The most stolen vehicle models in Manitoba

WINNIPEG | CTV News

WINNIPEG — Vehicle theft may seem like a random act of crime, but the vehicle you drive can play a big part in the likelihood of it being stolen.

According to Manitoba Public Insurance (MPI), here are the most stolen cars in the province:

  1. Ford F150 (9.0 per cent of thefts)
  2. Chevrolet Silverado (5.0 per cent of thefts)
  3. GMC Sierra (4.7 per cent of thefts)
  4. Dodge Ram (4.4 per cent of thefts)
  5. Dodge Grand Caravan (4.1 per cent of thefts)

Four of the top five vehicles stolen in Manitoba are trucks.

HOW TO STOP YOUR CAR FROM BEING STOLEN

It’s a cold morning in Manitoba; you run outside and start your car to warm it up. When you go back outside to leave for work, you see your car is missing.

It’s one of the most common scenarios where vehicle thieves steal cars according to MPI.

The insurance company estimates 90 per cent of car thefts are related to the use of keys. IE: Keys left in the ignition/hidden in the vehicle, or stolen from the owner.

Ninety-nine per cent of vehicles in Manitoba are equipped with an approved immobilizer, but the immobilizer is disengaged upon the use of keys, or key fobs.

The message: protect your keys.

THE IMPACT ON YOUR WALLET

The Insurance Bureau of Canada says car theft costs Canadians close to $1 billion annually.

Every year, insurance companies shell out over $540 million to replace or fix stolen vehicles.

Police, healthcare and court system costs tally $250 million.

More important to the average driver, there’s also the increased cost of insurance for owning one of the cars on the list.

 

OACP team up with IBC & Accident Support Services International to stop thefts & valuables left in plain view

HAMILTON, ON, Dec. 4, 2019 /CNW/ – Ontario’s police leaders are teaming up with the Insurance Bureau of Canada (IBC) and Accident Support Services International to warn motorists to Lock it OR Lose it when it comes to securing their vehicles and valuables this holiday season.

The Ontario Association of Chiefs of Police (OACP) has launched its annual Lock It OR Lose It campaign, which encourages drivers and passengers to take precautions to protect their vehicles and contents from theft, particularly during the holiday season. The campaign was kicked off at the Lime Ridge Mall in Hamilton.

“The holiday season should be about spending time with our families and friends. Our message is simple: don’t let would-be thieves play the role of Bad Santa by stealing your vehicle or valuables left unsecured. Keep things such as GPS and mobile devices, laptops, shopping bags, money, and credit cards out-of-sight as a way in deter criminal activities.” said OACP President Chief Paul Pedersen.

This year’s Lock it OR Lose it campaign is being launched during the holiday season because it’s easy for people to be distracted and leave their vehicles unlocked or valuables in plain sight during the festive hustle-and-bustle. Police will use Lock it OR Lose it notices throughout the year as part of on-going crime prevention efforts.

“About 236 motor vehicles are stolen in Canada every day. That’s 86,132 incidents per year. In Ontario alone, almost 24,000 vehicles were reported stolen,” Bryan Gast, the IBC’s National Director, Investigative Services. “Although we’ve seen increases in recent years, the rate of motor vehicle theft in Canada last year was 38% lower than in 2008. But it doesn’t mean we can drop our guard. In fact, we need to be more vigilant than ever.”

According to Gast, today’s auto thieves are turning to technology – and vehicles’ electronic systems – to bypass security systems and steal vehicles. Electronic auto theft is on the rise as more vehicles are equipped with technology such as keyless entry fobs. In fact, the insurance industry has seen the growing trend that thieves are able to copy FOB information and steal cars right from your driveway.

During local Lock it OR Lose it outreach initiatives by police services throughout the year, police officers, auxiliary officers, and crime prevention personnel examine parked vehicles to confirm they are locked and that no valuables are left in plain view. A small notice is placed on vehicles checked – not just ones that are found unsecured – advising what safety precautions may have been neglected and offering simple prevention tips for drivers to protect their vehicles against theft. The notices congratulate drivers who have secured their vehicle.

Motorists are urged not to keep personal documents such as vehicle ownership, liability pink slips, credit card invoices or other documents containing personal information in their vehicles. Identity thieves are looking for such documents so they can assume identities, secure credit card accounts, lease vehicles for export, and even take out a mortgage against victims’ properties without their knowledge.

