dentons knows that understanding local cultures is crucial to successfully completing a deal, resolving a dispute or solving a business challenge. Now the world’s largest law firm, Dentons’ global team builds agile, tailored solutions to meet the local, national and global needs of private and public clients of any size in more than 125 locations serving 50-plus countries. www.dentons.com

The content of this article is intended to provide a general guide to the subject matter. Specialist advice should be sought about your specific circumstances. Specific Questions relating to this article should be addressed directly to the author.

For more information, visit our Privacy and Cybersecurity blog at www.privacyandcybersecuritylaw.com

ICBC urges drivers and cyclists to watch out for each other

With crashes involving cyclists peaking during the summer, ICBC is urging drivers and cyclists to take extra care on our roads as we near Bike to Work Week (May 29 to June 4).

As ridership increases in the summer, so does the number of cyclist-related crashes. In B.C., 740 cyclists are injured and seven are killed in car crashes from June to September every year. That means six cyclists are injured every day during the summer months in B.C.*

“We sponsor Bike to Work Week as an opportunity to educate both drivers and cyclists alike,” said Lindsay Matthews, ICBC’s director responsible for road safety. “It’s part of our commitment to support programs in communities throughout the province. Whether you’re on a bike or in a car, please look out for each other and share the road.”

ICBC has invested approximately $1.75 million in 124 cycling-related road improvement projects in B.C. from 2014 to 2016.

Tips for drivers:

  • Don’t get distracted. Watch for cyclists on the road and make eye contact if you can, so they can anticipate your next move.

  • Yield the right-of-way. Yield to cyclists and signal well in advance if you need to cross a designated bike lane or pull over to the side of the road.

  • Look out. Shoulder check for cyclists before turning right and watch for oncoming cyclists before turning left. Scan for cyclists before you enter the roadway from an alley or get in and out of a parking spot.

  • Dooring is dangerous. Both drivers and passengers must shoulder check for cyclists before opening doors. Not only will it keep cyclists safe, it will help you avoid a dooring violation and fine too.

  • Keep a safe distance. Maintain at least three seconds behind cyclists and at least one metre when passing a cyclist. Don’t risk side-swiping or running a cyclist off the road.

Tips for cyclists:

  • Start at the top. Wearing an approved bicycle helmet that meets safety standards is the law in B.C. and you could be fined for not wearing one. Focus on how it fits: it should be snug, but not uncomfortable, and should not be able to roll off of your head when the chin strap is secured.

  • Reflect on safety. Be extra visible with reflective gear on your bicycle pedals and wheels.

  • Bike lanes are best. Use designated bike routes whenever possible – they’re safer and reduce conflicts with vehicle traffic. Check your local municipality’s website for designated bike routes or visit TransLink.ca for maps of cycling routes in Metro Vancouver.

  • Stay off the sidewalk. If there’s no bike lane, keep to the right-hand side of the road as much as it’s safe to do so. It’s illegal to ride on most sidewalks and crosswalks. It puts pedestrians in danger and drivers don’t expect cyclists to enter the roadway from a sidewalk.

  • Follow the rules of the road. Make sure you obey all traffic signs and signals and rules of the road.

  • Use caution around parked vehicles. Be aware of people in vehicles as well as taxis to avoid getting hit by an opening door. It’s best to keep at least once metre away from parked vehicles.

  • Shoulder check. Before making any turns, shoulder check and hand signal in advance. Remember, drivers sometimes fail to yield right-of-way.

For more information about cycling, and videos about these tips visit our cycling safety page on icbc.com.

ICBC has been investing in road safety education since 1976 and providing community grants since 2008. Our Community Grants Program supports community organizations with their road safety and injury recovery initiatives.

Regional statistics:*

  • In the Lower Mainland, on average, 1100 cyclists are injured and five killed every year.

  • On Vancouver Island, on average, 310 cyclists are injured and three killed every year.

  • In the Southern Interior, on average, 160 cyclists are injured and three killed every year.

  • In the North Central region, on average, 28 cyclists are injured every year.

*Based on a five-year average using 2011 to 2015 police fatality and ICBC injury data.

​​Media contact:

Lindsay Olsen​
604-982-4759

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