These are Ontario’s Worst Roads for 2018

These are Ontario’s Worst Roads for 2018

By Kelly Roche  Source: inbrampton
The votes are in, and Ontario’s Worst Road for 2018 isn’t too far from home.

What’s the rush, Saskatchewan? 4,873 drivers caught speeding in April

SGI NEWS RELEASE: 

There were 4,873 tickets for speeding and aggressive driving issued by police during the April Traffic Safety Spotlight on speeding.

Whoa, that’s a lot of speeders. One might say those numbers “quickly” added up.

Lame jokes aside, it’s time to #SlowDown, Saskatchewan. Excessive speed is one of the leading factors in traffic-related deaths and injuries. If you speed, you’re more likely to get into a collision, and the faster your speed, the worse the collision.

Remember: speeding tickets in Saskatchewan got more expensive as of May 1. The base fine on all speeding tickets has increased by $30 and the km/h charge for travelling in excess of the posted speed has doubled.

What do these increased speeding fines look like? Exceeding the speed limit by 20 km/h on a regular street or highway triggers a total fine of $190, including the Victims of Crime surcharge and km/h charges. In a school zone, 20 km/h over the limit costs you $310. If you speed past workers in a 60 km/h orange zone, you’ll shell out $440 for going 80, and $1,008 for going 100!

So leave a little earlier, ease off the accelerator and keep your money in your pocket. (Besides, you’re definitelygoing to be late if you get pulled over, right?).

Police also issued tickets for other traffic infractions* including:

  • 516 distracted driving offences (426 for cellphone use)
  • 269 impaired driving offences (including 265 Criminal Code charges.)
  • 323 offences regarding seatbelts/child car seats

Police continue to focus on impaired driving throughout May. Remember, impaired is impaired. In Saskatchewan, it’s currently illegal and will continue to be illegal to drive under the influence of drugs or alcohol, even once marijuana use becomes legal in Canada later this year.

 

Follow SGI on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram for safety tips to #TakeCareOutThere.

 

* Includes all traffic safety focus results for April 2018 submitted by police as of May 17, 2018.

BC SPCA reminds public not to leave animals in hot cars

With the recent warm weather and several calls already received by the BC SPCA about animals in hot cars, the animal welfare society is again, reminding people to leave their pets at home if they can’t keep them safe.

Cars can become death traps in 10 minutes

“People don’t realize just how quickly their cars can become death traps for their pets – it can take as little as 10 minutes for the vehicle to reach temperatures where the animal can suffer irreparable brain damage or death,” says Lorie Chortyk, general manager of community relations for the BC SPCA.

“We know that if people are taking their pets with them, it’s because they love them and want to spend time with them, but we really do encourage pet guardians to please, leave their pets at home when they’re going out in the car.”

What to do if you see a dog in distress in a parked vehicle:

  • Note the license plate and vehicle information and ask managers of nearby businesses to page the owner to return to their vehicle immediately;
  • Is the animal in distress? Call your local animal control agency, police, or the BC SPCA hotline at 1-855-622-7722 as soon as possible. Note: It is illegal for members of the public to break a window to access the vehicle themselves; only RCMP and Special Provincial Constables of the BC SPCA can lawfully enter a vehicle. SPCA branch staff and volunteers cannot enter vehicles.
  • Keep emergency supplies – bottled water, a small bowl, a towel that can be soaked in water- in your car so that you help hydrate an animal (if a window has been left open) while you wait for emergency response; a battery-powered fan from a dollar store also can be handy to circulate air.

Dogs can’t release heat by sweating

In just minutes, the temperature in a parked car can climb to well over 38 degrees Celsius (100 degrees Fahrenheit). Dogs have no sweat glands, so they can only cool themselves by panting and by releasing heat through their paws, which they cannot do in a vehicle that has become an oven, she notes. Dogs can withstand high temperatures for only a very short time – in some cases just minutes – before suffering irreparable brain damage or death.

Pet guardians should be alert to heatstroke symptoms, which include: exaggerated panting (or the sudden stopping of panting), rapid or erratic pulse, salivation, anxious or staring expression, weakness and muscle tremors, lack of coordination, convulsions or vomiting, and collapse.

If your dog shows symptoms of heatstroke, you should do the following:

  • Immediately move the animal to a cool, shady place
  • Wet the dog with cool water
  • Fan vigorously to promote evaporation. This will cool the blood, which reduces the animal’s core temperature.
  • Do not apply ice. This constricts blood flow, which will inhibit cooling.
  • Allow the dog to drink some cool water (or to lick ice cream if no water is available)
  • Take the dog to a veterinarian as soon as possible for further treatment.

“Your dog will be much happier – and safer – at home, with shade and plenty of fresh cool water,” Chortyk says. “It is such a preventable tragedy.”

If people see a dog in a hot car who they think is in distress, they should call municipal animal control authorities or local law enforcement immediately.

Woman drove 62 km/h over limit with 2 kids in car, Hamilton police allege

HAMILTON _ Police say a woman faces charges after allegedly driving 62 kilometres an hour over the posted speed limit with two young children in the car.

Hamilton police say an officer clocked the vehicle at 142 km/h in an 80 km/h zone early Wednesday morning.

They say an officer first noticed the car travelling at high speed and passing slower traffic.