#LockItOrLoseIt

The Lock it OR Lose it Campaign is supported by a number of OACP partners:

Accident Support Services International

arrive alive/DRIVE SOBER

Insurance Bureau of Canada

The OACP also supports arrive alive/Drive Safe’s  #HolidayRide Campaign http://www.arrivealive.org/

SOURCE Insurance Bureau of Canada

www.ibc.ca

Canada: What To Know About Left-Turn Accidents

Article by Gluckstein Personal Injury Lawyers

What to know about left-turn accidents

Traffic accidents always come down to a blame game and the person making the left turn is often in the wrong. About half of all crashes at Canadian intersections involved a vehicle that was turning left, according to a 2007 joint study by the Traffic Injury Research Foundation and the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.

With so many claims stemming from those incidents, the Insurance Bureau of Canada considers all left turns into traffic that lead to an accident, as against insurance company policy.

Before trying to beat the light and making an ill-advised left turn, here are some things drivers should consider:

Different types of insurance

Insurance companies always deem someone at fault in cases of accidents. The fault could be partial or full depending on the circumstances. Individuals deal with their own insurance companies, regardless of who caused the accident. No-fault insurance allows a person to receive part or full coverage by their company regardless of who caused the accident. They can receive medical and other benefits without having to track down the other driver and take them to court. They are also eligible even if they are deemed to have caused the accident.

Proving who’s at fault

Insurance companies determine fault by analyzing accident reports. Therefore, if the other driver committed a traffic violation as well, such as speeding or running a red light, there is room for adjustment. Adjusters can “split the fault” in these situations, instead of the full liability for the driver turning left.

As a driver, proving what happened at the time of the accident is crucial in determining your eligibility for an insurance claim. First-hand witness accounts are helpful in constructing the scene before and after the accident.

An impartial witness is ideal to corroborate your story, especially if you claim that the other driver was at fault.

The content of this article is intended to provide a general guide to the subject matter. Specialist advice should be sought about your specific circumstances.

Source: Mondaq

These are the 10 most stolen cars in Quebec this year

Basem Boshra CTV News Montreal

MONTREAL — The Insurance Bureau of Canda has released its annual list of the most stolen cars in Canada, and in Quebec, the Top 10 list consists of just two makes: Lexus and Toyota.

According to the IBC, these are the 10 most stolen cars in Quebec in 2019:

  1. 2018 Lexus RX350/RX350L/RX450h/RX450hL 4DR AWD
  2. 2018 Lexus NX300/NX300h 4DR AWD
  3. 2017 Lexus RX350/RX450h 4DR AWD
  4. 2016 Lexus RX350/RX450h 4DR AWD
  5. 2017 Toyota HIGHLANDER 4DR 4WD
  6. 2018 Toyota HIGHLANDER 4DR 4WD
  7. 2015 Toyota PRIUS V 5DR
  8. 2017 Lexus NX200t/NX300h 4DR AWD
  9. 2015 Lexus NX200t/NX300h 4DR AWD
  10. 2016 Toyota Highlander 4DR 4WDd

 

4 scams to watch out for this holiday season

Frauds, scams spike this time of year, says RCMP

CBC News

As shoppers gear up for the holiday season, police say fraudsters are also preparing to take advantage of those who aren’t careful.

The holidays are ripe for fraudulent activity, with various types of scams appearing around this time of year, according to Jeff Thomson, a senior intelligence analyst with the RCMP’s fraud unit.

Here are some of the most common scams Thomson said people should watch out for.

SIM swapping

Thomson said the RCMP has seen a recent spike in identity theft through what’s known as SIM swapping.

Fraudsters will send a phishing email, which appears to be from your service provider, offering you free data or something similar — and a link for you to claim your “prize.”

The link asks for personal information to update your cellular account profile. Fraudsters will then contact your service provider and, using that information, gain access to your phone.

“If you have your bank accounts, your social media accounts, email accounts — they can now start to gain access to the accounts you have on your mobile device,” Thomson said.

If you receive an email from your service provider with an offer, Thomson recommends calling them to verify it’s real.

Evolving phone scams

This one might sound familiar: someone allegedly calls from the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) and demands payment for back taxes while threatening the victim with arrest.

Thomson said the RCMP are seeing a spike in these kinds of scams, but instead of the CRA, the fraudsters claim to be from Service Canada.

“The Service Canada scam I’m seeing as the evolution of the CRA scam,” Thomson said.

Fraudsters tell victims their social insurance number (SIN) is compromised and then attempt a two-part scam.

First, they’ll attempt to coax your name, date of birth, SIN and other personal information from you.

Then they’ll say police or investigators need to follow up, which later turns into a demand for cash. Thomson said that usually takes the form of fraudsters telling victims to move money into a “safe account.”

Like with the CRA scam, Thomson said Canadian agencies wouldn’t call and ask for personal information.

Online shopping scams

As more and more shoppers turn to the internet to find that perfect holiday gift, fraudsters are taking notice.

Thomson said one scam comes in the form of an unbelievable offer for a wish-list item — but often it’s counterfeit or of an inferior quality.

