Chubb Launches Proprietary Online Cyber Risk Index

Chubb, a leader in cyber risk assessment and underwriting, has launched its Chubb Cyber IndexSM, a new interactive platform that showcases nearly two decades worth of Chubb’s proprietary commercial cyber claims data. The Index is designed to highlight a range of cyber threats based on an organization’s industry and size.

“We’re thrilled to offer businesses throughout North America this interactive capability to provide insight into real threats facing them on a daily basis,” said Bill Stewart, Division President of Chubb’s Global Cyber Risk practice. “The first step to protecting a business from a cyber attack is staying aware of what threats are most prominent to a company’s size and industry. Our Cyber Index will help users to better understand their exposures and manage risk before a cyber incident occurs.”

The innovative Index provides users with a simple and immediate means of identifying the leading cyber risks their business may face based on real-world examples of cyber attacks and data breaches. With a user-friendly interface, accessible via desktop or mobile device, users are able to set parameters unique to their company, and view historical trends based on type of threat, size of a company and which industry that company operates within.

“Chubb has nearly two decades of cyber claims data, which enables us to help clients gain insight into the types of events affecting their industries,” said Michael Tanenbaum, Executive Vice President, Chubb.  “That insight has helped us to monitor the evolution of the marketplace and understand various threats and how they impact different businesses, based on their profile.”

Along with delivering key intelligence to businesses of all sizes, the Index will be updated biweekly, and ultimately will deliver real-time data.

“As cyber risks evolve, Chubb will continue to focus and respond to the environment by its strong commitment to the industry and by providing best-in-class solutions to clients,” said Mr. Tanenbaum.  “In the meantime, organizations of all sizes need to proactively assess current procedures in place to mitigate the risk from potential cyber-attacks, and ensure that their cyber insurance policy is structured to addresses any gaps.”

The Index is free to access and can be used at http://www.chubb.com/cybermedia.

About Chubb:
Chubb is the world’s largest publicly traded property and casualty insurance company, and the largest commercial insurer in the United States. With operations in 54 countries and territories, Chubb provides commercial and personal property and casualty insurance, personal accident and supplemental health insurance, reinsurance and life insurance to a diverse group of clients. As an underwriting company, we assess, assume and manage risk with insight and discipline. We service and pay our claims fairly and promptly. The company is also defined by its extensive product and service offerings, broad distribution capabilities, exceptional financial strength and local operations globally. Parent company Chubb Limited is listed on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE: CB) and is a component of the S&P 500 index. Chubb maintains executive offices in Zurich, New York, London and other locations, and employs approximately 31,000 people worldwide. Additional information can be found at: chubb.com.

SOURCE Chubb

‘Um… no’: Zuckerberg protects his own privacy in testimony

Even Mark Zuckerberg has limits on what he’s willing to share.

In a rare light-hearted exchange during his public grilling before U.S. senators Tuesday, the Facebook CEO told Sen. Dick Durbin that no, he would rather not share personal details of his life with the U.S. Congress.

“Mr. Zuckerberg, would you be comfortable sharing with us the name of the hotel you stayed in last night?” asked Durbin, an Illinois Democrat.

“Um… no,” Zuckerberg said after pausing, then smiled as the room laughed.

“If you’ve messaged anybody this week, would you share with us the names of the people you’ve messaged?” Durbin continued.==

“Senator, no, I would probably not choose to do that publicly here,” Zuckerberg replied.

“I think that maybe is what this is all about,” Durbin said.  “Your right to privacy. The limits of your right to privacy and how much you give away in modern America in the name of quote, ‘Connecting people around the world.”’

Durbin was among many senators who grilled Zuckerberg on what the social network collected on its users, following revelations that the Donald Trump-affiliated data mining firm Cambridge Analytica scooped up data on millions of Americans without their knowledge.

B.C. takes new approach to testing older drivers, some ask if ageism a factor

By Dirk Meissner

THE CANADIAN PRESS

VICTORIA _ Frank Harding is 98 years old and most days he drives his 1990 Volvo sedan to the Comox Recreation Centre where he works out.

One summer, the resident of Courtenay, B.C., said he drove across Canada four times from Vancouver Island to New Brunswick to visit relatives, although he doesn’t drive that much any more.

But Harding said he recently faced the prospect of losing his driver’s licence under a revamped driver reassessment program geared at drivers in B.C. once they reach 80 years old, which has raised questions about age discrimination.

Harding, who learned to drive tractors on family farms and trucks during the Second World War, said he was told to take a road test after undergoing a government-ordered driving fitness exam by his doctor.

“I went and I didn’t do so good on my medical,” said Harding. “So, he wanted me to have a road test, so I went and had a road test and I came through with flying colours.”

