TD Opens Cybersecurity Office in Israel

 TD Bank Group (TD), today announced, that it will open a cybersecurity office in Tel Aviv, Israel – a first for any Canadian Bank – to tap into one of the world’s leading markets for cybersecurity skills and talent. This is another step forward in TD’s ongoing efforts to deliver meaningful innovations securely to employees and millions of customers across North America. The new office will support TD’s ongoing development of cyber-related technical programs, research and development (R&D) and learning curriculum.

“Customers and employees need to transact with confidence in the digital era,” said Colleen Johnston, Group Head, Direct Channels, Technology, Marketing and Corporate & Public Affairs, TD Bank Group. “In Israel, TD will tap into one of the world’s deepest pools of talent and know-how in cybersecurity, and further strengthen our ability to build new, secure, applications as we build the bank of the future.”

Tel Aviv, among other cities such as Be’er Sheva, Haifa and Jerusalem, has become a global epicentre for cyber-defence technology, processes and systems to both protect and power the next-generation of digital innovation and capability. While global companies – from airlines and manufacturers, to banks and retailers – have set up operations in Israel to leverage the country’s growing cybersecurity ecosystem, TD is the first Canadian bank to open a dedicated office in Tel Aviv for this purpose.

As part of TD’s cybersecurity vision, the bank is making significant investments to recruit technology and cyber talent. With the Israeli office, TD will now have a more direct line into Israel’s cyber and technology talent ecosystem.

“We’re on a journey to build an innovation ecosystem within the bank and we need to attract diverse and highly-skilled talent, among them technical cybersecurity professionals,” said Jeff Henderson, Executive Vice President & CIO, TD Bank Group. “To fuel our innovation, TD is in search of diverse hot skills and perspectives from a wide range of fields, including cyber.”

About TD Bank Group

The Toronto-Dominion Bank and its subsidiaries are collectively known as TD Bank Group (“TD” or the “Bank”). TD is the sixth largest bank in North America by branches and serves more than 25 million customers in three key businesses operating in a number of locations in financial centres around the globe: Canadian Retail, including TD Canada Trust, TD Auto Finance Canada, TD Wealth (Canada), TD Direct Investing, and TD Insurance; U.S. Retail, including TD Bank, America’s Most Convenient Bank®, TD Auto Finance U.S., TD Wealth (U.S.), and an investment in TD Ameritrade; and Wholesale Banking, including TD Securities. TD also ranks among the world’s leading online financial services firms, with approximately 11.5 million active online and mobile customers. TD had CDN$1.2 trillion in assets on July 31, 2017. The Toronto-Dominion Bank trades

SOURCE TD Bank Group

Injuries sustained at mass shootings covered by travel insurance

NICK EAGLAND | Vancouver Sun

Canadian travellers injured in mass-casualty events such as Sunday’s shooting in Las Vegas could face financial devastation without travel insurance.

Six Canadians were among more than 500 people who were injured in the deadly attack Sunday night, including 21-year-old Sheldon Mack of Victoria. Mack was in intensive care Monday after he was shot twice and suffered a ruptured colon and broken forearm.

Also injured were Jan Lambourne of Teulon, Man., Jody Ansell of Stonewall, Man., Steve Arruda of Calgary, Alta., Carrie-Lynn Denis of Leoville, Sask. and Ryan Sarrazin of Camrose, Alta.

Will McAleer, president of the Travel Health Insurance Association of Canada, said a typical travel insurance policy, which can cost a few dollars per day, will “absolutely” cover emergency treatment for significant trauma such as gunshot wounds, which can require intensive surgery, rehabilitation and air evacuation, otherwise costing upwards of US$300,000.

McAleer said travel insurance is also important because it provides assistance services that help people navigate health care systems abroad, where they may need someone advocating for them and acting as a point of contact for family members at home.

He recommends travellers carry copies of their policies with them at all times or use their smartphones to photograph their policy number and insurer’s emergency contact information.

McAleer said it’s vital to plan ahead and protect yourself with insurance when travelling, no matter the destination.

“The sad part, that I think we’re facing, is that this is sort of becoming the new normal,” McAleer said.

