Free CAIB Exam Prep Tutoring Available with ILScorp Courses

Free CAIB Exam Prep Tutoring Available with ILScorp Courses

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the way many of us carry out our daily activities. Many brokers in Canada are now working remotely from home and many of you are also in the midst of preparing for your CAIB (Canadian Accredited Insurance Broker) examinations.

For those of you who are currently studying for your CAIB exam, or considering the next step in your CAIB designation, a complete set of online training videos is available to you through ILScorp.com.  With ILScorp, you can access these online video CAIB exam prep courses 24 hours a day, anywhere you have an internet connection.

The CAIB exam prep courses are video streamed online and divided into easy-to-manage chapters. Each chapter has internal practice quizzes, as well as at the end of chapter mock exams. A follow-along downloadable workbook, mock midterm, and a mock final exam are also included to help reinforce your knowledge retention.

Adjusting to remote working in addition to preparing for a CAIB exam can be overwhelming, but with these courses, you are not alone in your studies.

The interactive online video CAIB Exam Preparation courses combine the ease and convenience of online learning with the support and dynamic instruction of Todd Hochban.

Todd Hochban, AIIC, CAIB and President of WCT (West Coast Training Ltd.) began his insurance career in the 1970s.  During his 40 plus years in the insurance industry, Todd has been a broker, commercial underwriter and production supervisor.  In 1989 Todd began his training career.  Since then Todd has helped over 7,000 brokers with licensing and technical training.  Known for his enthusiastic and fun approach to learning Todd has developed a loyal following in the Canadian marketplace.

Todd appreciates all the loyal support he has received over the past years and would like to return the gesture now by helping students with their online CAIB studies during the COVID-19 crisis.

Once enrolled in an ILScorp online CAIB exam preparation course, you too will receive free telephone tutoring with instructor Todd Hochban.

Todd can help with checkpoint and discussion questions, provide explanations of any subject in the CAIB program as well as provide study tips and strategies.

Simply call Todd with your questions (604) 828-1810 or (604) 828-1810.

The CAIB programs are available in two formats, online self-study, with 4 months of unlimited course access or online virtual classroom with a 4 week outlined structured approach and 4 months of unlimited course access.

For more information on online CAIB exam preparation, courses click here

Or email ILScorp: info@ilscorp.com

Edited for ILSTV

Trudeau points to bailout for help for renters facing financial crunch

By Jordan Press

THE CANADIAN PRESS

OTTAWA _ Federal officials are looking at ways to get money to community housing providers and the nation’s renters, who may be hit hardest by the economic shock caused by COVID-19, and warning anyone already receiving housing funding to refrain from evictions.

Providers that have federal funding agreements are being told they won’t see cuts to their financial help from Ottawa as deals expire in the coming weeks, said a government source who was not authorized to speak publicly about the measures.

Officials are considering a financial backstop for other providers so they can cover operating costs if tenants can’t pay rent as a result of COVID-19, said a source with knowledge of the discussions, who asked for anonymity to detail private conversations.

Another government source who was not authorized to detail behind-the-scenes talks said there is an ongoing push with at least six provinces to quickly sign up for a new rent supplement to avoid evictions for hundreds of thousands of households who rent.

For most of the efforts underway, the results will take time to unfold. So the Liberals are emphasizing the measures they expect to get approved Tuesday when the government asks the opposition parties to rapidly approve a $27-billion spending package, with a further $55 billion in tax breaks and available credit.

The Senate is scheduled to deal with the legislation on Wednesday.

“We know that there are significant pressures on Canadians right across the country who are facing bills coming in, who are facing pressures on caring for their families,” Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Monday when asked about the situation facing renters.

“That is why we are working extremely quickly to get money out the door and into the pockets of Canadians during this extraordinary time.”

Research from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives said just under half of renters in this country, or 1.6 million households, might have only enough money saved in the bank to pay their bills for a month or less. A further quarter, roughly 830,000 households, don’t have enough income to get through a single week without pay, says an analysis released Monday.

The report argues that the federal spending help, which will hit households in weeks, may come too late for many renters.

COVID-19 has produced a rapid downshift in the economy as businesses are forced to close and Canadians asked to stay home, which has led to a sharp drop in consumer spending and a sharp jump in claims for employment insurance benefits. Last week alone, the government received 500,000 new EI claims.

Many people who file for employment insurance are able to find new jobs before very long, in normal times. But the Conference Board of Canada estimated in a report of its own Monday that the economy could shed more than 330,000 jobs between April and October, which would raise the unemployment rate to 7.7 per cent.

Many of the hardest-hit sectors employ many of the nation’s renters or those who live in subsidized housing.

Jeff Morrison, president of the Canadian Housing and Renewal Association, said federal income-support measures need to get out the door as quickly as possible, while private landlords need to demonstrate some flexibility by allowing rent deferrals.