In March, the B.C. government introduced its Enhanced Road Assessment program, which is the second stage of its fitness testing program for driver’s licences. It replaced the former DriveABLE program, which drew criticism from seniors for its reliance on computer tests and road tests in unfamiliar vehicles.

RoadSafetyBC, the government agency responsible for road safety, mandates every person at age 80, and every two years following, must undergo a Driver Medical Examination Report. The report serves as the primary tool for the assessment of conditions that may affect someone’s fitness to drive.

Harding, who has been through several driver fitness exams since he turned 80, said this was the first time he had to take a road test. He agreed it was time to retest his skills, but he said his life would have changed if he lost his licence.

“I think it’s a good idea,” he said. “I think it’s a very good thing.”

B.C.’s seniors advocate Isobel Mackenzie said the new testing program is less daunting for seniors, but she is concerned about targeting drivers just because they are 80 years old.

“Why are we doing it based on age and who picked age 80?” she asked.

Driving regulations based on age vary across Canada.

In Alberta, drivers 75 and older must file a medical report from their doctor every time they renew their licence. There are no age restrictions in Saskatchewan, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island or the territories.

Ontario has a Licence Renewal Program that starts at 80. In Quebec, drivers must submit a physician’s report when renewing their licence at age 75, age 80 and every two years following.

Steve Wallace, a long-time owner of a driving instruction business, said the new program in B.C. is much more comfortable for seniors who can now take the exam in their own vehicles and no longer face the test on a computer.

But why not look at a driver’s record rather than age when considering testing for fitness, he said.

“When every other segment of society is judged on their record, then this group of people should be judged on their record,” he said. “There’s an extreme prejudice against seniors. This is blatant age discrimination.”

Recent data from RoadSafetyBC suggests not every driver asked to take the enhanced road test is 80 or older.

To date, the agency said it has referred about 1,700 drivers for assessment. About 1,100 of them were 80 or older.

The agency said it processes about 60,000 medical exams for drivers who are 80 and older annually.

Last year, about 3,450 drivers who were 80 and over took the previous DriveABLE assessment. Of those drivers, 1,400 were found medically fit to drive and 550 were found medically unfit and had their licences cancelled. Another 1,250 drivers had their licences cancelled for non-compliance and 250 voluntarily surrendered their licence, the RoadSafetyBC data says.

Mackenzie said the numbers of drivers voluntarily surrendering their licences increases as they age.

At 65 years old, 95 per cent of drivers have their licences, but at age 84 only 34 per cent of people have their driver’s licences, she said.

Making Bad Drivers Pay

Last week we looked at how we might define a bad driver. Views were varied, but there were two well thought out responses that did more than just express an opinion. This week, let’s look at how bad drivers pay for the risk that they present to others using our highways.

At the top of the list is the Criminal Code of Canada. Part 8 deals with offences against the person and reputation. Here we find homicidecriminal negligence and motor vehicles, vessels & aircraft. These are reserved for the worst of the worst offenders and convictions may result in significant fines and / or time in jail.

Our Motor Vehicle Act and it’s associated Regulations create the framework of rules that we are supposed to follow when we drive. Disobey one of these and you might receive a violation ticket with a prescribed fine. The fine amount should reflect the seriousness of the offence, the more dangerous the act, the higher the fine.

There are some problems with this system. First among them is that the fine may be a life altering penalty for those with no financial means and the bite of a gnat for those with significant resources.

Yes, the court system exists to reduce the penalties to be more fair in the circumstances, but my experience there is that those of limited means seldom take advantage of it. Also, there is no provision to increase the fine beyond the prescribed fine in traffic court.

Some countries use a Day Fine system where the penalty is based on the offenders daily income level to make the penalty more appropriate.

If the circumstances are out of the ordinary but do not call for criminal sanctions, the offending driver may be served with an appearance notice instead of a violation ticket. A provincial court judge will hear the case and may apply a variety of penalties on conviction. These may range from probation orders to fines, prohibitions from driving and jail sentences.

The second problem that comes to mind is the high threshold for sanction of experienced bad drivers in the Driver Improvement Program.

Additions to the penalty system include the Immediate Roadside Prohibition program (IRP) for alcohol and drug impaired drivers and the Vehicle Impoundment program for the IRP, excessive speeding, driving while unlicensed, prohibited or suspended, stunting and not being seated properly on a motorcycle.

The Driver Penalty Point Premium is based on driving convictions and paid to ICBC each year. The more penalty points you are assigned, the more you pay. This part of the Motor Vehicle Act Regulations is overdue for revision. A red light conviction is 2 points, as is parking next to a yellow curb if you are ticketed for disobeying a traffic control device.

The Driver Risk Premium is meant to penalize drivers who have shown that they present a significant danger others through a driving related Criminal Code conviction, a 10 penalty point violation, excessive speeding or a distracted driving conviction.