“We think, ‘Be careful before you travel to a risky place,’ maybe the Middle East, et cetera. But now, whether it’s Orlando, London, New York City — whether it’s Edmonton — these things are happening with increased frequency.”

Global Affairs Canada advised anyone in Las Vegas who needs emergency consular assistance to call the Consulate General of Canada in Los Angeles at 1-844-880-6519 or the Emergency Watch and Response Centre in Ottawa directly at 1-613-996-8885.

— Nick Eagland with files from Canadian Press

$220,000 Non-Pecuniary Assessment for Leg Amputation and Chronic Pain

Today’s guest post comes from B.C. injury claims lawyer Erik Magraken

Reasons for judgement were released today by the BC Supreme Court, Vancouver Registry, assessing damages for a leg amputation caused by a vehicle collision.

In today’s case (Bye v. Nelson) the plaintiff was operating a dirt bike which was involved in a collision with an ATV operated by the Defendant.  The collisions caused severe injuries including a left leg amputation.

In assessing non-pecuniary damages at $220,000 Madam Justice Choi provided the following reasons:

[3]             …Not in dispute is that Mr. Bye’s dirt bike and Mr. Newman’s ATV collided near a curve in the road. Both vehicles were damaged, and Mr. Bye was left with a number of injuries including a fracture to his neck and multiple fractures to his legs. Although Mr. Bye was rushed to the hospital, his injuries required a through-knee amputation of much of his left leg.

[93]         Mr. Bye is a young man. He was 35 years old at trial and 31 at the time of the accident. He was an active man who enjoyed various recreational pursuits. He had been employed by Teck Metals as a carpenter commencing February 2010. It was a job he loved, which paid him handsomely.

[94]         The injuries from the accident have changed his life dramatically forever. He now suffers from daily pain and fatigue as a result of the amputation and is permanently disabled from returning to carpentry work and to many of his recreational activities. He testified that, before the accident, he enjoyed dirt biking, boating, hunting, fishing, hiking, and swimming, and that his injuries have either cut off, or severely limited his enjoyment of these.

[95]         Additionally, Mr. Bye is now a father, with his son born during the litigation, in 2016. While he is still able to play with and care for his son, many of these interactions are made more difficult by his injury. He testified to the difficulties of lowering himself to the floor to spend time with his son…

[102]      Mr. Bye has been dealing with his injuries since he was 31. He will continue to face difficulties for the rest of his life. Considering all the evidence, the Stapley factors, and case law submitted by the parties, I conclude an award of $220,000 is fair and appropriate in all the circumstances.

RSA Canada appoints first SVP and Chief Underwriting Officer

Press Release:

RSA Canada announces the appointment of Steve Cohen as Chief Underwriting Officer.

RSA is pleased to announce the appointment of Steve Cohen to the newly created role of Senior Vice President and Chief Underwriting Officer.

The SVP and Chief Underwriting Officer role was created to build upon the progress RSA has made in advancing core underwriting and pricing capabilities over the last few years.  Steve will be joining RSA during the first quarter of 2018 and will be responsible for head office underwriting, pricing and reinsurance across both Personal and Commercial Insurance portfolios.  Reporting directly to RSA’s President & CEO Martin Thompson, Steve will also be responsible for enhancing RSA’s capabilities in data, analytics and growth.

“We are thrilled to welcome Steve to RSA. Steve’s extensive experience in the insurance industry will help us further embed best in class capabilities in underwriting and pricing.” says RSA President & CEO Martin Thompson.

For more information about RSA Canada visit www.rsagroup.ca or check us out on Twitter at @RSACanada.

About RSA
With a 300 year heritage, RSA is one of the world’s leading multinational quoted insurance groups. Focusing on general insurance, RSA’s core markets are the UK and Ireland, Scandinavia and Canada with the capability to write business across the globe. We have around 13,500 employees across the core business and, in 2015, our net written premiums were £6.8 billion.