“For non-profit providers, I’m confident they will not evict, but for them the question becomes how can they pay their bills and keep their lights on,” he said. “In the worst-case scenario, you may see foreclosures and that contributes to homelessness.”

NDP housing critic Jenny Kwan, in a letter to the cabinet committee overseeing the government’s response to COVID-19, asked for a nationwide moratorium on all evictions _ as Ontario has done _ and on rent increases. That would require provinces to issue such orders.

“The situation is incredibly serious and people shouldn’t have to worry about keeping a roof over their heads in the middle of a public health emergency,” she said.

The Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, which administers much of the federal government’s national housing strategy, said in a note to clients on Monday that any organization it funds should suspend evictions until the situation improves.

The government is also asking private landlords to “exercise compassion and refrain from evictions,” said the minister who oversees federal housing efforts.

“CMHC is also working with landlords and housing providers affected by COVID-19 to find appropriate solutions for them,” Social Development Minister Ahmed Hussen said in a statement.

“We expect any housing provider who has received financing or support from CMHC, directly or via provinces and territories, to act compassionately and refrain from eviction.”

Court Criticizes ICBC “Failure” To Pay For Necessary Treatments

ICBC and the Provincial government have been working overtime trying to persuade British Columbians that stripping collision victims of the right to go to court to be fairly paid for their injuries is a good idea.  They claim that by taking away these rights ICBC will treat victims fairly under a so-called ‘care based’ model.

Reasons for judgement were published this week by the BC Supreme Court, Vancouver Registry, demonstrating that ICBC can be anything but fair when it comes to meeting their obligations to pay for long term injury treatments.

In today’s case (Del Bianco v. Yang) the Plaintiff sustained life long injuries in a collision.  At trial he was awarded damages which included payment for future care for massage therapy and kinesiology.  Despite being ordered to pay this money ICBC refused saying they will pay that portion of the judgement from the Plaintiff’s ‘no fault’ insurance with them over the years as the treatments are incurred.  An ICBC adjuster swore an affidavit declaring payments would be made.

The Court did not accept that ICBC would make payments, however, noting that they refused to pay the mandated no-fault benefits in the years prior to trial leaving little confidence that they would fairly meet their future obligations.  In refusing to deduct the vast majority of the awarded future care costs Mr. Justice Groves provided the following criticism of ICBC’s handling of the claim and their unexplained “failure” to pay past benefits they were obliged to:

[13]         It is concerning to the court that the representative of ICBC, Andrew Rudkowski, has not, in his affidavit, explained the failure of ICBC prior to trial to pay the massage therapy costs of the plaintiff. Liability for these motor vehicle accidents was never seriously in dispute. The injuries that required massage therapy, therapy that was necessary for Mr. Del Bianco to work, and effectively minimalize the extent of his tort claim, were lower back, shoulder and soft tissue injuries.

[14]         Equally concerning is the apparent exaggeration, even today, less than one year into a potentially 40-year commitment, as to the extent of ICBC’s commitment to pay what was ordered after trial. In paragraph 6, Andrew Rudkowski deposes that “ICBC will reimburse Mr. Del Bianco for the necessary health care services he has incurred since March 22, 2019 and he incurs in the future”. That is, as noted by defence counsel, not true. They will only reimburse under their payment schedule of $80, when the court determined on the evidence the cost of such treatment at $85.

[15]         Counsel for the plaintiff ably argued about the difficult financial circumstances that his injury and the actions of ICBC placed on the plaintiff from the time of the accident until, essentially, the time of this application. For whatever reason, unexplained, ICBC refused to pay for his massage therapy treatments. The suggestion from counsel for the plaintiff was that ICBC took the position that because he had a hernia operation after the accident, not related to the injuries suffered in the accident, that the hernia problem was the source of his discomfort. That, to a great degree, defies logic, as the hernia was, for lack of a better term, in the plaintiff’s groin or abdomen, whereas the soft tissue injuries requiring massage were in his back.

[16]         The court is faced with the representations of a claims specialist from ICBC that they will, in the future, pay these costs. The evidence about the lack of financial viability of ICBC, as attested to by the Cabinet Minister responsible for ICBC, the Attorney General, is not significantly disputed. Nor is it disputed that ICBC is not prepared to pay for massage therapy at a rate that the court has ordered.

[17]         Additionally, and though this was not raised by counsel, but is a concern to the court, it is hard to know and predict, dare I say impossible to know and predict, at what rate ICBC will, in the future, be paying for massage therapy costs. This is not just a short-term future. This is 40 years. If, as now, this would require the plaintiff to pay the difference himself, to pay over and above what ICBC is prepared to pay, when the tort award was intended to fully compensate him. He may perhaps then seek reimbursement from ICBC. This creates a 40-year responsibility on this plaintiff to keep track of receipts, to make requests and deal with adjusters at ICBC. That is completely inconsistent with the general purpose of litigation and tort awards, to create some finality between the parties.

