5 million claimants expected benefit from reduction of Employment Insurance waiting period

The Government of Canada is commited to help the middle class and  those working hard to join it. As a result of changes made on January 1, 2017, the waiting period for Employment Insurance (EI) benefits has been cut to one week. Reducing the waiting period  provides more money for EI-eligible individuals when they become unemployed or leave work temporarily due to health or family pressures. By October 1, 2019, about five million cumulative claimants will have benefitted from this change.

Today, the Honourable Jean-Yves Duclos, Minister of Families, Children and Social Development, announced that this change has resulted in an estimated additional $650 million dollars a year.

For example, for an eligible claimant who is laid off, and subsequently finds work after 12 weeks, the change means that up to 11 weeks of EI benefits will be payable whereas only up to 10 weeks were payable in the past. The reduction of the waiting period applies to all types of EI benefits—regular, fishing, sickness, maternity, parental, compassionate care, Family Caregiver benefits.

This is just one part of the Government of Canada’s recent actions to provide workers, parents and caregivers with more flexible, inclusive and easier to access EI benefits. These include:

  • making the default rules of the most recent Working While on Claim pilot project permanent and extending them to EI maternity and sickness benefits;
  • providing a choice of duration of parental benefits;
  • providing additional weeks of EI regular benefits to eligible seasonal claimants in 13 targeted regions; and,
  • providing more opportunities for eligible EI claimants to upskill and enhance their employability while still receiving EI benefits.

Finally, new parental sharing benefits that provide additional weeks of benefits to families when parents of a newborn or newly adopted child share parental benefits will be available starting in March 2019.

Quote
“Every Canadian’s situation is unique. By providing support sooner, we are ensuring middle class families has the money they need, when they need it the most.  We are making EI caregiving, maternity and parental benefits more flexible, inclusive and easier to access, we are providing hard-working middle-class Canadian families with more options to better balance their work and life responsibilities.”
– The Honourable Jean-Yves Duclos, Minister of Families, Children and Social Development

Quick Facts

  • The reduction in the waiting period does not affect the speed of the first payment. The current standard of providing payment within 28 days, 80 percent of the time, continues to apply.
  • About two-thirds of claimants return to work before using all their weeks of entitlement.
  • The 2019 EI premium rate will be $1.62 per $100 of insurable earnings—a decrease of 4 cents for employees compared to the 2018 rate and an effective decrease of 5 cents for employers, who pay 1.4 times the employee rate.
  • It is estimated a cumulative total of about 2.2 million claimants would benefit from the Working While on Claim measure as of October 1, 2019.
  • The pilot project aimed at assisting seasonal workers is expected to help approximately 51,500 EI seasonal claimants annually.
  • With Skills Boost,it is estimated that about 7,000 adult learners per year will take advantage of the expansion of EI options to take training while continuing to receive EI benefits.

Associated Link

Reducing the two-week waiting period to one week

Employment Insurance Improvements

ILScorp is Hiring: Learning Management Specialist / Developer

ILScorp is Hiring: Learning Management Specialist / Developer

Job Summary:

We are looking for a Learning Management System (LMS) professional to help our team oversee and maintain our server infrastructure and proprietary LMS system. This person will develop provided LMS content and create traditional PHP/Java based web services to implement into our global LMS strategy. The Learning Management Specialist shall provide technical best practices and recommendations to programmers and instructional designers for loading content onto the Learning Management Systems and will provide production and development support as a key member of the IT team.

Candidate must be a quick learner and be able to work effectively both independently and in a team environment. The ideal candidate will be a highly motivated, enthusiastic, self-starting team player.

Qualifications:

  • Must have experience with PHP, HTML, and/or JavaScript
  • Microsoft SQL or MySQL Database knowledge required
  • Effective  interpersonal and communication skills, both verbally and in writing
  • Excellent Problem-solving skills, analytical and organizational skills and demonstrates close attention to detail

 

Job Description:

  • Troubleshooting online course content and various LMS related issues
  • Upgrade existing applications for efficiency and usability with new modifications
  • Publish new courses and updating existing course content
  • Build/upgrade Web applications according to client needs
  • Design and implement web-specific applications/tools for LMS administration
  • Document procedures, technical instructions and business knowledge
  • Troubleshoot WordPress related issues
  • Run custom database queries according to client needs using standard SQL tools
  • Manage Windows Server applications and troubleshoot same
  • Maintain employee email management via Microsoft Exchange Server
  • Troubleshoot any network related issues both internally and externally

 

Desired Skills:

  • Experience with various programming languages
  • LMS Proficiency
  • Understanding of Software developing life cycles (SDLC)
  • Strong understanding of programming logic/workflow, and data population
  • Experience in data analysis, SQL, and object-oriented programming languages
  • Full Stack, Object-Oriented, API experience, etc., not required but strong plus

 

Company Description:

ILS Corp is an industry leader in Canada providing internet based insurance training. Building on more than two decades of live insurance training, in 2000, ILS Corp went online with ilscorp.com and became the first independent organization to offer online continuing education and insurance licensing preparation training. In 2007, ILS Corp offered the first insurance education courses in a video-streaming format. Today, ILS Corp continues to be the insurance training course provider of choice for more than 21,000 Canadian insurance professionals.

We are a company built on a deep network of expertise and our IT teams are extremely skilled at creating progressive solutions in an ever-changing field of online education.

Location: Comox, BC
Job type: Full Time

Wage: TBA – Based on experience
Work hours: 8:30 am to 5 pm – Monday to Friday with some after-hours support

 

Please email resume and cover letter to careers@ilscorp.com

 

Employment insurance recipient list falls to lowest level since 1997

OTTAWA _ Statistics Canada says the number of people collecting employment insurance in April fell to the lowest level in at least 21 years.