If you are an at fault driver in a collision, you will either lose your safe driving insurance discount or the possibility of forgiveness should you experience another at fault collision.

Finally, the courts, RoadSafetyBC in Part 2 or the roadside prohibition requirements of Part 4 of the Motor Vehicle Act serve to remove driving priviliges entirely as a penalty.

This is quite an array of possibilities, isn’t it? With all of this in place, one wonders why there are still so much bad driving behaviour on our roads.

What All Canadian Sports Organizations Can Learn From Ontario’s “Concussion Law”

Today’s guest post comes from B.C. injury claims lawyer Erik Magraken

As detailed at my second site, combatsportslaw.com, Ontario recently passed a ‘concussion law’ which will impact all sports organizations in the Province.

While the law has no bearing outside of Ontario’s borders it’s requirements likely will prove influential instructing th

e standard of care when personal injury lawsuits are filed alleging negligence against sports organization that fail to take proper measures in response to athlete concussions.

The legislation requires all sports organizations (a term broadly defined) along with coaches and other key personnel involved in the oversight of amateur sport to be familiar with concussions, to implement a concussion protocol discussing when athletes must be removed from play and when concussed athletes are ok to return to play.  The law further requires these organizations to educate athletes (and in the case of minors, their parents) about the realities of concussion.

The law does not appear to have any enforcement mechanisms however that does not mean it is meaningless.

This law likely sets the framework that courts would adopt when asked whether sports organizations are negligent when athletes are concussed.  If a sports organization anywhere in Canada fails to have meaningful concussion protocols in place and further fails to follow these protocols successful litigation framed in negligence very well may follow.

If you are involved in the oversight of amateur sport becoming familiar with and following the Sport Concussion Guidelines published by the Ontario Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport is a wise idea.

Illegal home builders put buyers at risk!

Press Release:

Tarion Warranty Corporation is recognizing Fraud Prevention Month with a strong warning to consumers that an illegally built home in Ontario may come with devastating consequences, including a home that may be unsafe to inhabit or a builder who, once paid, abandons the project altogether.

“When it comes to the largest investment of a family’s life, namely a newly built home, it pays to know that your builder has the technical and financial wherewithal to complete the job and that you have the protection of a warranty if anything goes wrong,” said Howard Bogach, Tarion’s president and CEO. “If builders are not registered with Tarion, they are building illegally and won’t provide warranty protection that is legally required in Ontario.”

Bogach emphasized that every builder in Ontario must be registered with Tarion and must enroll all newly built homes in the warranty program. It’s the law. And almost all municipalities across Ontario are supporting it by sharing their building permit information with Tarion. An additional 15 municipalities have partnered up with Tarion to educate consumers who opt to take out permits in their own names as opposed to using a builder licensed by Tarion.

Illegal builds are more than just a bad idea. They can be expensive for homeowners and builders alike. Last year, for example, Ontario provincial courts set down 117 convictions related to illegal building, and illegal builders paid almost $400,000 in fines for proceeding without proper registration, warranties, or permits. In 2016, one builder even went to jail.

Bogach expects this price tag to increase in 2018 because the fines themselves have increased. Beginning in 2018, builders found in violation of the law will face fines up to $50,000 – up from $25,000 – as well as imprisonment for one year, less a day (twice the previous jail time). Corporations building new homes will face the heaviest penalties with maximum fines of $250,000, up from the previous $100,000. Even directors and officers of these delinquent companies are subject to penalties up to $50,000.

For the homeowner, risks are also high. Unregistered builders do not necessarily comply with Ontario Building Code specifications and the new owner can fall victim to poor craftsmanship, including such dangerous and costly elements as electricity and plumbing. There is also the risk that an illegal builder will take a buyer’s deposit and then abandon the build.

In keeping with its mandate of consumer protection, Tarion advises prospective buyers of new homes to recognize the following signs that a builder may be operating illegally. Builders:

  • Say they built the house for themselves but then decided to sell it.
  • Say they offer their own warranty and the homeowner doesn’t need Tarion’s warranty.
  • Say the Tarion warranty is too costly (sometimes quoting $10k when in fact the maximum cost is $1800 plus taxes.)
  • Offer the consumer a brief contract or, worse, no contract at all.

About Tarion Warranty Corporation

For more than 40 years, Tarion has been enhancing confidence in the new home buying experience. Tarion is a private, not-for-profit corporation that administers the Ontario New Home Warranties Plan Act, and backstops the warranty coverage. We set the standards for builder licensing and after-sales service and step in when your builder cannot or will not fulfill the warranty obligations. Since 1976, Ontario’s new home warranty program has registered close to two million homes and paid put hundreds of thousands of dollars in warranty claims. Our mandate is to serve the public interest, and is what guides us every day.

SOURCE Tarion Warranty Corporation

www.tarion.com

 

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