[18]         In light of the history of non-payment by ICBC for no apparent reason, as experienced by the plaintiff, it is unrealistic, in my view, to require him for a period of 40 years, to have to continue to deal with an adjuster at ICBC in order to obtain what the court has already ordered he is entitled to.

[19]         Additionally, as noted by the plaintiff, there is just too much uncertainty as to the ability of ICBC to make the payments at a rate ordered by the court. They are, today, not prepared to pay at the rate the court ordered. There is too much uncertainty related to their past history of being disinterested or disrespectful of the plaintiff’s claims. There is too much uncertainty as to what the future holds for ICBC, as evidenced by the affidavit of the plaintiff, for the court to have absolute confidence that if money is deducted from the tort award for Part 7 scheduled benefits, that they will actually be paid.

[20]         I note the case of Li v. Newson, 2012 BCSC 675, a decision of Mr. Justice Abrioux, as he then was. He notes in para. 14, inter alia, that “uncertainty as to whether a Part 7 benefit will be paid must be resolved in favour of the plaintiff”. I find on the facts before me considerable uncertainty that payments consistent with the tort award would be paid to Mr. Del Bianco for massage therapy for the 40 years as awarded.

[21]         As such, I am not prepared to deduct amounts for massage therapy under s. 83 from the plaintiff’s tort award. These comments relate to the massage therapy treatments to age 65 and the massage therapy treatments from age 65 to age 75. There is, as noted above, in the circumstances of a 40-year payment period, too much uncertainty and, frankly, too much of a requirement placed on this plaintiff to potentially request reimbursement weekly for funds not paid directly by ICBC, but payable out of his pocket. That is simply too much to expect.

RCMP say COVID-19 no excuse for expired auto insurance, drivers licences

The excerpted article was written by CBC News

ICBC is moving transactions like auto insurance renewals online and over the phone as a way to avoid in-person contact during the spread of COVID-19.

Even though auto insurance services are no longer open at many ICBC offices, driving uninsured won’t fly.

“There is no reason [or] excuse people cannot renew their insurance,” said Cpl. Mike Halskov, with BC RCMP Traffic Services.

“If one fails to renew their insurance when due and continues to drive or is involved in a collision, they are subject to a violation ticket or, in the event of a crash, may not be insured.”

ICBC says to call an Autoplan broker to renew insurance, change a policy or other service. Drivers should give themselves extra time, as transactions may take longer than usual.

After insuring a vehicle, usually the driver is given an update decal to stick on their license with the new expiry date. Those will either be mailed out or can be picked up from an open office, a spokesperson with ICBC said.

Drivers pulled over for having an expired decal will need to show proof of valid insurance regardless of their sticker.

“If a person renews their insurance over the phone and does not receive a new decal right away, police can still determine whether or not a vehicle is insured, even if the decal on the plate is not current,” Halskov said.

Some brokers are still open for transactions that can’t be done over the phone, like vehicle registrations and new policies.

All road tests are suspended for at least the next two weeks but driving licensing offices are still open as usual for license renewals.

On its website, ICBC says customers who show up at an ICBC licencing office will be asked questions to screen for COVID-19, and it’s limited how many people enter the offices so it can ensure social distancing.

Ottawa receives over 500,000 new applications for Employment Insurance

ECONOMICS REPORTER | The Globe and Mail

A half-million Canadian workers filed for Employment Insurance benefits in the past four days alone, as evidence of the deep job losses related to COVID-19 quickly piled up and companies from a wide range of industries announced even more layoffs.

Employment and Social Development Canada said on Friday the department received about 500,000 applications for EI over the past four days, compared with just 27,000 in the same week a year ago.

“Service Canada and many government agencies have received a historic number of calls from concerned Canadians,” Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said at a news conference. “I know people are anxious to get the help they deserve, and our government is working as fast as possible to support them.”

University of Calgary economist Trevor Tombe noted that 500,000 jobs represents 2.6 per cent of total Canadian employment, in line with the percentage of job losses in July, 1932, the worst month for employment during the Great Depression. “It seems clear to me that this is the sharpest negative shock we’ve ever seen,” he said on Twitter.

Economists at major banks slashed their economic forecasts even further. Scotiabank said the economy will contract at an annualized pace of nearly 11 per cent in the second quarter, and a “recession is now unavoidable.” It forecast the economy will shrink by 2.2 per cent this year, although it projected that growth will rebound by the fourth quarter. Bank of Montreal also lowered its second-quarter call to a 10 per cent contraction.

On Friday, companies in industries ranging from aviation to forestry to the arts laid off workers to stay viable amid the economic turmoil caused by COVID-19.