To avoid being duped, Thomson recommends only shopping at well-known websites, reading reviews on lesser-known ones first, and using payment programs that have credit card protection.

“If a deal seems too good to be true, it probably is,” he said.

Loan scams

This scam typically preys on victims looking for extra cash during the holidays.

Fraudsters offer loans, Thomson said, and then either take personal information or begin to demand payments.

Thomson advises people to be cautious and only seek loans from credible providers.

CBC News

 

Cornwall, Ont., woman loses life savings to terrifying ‘SIN scam’

Scammer posing as RCMP investigator bilked Julia-Shea Baker of $4K

The excerpted article was written by Laura Osman · CBC News ·

A Cornwall, Ont., woman has lost all her money after falling victim to a scam the RCMP are calling the top identity fraud in Canada.

Julia-Shea Baker, a 23-year-old server, lost $4,000 to the “SIN scam,” a new version of the Canada Revenue Agency fraudulent act that’s been used for years to dupe people out of their money.

It all started two weeks ago when Baker got a terrifying call from Service Canada telling her that her social insurance number had been compromised. The caller identified himself as RCMP investigator Steve Rogers.

You’re not being physically held hostage or held for ransom, but it feels that way. It feels like your freedom is on the line.– Julia-Shea Baker

The caller told her a car rented in her name had been discovered abandoned in south Toronto with blood residue on the seats and 10 kilograms of cocaine inside.

The “officer,” who gave Baker a badge number and a case number, told her that her name and social insurance number were involved in a drug and money-laundering investigation.

“My heart started racing, my palms started sweating,” Baker said. “I was absolutely panicked. I was terrified, absolutely terrified.”

When she questioned the officer’s story, he called her back from a different phone number. The caller ID showed up as belonging to the Cornwall RCMP. She looked for the number on Google and it seemed legitimate.

In September, the RCMP warned Cornwall residents their phone number was being “spoofed” — used fraudulently to make it look as if scammers were calling from the local detachment.

Call lasted hours

“Steve Rogers” told Baker the RCMP would take care of getting her a new SIN, but to protect her money, she had to transfer her savings to secure gift cards.

He instructed her to drive to grocery stores and pharmacies across Cornwall to buy up Google Play gift cards, all the while staying on the line to make sure she did what she was told.

After several purchases, her debit card was declined, so the caller told her to go to her bank and withdraw all the cash she had left to buy more gift cards. When she’d done that, he ordered Baker to call the bank to increase her credit limit, then buy yet more gift cards.

“This went on for four and a half hours,” Baker said. In that time, she spent $4,000 to buy 35 gift cards.

The whole time, the caller stayed on the line, carefully taking note of the gift card numbers and codes.

Threats, intimidation

Baker said she broke down in tears several times during the ordeal, but the man on the phone kept reiterating she couldn’t tell anyone what was going on, and if she did, she could be implicated in the investigation.

He told her that her messages and conversations were being monitored.

“You’re not being physically held hostage or held for ransom, but it feels that way. It feels like your freedom is on the line,” she said.

Julia-Shea Baker describes how she fell victim to a common scam — and why the story the scammers told her seemed to make sense at the time. 4:40

“Steve Rogers” told her he would call her back at 9 a.m. the following day to arrange to give her a new SIN, but he never called. When she called the original number back, the person who answered didn’t speak English.

That’s when she went to her local police station and learned she had been scammed. By then, the money was already gone.

“To realize that you’ve been duped, that somebody has taken advantage of your vulnerability … you feel dirty, you feel violated,” she said.

She said she’d heard of similar scams before, but the “officer” offered her enough information to make her feel the call was legitimate — and urgent.

She’s not alone, according to Jeff Thomson, senior RCMP intelligence analyst with the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre.

He said the SIN scam is the most popular type of identity fraud reported to his unit, and it’s on the rise.

From January to July, there were 800 reports of similar scams in Canada. By October, that number had reached 3,000.

Police say it’s an adaptation of the CRA scam that became prevalent a few years ago. As people got wise to the fraud, the scammers changed tactics.

Some victims give personal details to the callers, allowing them to steal their identities, while others are tricked into sending money, Thomson said.

Caller ID can’t be trusted as a means of filtering out scam calls, he said. The biggest tip-off is if the caller behaves in a threatening manner.

“The government’s never going to call you and threaten you into sending money, they’re not going to ask for your personal information over the phone in an unsolicited fashion, in an alarming, scary fashion,” he said.

His best advice: Just hang up.

Baker said she feels gullible for falling for the scam, and hopes others can learn from her experience.

“If it can help somebody else in the future, then at the end of the day it’s more valuable to me than $4,000,” she said.

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