The federal agency says 453,100 people received the regular wage insurance payments in April, down 100,200 or 18 per cent since April 2017, and the lowest number since comparable data became available in 1997.

The reduction in beneficiaries was reflected in every province and coincides with a reduction in the national unemployment rate from 6.5 per cent to a record low of 5.8 per cent over same 12-month period.

StatsCanada also points out there was real gross domestic product growth in every province in 2017 for the first time since 2011.

The agency says the sharpest year-over-year decline in EI recipients took place in Alberta, where the 56,300 people collecting benefits was down nearly 29 per cent from a year earlier.

Other provinces with big declines included Quebec, down 24 per cent; British Columbia, 22 per cent; and Ontario and New Brunswick, each down by 16 per cent.

Changes in the number of beneficiaries are affected by the number of new claims, recipients who go back to work and the number who have exhausted their benefits.

This course is included as part of your ILS General CE and/or Adjuster CE Course Subscription

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‘OK Google, find me a job’: New job search feature launches in Canada

‘OK Google, find me a job’: New job search feature launches in Canada

TORONTO _ Google has launched its job search feature in Canada.

The feature appears within its existing search engine, when users type in queries including “jobs near me”, “summer jobs”, “government jobs”, “work from home jobs” or “jobs in Canada”.

Once a user searches one of the terms or a similar work-related query, Google will offer webpages it determines are job postings.

The postings can be filtered to view opportunities based on the commute distance, job title and time commitment.

Users will also be able to save their job searches and set up email notifications to be alerted as soon as new postings appear.

The job search function was first piloted in the U.S. and India.

Google’s philanthropic arm is also giving $1 million to Toronto’s MaRS innovation hub to develop an employment platform that will launch next year and aims to help workers navigate the changing job market.

Tips On The Right Way To Fire Employees In Ontario

Article by Andrew N. Vey

Dismissing an employee is not a pleasant experience. But whether you like it or not, this is one task that most businesses will encounter at some point. As President Trump reminded us again this week after reports surfaced that Secretary of State Rex Tillerson learned of his firing by way of a twitter post, there is both a right way and a wrong way to conduct employee terminations.

Ontario courts have recognized that employees are particularly vulnerable at the time of dismissal. As such, it is vital that employers carefully plan for any termination of employment. While there is no fixed formula for this process, here are a few tips that employers should bear in mind when approaching their next employee termination:

  • Ensure confidentiality and privacy: No employee should be forced to endure their dismissal from employment in a public setting. As such, be sure to keep the details of an employee’s termination as private as possible. Other than those directly involved, no other workers should learn of the employee’s dismissal prior to the event or be provided with any more than minimal information (i.e. person X no longer works with the company) after the dismissal. Termination meetings should be conducted in a private and discrete location away from the ordinary course of business. In addition, holding a termination meeting later in the day may also help avoid any unnecessary embarrassment for the worker.
  • Be brief and to the point: In so much as possible, try to keep termination meetings short. Termination meetings are by their very nature charged affairs so the longer they go on, the more potential there is for stress and confrontation. It can be helpful to prepare a brief script in advance to make sure you remember the topics that need to be covered in an efficient manner.
  • Have a witness and make notes: It is helpful to have at least two members of management, or human resources, attend at any termination meeting. This proactive step can be useful in the event that there is a future dispute as to what occurred in the course of the dismissal meeting. Essentially, the second employer representative is there to act as a witness. Additionally, as soon as the termination meeting is concluded, both employer representatives should immediately draft, sign and date notes as to what transpired in the termination meeting.
  • Be ready for the inevitable question “why?”: In almost every termination meeting, the employee in question will want to know why they are losing their job. While most provincially-regulated employers in Ontario are not required to give a reason when dismissing an employee without cause, as a matter of best practice, it is generally advisable to provide an answer. Not knowing why they are out of work will not only frustrate the employee but may precipitate legal action which could otherwise have been avoided. In giving a reason for the dismissal, be truthful and succinct.
  • Prepare a termination letter: There can be a lot of details involved in the dismissal of an employee. Issues range from severance to benefits coverage to accrued vacation (just to name of few). Having a written termination letter will help to ensure that all this information is addressed clearly and concisely for the employee and avoid misunderstandings about the employer’s position. It is common that employees will not hear or remember events in a termination meeting past the words “we’re letting you go” so having a written record of the terms of the dismissal can be of vital importance to the employee.
  • Be sensitive: When ending a worker’s employment, try to be as supportive and considerate as possible. Listen to their feedback and watch the employee’s mood and reactions. If they seem particularly distraught, offer to call a family member or cab to help them get home. Likewise, you can offer to have their effects packed up and sent to them if they don’t want to collect things personally. Where possible, avoid escorting the worker out of the workplace under guard after the meeting (but do keep an eye on them to ensure nothing improper happens). Finally, if the worker is known to be aggressive or volatile, make arrangements in advance to have security available should they need to called into the meeting and consider the safety of other staff members in carrying out the termination.
  • Don’t force decisions in the meeting: If you are making the employee a settlement offer in exchange for a release of claims against the employer, avoid having the employee decide on the spot. Even if they offer to sign immediately, it is generally best practice to advise them to go away and think about things. Should they wish to accept the employer’s offer, timelines and methods for doing so should be laid out clearly in the termination letter.

The above list is by no means exhaustive. Each employee dismissal will come with its own unique circumstances and challenges. However, with sufficient planning, organization and sensitivity to the employee, it is possible to get through the dismissal process in respectful fashion, while avoiding the creation of problems that may later come back to haunt the employer.

Originally published on March 16, 2018 at First Reference Talks.

The content of this article is intended to provide a general guide to the subject matter. Specialist advice should be sought about your specific circumstances.

Source: Mondaq

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