Police say it had reached 142 km/h before they were able to catch up and make a traffic stop.

They say the driver, a 35-year-old woman from Cambridge, Ont., had two small children with her.

She is charged with stunt driving, speeding and driving without insurance.

ICBC warns: long weekend brings more crashes

As drivers hit the road this Victoria Day long weekend, police will be conducting a province-wide enforcement blitz to target high-risk driving behaviours to keep B.C. roads safe as part of a month-long campaign.

High-risk driving behaviours, like speeding, increase your risk of crashing. That’s why ICBC, police and Speed Watch volunteers are urging drivers to slow down. We all have a part to play in keeping our roads safe—if we want everyone else to drive smart, we first need to start with ourselves.

Over the Victoria Day long weekend, 490 people were injured in 1,900 crashes in B.C. in 2016. On average, two people are killed every year over the weekend.*

ICBC’s top five tips:

  • Plan your route and check road conditions at drivebc.ca before you leave.

  • Be realistic about travel times and accept delays that may arise. Don’t rush to make up time – slow down to reduce your risk of crashing and arrive at your destination safely. You also save fuel by driving at a safe and steady speed.

  • Don’t speed up as someone is trying to pass you. Help the other driver get back into your lane by slowing down and making room.

  • Stay focused and avoid distractions that take your mind off driving and your eyes off the road. Distracted driving is one of the most common causes of crashes so remember to take a break from your phone.

  • With more motorcyclists on our roads now, allow at least three seconds following distance when you’re behind a motorcycle. At intersections, the safest choice is to yield the right-of-way to an oncoming rider as it can be hard to tell how fast they’re travelling. Remember, you only see motorcycles when you really look for them.

Regional statistics*:

  • Over the Victoria Day long weekend, 330 people were injured in 1,200 crashes throughout the Lower Mainland in 2016.
  • Over the Victoria Day long weekend, 52 people were injured in 290 crashes throughout the Vancouver Island in 2016.
  • Over the Victoria Day long weekend, 69 people were injured in 270 crashes throughout the Southern Interior in 2016.
  • Over the Victoria Day long weekend, 38 people were injured in 140 crashes throughout the North Central region in 2016.

*Victoria Day long weekend is calculated from 18:00 the Friday prior to Victoria Day to midnight Monday. Injured victims and crashes from 2016 ICBC data. Fatal data based on five year average from police data (2011 to 2015).

April ice storm caused more than $190 million in insured damage

The costs of insured damages from extreme weather across Ontario continue to rise. Insurance Bureau of Canada (IBC) reports that the mid-April ice storm that affected Southern Ontario resulted in more than $190 million in insured damage, according to Catastrophe Indices and Quantification Inc. (CatIQ).

The storm brought strong winds, flooding, heavy snow and ice build-up.  The vast majority of claims occurred in Ontarioincluding the Greater Toronto Area.  CatIQ has reported more than 15,000 insurance claims including 1,800 car collisions due to the storm.

Insurance companies are on the frontlines of extreme weather events and play a vital role in helping homeowners and communities recover more quickly. Extreme weather associated with climate change is affecting Canadians now. It has gone from a future threat to a present danger. Canadians are feeling its effects across the country and on the bottom lines of many businesses and organizations.

“Insured losses from storms such as this one are increasing rapidly,” said Kim Donaldson, Vice-President, Ontario, IBC. “A generation ago, insurers paid out – on average – about $400 million a year in today’s dollars across Canada on weather-related costs. Now that number often tops $1 billion a year, and sometimes it goes much higher.  This past year in Ontario alone, CatIQ has tracked over $600 million in insured damage from weather-related events.”

IBC reminds consumers that because of changing spring weather conditions, it is vital to know what your policies cover and whether your home insurance policy includes overland flood protection, which remains a continuing threat with the spring runoff. Check with your insurance representative to see what options are available. For more information on how to protect property against severe weather, floods and other disasters, visit IBC’s website.

About Insurance Bureau of Canada
Insurance Bureau of Canada (IBC) is the national industry association representing Canada’s private home, auto and business insurers. Its member companies make up 90% of the property and casualty (P&C) insurance market in Canada. For more than 50 years, IBC has worked with governments across the country to help make affordable home, auto and business insurance available for all Canadians. IBC supports the vision of consumers and governments trusting, valuing and supporting the private P&C insurance industry. It champions key issues and helps educate consumers on how best to protect their homes, cars, businesses and properties.

P&C insurance touches the lives of nearly every Canadian and plays a critical role in keeping businesses safe and the Canadian economy strong. It employs more than 120,000 Canadians, pays $9 billion in taxes and has a total premium base of $52 billion.

For media releases and more information, visit IBC’s Media Centre at www.ibc.ca. Follow IBC on Twitter @InsuranceBureau or like us on Facebook. If you have a question about home, auto or business insurance, contact IBC’s Consumer Information Centre at 1-844-2ask-IBC.

About CatIQ
Catastrophe Indices and Quantification Inc. (CatIQ) delivers detailed analytical and meteorological information on Canadian natural and man-made catastrophes. Through its online subscription-based platform, CatIQ combines comprehensive insured loss indices and other related information to better serve the needs of the insurance and reinsurance industries, the public sector and other stakeholders. To learn more, visit https://www.catiq.com/.

SOURCE Insurance Bureau of Canada

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