#BullyingAwarenessWeek: How Should Managers Deal With Workplace Bullies?

anti-bullying-courses

If a manager or supervisor is told that one employee is bullying another, they must address the issue. But before company leaders can confront the person responsible, they need to identify that bullying has indeed taken place and confirm the facts. The following is a basic three-step plan of action:

Step 1: Identify what is considered bullying in the workplace. Workplace bullying can be described as repetitive, deliberate verbal, non-verbal and even physical actions directed against a co-worker or subordinate for the sole purpose of dominating and controlling. Such behaviour is damaging and can result in severe psychological or physical harm to the victim.

Step 2: Confirm the facts and develop a plan to confront the bully. Once bullying has been identified, it is the supervisor/manager’s responsibility to confirm the facts, prepare documentation, and develop a plan to confront the bully. Confirming facts will help you understand the extent of damage that may have been done to the victim. If there are enough facts to confront the bully, prepare a plan.
Consult any appropriate partners such as human resources personnel and determine what consequences – anything from written discipline to termination – may be considered. The plan must be sensitive to the needs of the victim, who may need support through an employee assistance program.

Step 3: Schedule a meeting to confront the bully. Determine the time and location of the meeting, as well as who will be involved, and prepare a script. In a private space, facilitate the following conversation:

  • Explain the purpose of the meeting. In a clear and assertive tone, explain that the employee has been linked to bullying and that this conversation is to address that. For example: “John, I have asked to meet with you to discuss the following facts … and our position on this matter. Do you understand why you’re here?”
  • Verify with the employee why they are there. This gives the individual time to understand the seriousness of the conversation and allows the leader to evaluate how the employee is going to manage their emotions. If the employee or leader becomes overly emotional, stop the conversation and start again only when everyone is calm.
  • Present the facts and concerns, and outline the consequences. This is to ensure that the employee understands that this is not a negotiation; it’s a reporting of the facts. The ultimate goal is for the employee to accept responsibility for his or her actions. Facts: “John, you were observed … ” (Share the facts, history, evidence and the organization’s position.) Concerns: “John, bullying behaviour is not acceptable in this organization and it will not be tolerated. Do you understand the concern and expectation to stop any behaviours that could be perceived as bullying?” Employee’s response: Give the employee a chance to admit responsibility, ask questions about what they need to do, show remorse, apologize and commit to changing their behaviour. Consequences: Inform the employee how the matter will be dealt with. A union representative may need to be involved.
  • Frame an action plan. Outline the steps the employee must comply with to continue their employment. “John, the first step is to stop bullying X immediately. You will be expected to …” Leave nothing to assumption. Get the employee to agree to those expectations.
  • Review the plan. Review the expected behaviour, how the plan will be monitored, any disciplinary action, the impact on the employee’s record, future consequences if there is a relapse, and the frequency of follow-up. A written plan may help the employee follow the guidelines.

Effective leaders must embrace the challenge of making sure their workplace is free of bullying. ILScorp offers additional resources to help both employers and employees prevent and manage bullying in the workplace, and ensure compliance with workplace legislation.

Ontario, Manitoba, Québec and Saskatchewan have already introduced legislation against bullying and B.C. recently enacted Bill 14 [Workers Compensation Amendment Act] to address the effects of bullying at work. Become compliant with existing laws. Complete ILScorp’s “Understanding Workplace Bullying & Tools for Safeguarding an Organization from Bullying Behaviour” courses.

This course is included free of charge as part of ILScorp your group subscription. This course is General and Adjuster CE accredited, however ILScorp recommends that all employees receive this training for law compliance.

Excerpted from the Globe and Mail, written by Bill Howatt, the president of Howatt HR Consulting and founder of TalOp, in Kentville, N.S.

Excerpted article from ILScorp’s Blog

Stay tuned to the latest in Insurance news by subscribing to ILStv’s daily or weekly newsletters.

#BullyingAwarenessWeek: Are you compliant with the anti-bullying laws?

#BullyingAwarenessWeek: Are you compliant with the anti-bullying laws?

Ontario, Manitoba, Québec and Saskatchewan have already introduced legislation against bullying and B.C. recently enacted Bill 14 [Workers Compensation Amendment Act] to address the effects of bullying at work.

Become compliant with existing laws. Complete ILScorp’s “Understanding Workplace Bullying & Tools for Safeguarding an Organization from Bullying Behaviour” courses.

With these anti-bullying courses you will:

  • determine whether a problem exists in a workplace
  • learn how to prevent incidents
  • gain tools for safeguarding your organization from bullying behaviour
  • develop a workplace bullying prevention program

This course is included free of charge as part of your ILS General CE Course Subscription. This course is General and Adjuster CE accredited. However, ILScorp recommends that all employees receive this training for law compliance.

Read More Here: 

Why would you want to work in insurance?

ILScorp.com

Looking for a solid career that won’t require a multi-year college degree?

The insurance industry may be just the right place for you.

People may not think of insurance as the most glamorous industry in Canada, but it does offer stability, challenge and growth to those who choose the profession.

It’s an incredibly diverse and gratifying career choice, with huge scope for personal fulfilment, network building, professional development and of course financial reward. A career in insurance will take you as far as you want to go.