Just under 2,000 flight attendants at leisure airline Air Transat received layoff notices, said Julie Roberts, a union leader at the Canadian Union of Public Employees, which represents the workers.

Employees are not being paid during the layoffs, which start on April 5, and the notice gives no back-to-work date, Ms. Roberts said. The union is trying to obtain some kind of assistance for workers to help soften the impact, but has not had confirmation that will be offered, she said.

“It’s been a crazy, crazy, past two weeks,” said Ms. Roberts, who is also a flight attendant and is losing her job. “I’m really scared about making ends meet.”

The union is concerned about its members who don’t have enough hours to qualify for unemployment assistance, Ms. Roberts said. Some have been on leaves of absence and maternity leave.

Conversations about financial assistance are underway between airline companies and all levels of government, said a source familiar with the situation. The Globe and Mail is not identifying the person because he was not authorized to speak to the media.

Political leaders are receptive, but other sectors are also asking for help, and there is no clarity on the timing or size of any aid package, the person said. National Airlines Council of Canada is involved and airlines are making their own individual cases, the person said.

Air Canada is laying off more than 5,100 flight attendants, including 3,600 from its mainline carrier and 1,549 from Air Canada Rouge. “This has been the most challenging time any of us will likely ever experience as flight attendants,” said Wesley Lesosky, who heads the Air Canada component of CUPE. The layoffs, effective Friday, are expected to last until at least April 30, CUPE said.

Aviation manufacturers are scaling back as demand dries up. Longview Aviation Capital Corp. is suspending new production of Dash 8-400 and Series 400 Twin Otter aircraft at facilities in Ontario, Alberta and British Columbia. Nearly 1,000 employees will be affected, the company said, adding that it hopes to restart manufacturing when conditions improve.

The Big Three automakers announced production suspensions across North America this week, and Canadian auto parts suppliers are grappling with the implications. “It’s never good to see the lights go out,” said Flavio Volpe, president of the Automotive Parts Manufacturers’ Association.

Magna International Inc. is starting to suspend production at facilities around the world, with the exception of China, the company said on Thursday. Linamar Corp. is also assessing operations. “Clearly, the news of customer shutdowns this week globally will have an impact,” chief executive Linda Hasenfratz in a statement. “Each facility is developing plans with their customers and communicating to their employees what this means to them, including potential layoffs.”

The economic devastation of the pandemic is hitting large swaths of the economy, including the arts. The Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity temporarily laid off 400 employees, about 75 per cent of its staff. “This was a difficult choice, but Banff Centre’s viability is our priority,” a statement from the centre said.

West Fraser Timber Co. Ltd. is cutting lumber production in Western Canada and the United States, and suspending plywood production at a facility in B.C. As a result, the company is temporarily laying off employees at six sites, but does not have an exact number yet.

BRP Inc., the Canadian maker of Sea-Doo watercraft and Ski-Doo snowmobiles, suspended its dividend and said it drew down fully a $700-million credit line to prepare for a downturn. The company said it anticipates having to slow production lines or temporarily close facilities as demand slows.

Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce chief economist Avery Shenfeld, who is preparing to cut his own forecasts early next week, said the prospects for the economy to bounce back depend on when the COVID-19 outbreak can be contained. “How the second half [of 2020] shapes up is really about epidemiology, not economics,” he said.

Canadian truckers face insurance issues in U.S.

The excerpted article was written BY  

Trucking companies in Atlantic Canada are raising a red flag over a lack of health insurance for drivers crossing the American border after new restrictions were implemented to deal with the novel coronavirus pandemic.

“Some small companies have called and pointed out that their insurance, or their health insurance, wouldn’t be covered for drivers going into the U.S.,” says Jean-Marc Picard, the executive director of the Atlantic Provinces Trucking Association.

However, in a news release issues late Thursday afternoon, the Canadian Life and Health Insurance Association says “Canada’s life and health insurers are confirming that group out-of-country medical coverage for commercial truckers will continue uninterrupted.”

“Provisions in some group, or workplace insurance plans refer specifically to Government of Canada travel advisories as a limitation or exclusion for out-of-country medical coverage,” spokesperson Kevin Dorse says in the release.

“Some commercial trucking employers offer plans with this exclusion.”

Picard says the issue of immigrant drivers, several of whom are temporary foreign workers crossing the border and being denied re-entry, has been resolved following clarification from the federal government indicating truckers, among others in the trade and transportation sector, are exempt from the isolation rules.

But while trucks are “flowing well across the border,” Picard says it’s not necessarily smooth sailing for the drivers on the ground.

“Some truck stops in the U.S. are starting to close, and Canada as well, limited access, restaurants are closed, take-out only,” which means in some cases there are no places to shower or relax.

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