Insurance is already a huge part of everyday modern life, so why not find your career in it!

Become a Level 1 General Insurance Sales Agent without spending thousands of dollars or committing to years of schooling with ILScorp’s new Level 1 General Insurance Licensing Program.

With just 80 to 120 hours of self -study time, you can obtain your Level 1 License and begin your new career in the insurance industry.

Level 1 Licensing Program

ILS L1 Program has all the learning material you need in one package.

The ILS L1 Program includes an online video course, hardcopy textbook, and workbook; each organized into easy to manage chapters. Utilizing all three learning elements enable you to listen to the content as it is narrated in the video course, follow along in the textbook, and enforce your knowledge retention by answering questions on key concepts in the workbook. At the start of each chapter in the online video course, you will be introduced to the main topic and learning points and told the desired outcomes.

Cut through the jargon – Understand Insurance

Key concepts are expressed using real life scenarios and examples; you won’t need a translator or dictionary to learn the material.

L1.General.Insurance.FLASHCARDS-1

Test yourself – again, and again and again….

End of chapter quizzes can be taken as many times as you wish and you can test yourself on the go with the L1 mobile flashcards with over 100 exam type questions. The L1 workbook has 650 questions along with answer keys plus the practice final exam will set you up to experience the actual online licensing exam scenario.

Your online Level 1 General Insurance Licensing Exam – yes it’s actually included!

As you may be in shock we’ll say it again. Your online Level 1 General Insurance Licensing Exam comes with your L1 Program. It’s included in the cost of the program and completed entirely online. Once you successfully pass the L1 Final Exam you’ve done it! Congratulations! You can now apply to your provincial insurance council to receive your Level 1 General Insurance License.

To learn more about the ILS Level 1 General Insurance Licensing Final Exam CLICK HERE

Level 1 Final Licensing Exam available for residents in BC, SK and MB.

Source: www.ilscorp.com

Back-to-School on a Budget

Back-to-School on a Budget

CNW – August 29, 2016 – The euphoria of back-to-school shopping has begun, and many Albertans will spend thousands of dollars and a countless amount of time in shopping malls across the province. With creative television commercials and many other diverse marketing tactics, big-box retailers have refined their arts in making sure every message captures the attention of consumers just like the holiday shopping season.

According to retailmenot.ca, Canadian parents will spend approximately $472 on their children for 2016 back-to-school season. With the state of Alberta’s economy and the uncertainty, Money Mentors advises Albertans to be prudent with their finances and stick to the budget when shopping for back-to-school. To avoid overspending and not put a dent in their finances, here are some ways students and parents can curtail their spending:

  1. Check Current Inventory — As simple as this seems, there may be a surprising number of supplies already in your home from last year’s purchases. Your child may have also brought home unused school supplies from the previous school year. Make sure you check your closets and drawers for these supplies first.
  2. Create a budget — Creating and sticking to a budget based on your current financial position and back-to-school needs will help you to remain in control of your overall finances. When creating your budget you need to consider your income, monthly financial responsibilities, savings, emergency funds and other incidental payments. Heading out shopping with a realistic budget will limit you from overspending when back-to-school shopping.
  3. Only buy needs — You do not need the coolest or fastest laptop if you can’t afford it. At Money Mentors, we believe that the key to controlling spending and being in charge of your hard-earned money is about deciding on what to spend and not to spend.
  4. Don’t pay full price — Shopping around gives the best bang for your buck and there are countless retailers offering great discounts. Compare the best deals in flyers, in-store discounts, and online. Keep in mind that you do not have to buy everything new. Used textbooks, resources from your local library, clothing from consignment stores and items from buy and sell websites such as Kijiji.ca are often as good as new.
  5. Use cash — Pay with cash when shopping in stores and stay away from credit cards if possible. Generally speaking, cash limits you from being talked into buying the next level up item or adding features you do not need. Cash can limit your ability to overshop, and allows you to buy what you have only budgeted for. Additionally, using cash constantly prompts you about your spending and also protects you from impulse buying while shopping.
  6. Buy in bulk with a friend — Per item cost is often much cheaper at warehouse stores such as Costco; however, you will often end up with more than you need and can quickly overspend. By teaming up with one or more friends to purchase necessary items together, you can take advantage of warehouse prices without breaking your budget.

At Money Mentors, we counsel parents and students that they do not need the coolest gadgets or newest designer clothes to be a successful in school. What they need is a realistic budget and discipline, which will lead to wise financial decisions. Parents also have an opportunity to teach their children wise spending habits by adhering to these guidelines.

About Money Mentors
Money Mentors is the only Alberta-based, not-for-profit credit counselling agency. Through a number of services, we help families and individuals recover from financial crisis and move forward. From credit counselling and money coaching to retirement planning and community financial literacy, we are contributing to a healthier financial future for the entire province.

TD survey finds that high costs have half of post-secondary students sitting on the sidelines versus playing the game

Read more

RBC poll reveals gap in students’ expectations on key life moments

Read more

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Join our mailing list to receive the latest news and updates from ILSTV

You have Successfully Subscribed!

Pin It on Pinterest