About RSA Canada
RSA Canada includes Royal & Sun Alliance Insurance Company of Canada (www.rsagroup.ca), The Johnson Corporation and its affiliates (www.johnson.ca), RSA Travel Insurance Inc. (www.rsatravelinsurance.ca) which operates as RSA Travel Insurance Agency in British Columbia, Canadian Northern Shield Insurance Company (www.cns.ca), Western Assurance Company (www.westernassurance.ca), Ascentus Insurance Ltd., and Quebec Assurance Company.

©2017 Royal & Sun Alliance Insurance Company of Canada. All rights reserved. RSA, RSA & Design and related words and logos are trademarks and the property of RSA Insurance Group plc, licensed for use by Royal & Sun Alliance Insurance Company of Canada. RSA is a trade name of Royal & Sun Alliance Insurance Company of Canada.

SOURCE RSA Canada

Last winter’s extreme conditions contributed to a 10% increase in motor-vehicle casualty crashes in B.C.

RICHMOND, BCOct. 2, 2017 /CNW/ – Last winter’s extreme conditions contributed to a 10 percent increase in motor-vehicle casualty crashes in B.C. between October and December, where driving too fast for the conditions was a contributing factor. This is a 10 per cent increase from 2015, when 570 casualty crashes occurred, as compared to 626 in 20161 (police-attended crashes, 2012–2016).

While last year’s weather was unusual for some parts of the province, on average, each year in British Columbia the number of casualty crashes due to driving too fast for conditions doubles in December compared to October. Between 2012 and 2016, an average of more than 260 casualty crashes occurred in December compared to approximately 130 in October (police-attended crashes, 2012-2016).

For those who drive for work, October, November and December are the most dangerous months. Almost 30 per cent of all work-related crashes resulting in injury and time-loss claims occur during these three months.

In December 2016 alone, WorkSafeBC claims from crashes that resulted in injuries and lost time from work were 38 per cent higher than in December 2015.

Depending on where you drive in the province, winter road conditions vary, from snow and ice in the north and on high mountain passes, to rain and fog commonly found in the Lower Mainland and southern Vancouver Island. Drivers need to prepare for the possibility of changing road and weather conditions, and adapt.

Between October 1 and March 31, most B.C. highways require passenger vehicles to have winter tires (three-peaked mountain and snowflake, or mud and snow) and commercial vehicles to carry chains. The Winter Driving Safety Alliance advises all drivers to prepare now to stay safe on the roads this winter:

  • Don’t go — If conditions are bad, postpone your trip if possible.
  • Plan your trip — If you have to travel, check road and weather conditions and select the safest route. Give yourself extra time to get to your destination to avoid rushing, and have an emergency plan if you get stuck.
  • Prepare your vehicle — Install a set of four matched winter tires and keep an emergency kit in your vehicle. Every year, be sure to give your vehicle a pre-season maintenance check-up.
  • Slow down and drive to the conditions — Even the most confident and seasoned drivers are at risk in hazardous road conditions. Slow down to match road conditions and maintain a safe following distance, at least four seconds,between you and the vehicle ahead.
  • For employers and supervisors — The Winter Driving Safety online course and Toolkit on the Shift Into Winterwebsite provides useful information for planning, implementing and monitoring a winter-driving safety program.

For more information about what you can do to stay safe while driving this winter, visit ShiftIntoWinter.ca.

Quotes:

Hon. Harry Bains, Minister of Labour –
“I encourage all drivers to keep themselves, and others who use the road, safe in the wintry months ahead. Anything a driver can do to prevent an accident from occurring, whether it’s by slowing down, abiding by road signs, or being a little more present while driving, will help to keep more people safe.”

Hon. Claire Trevena, Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure –
“We want to remind everyone to ensure their vehicle is prepped and ready for winter weather in advance. This means having proper winter tires (Mountain Snowflake or M+S tires) for certain routes, checking DriveBC before you head out, and giving yourself extra time to travel in bad weather conditions.”

Al Johnson, Vice President, Prevention Services, WorkSafeBC 
“Each and every worker in the province deserves to go home safely at the end of the day, whether they work in a fixed workplace or their office is on the road. Many BC workers who drive for work are at greater risk of injury during the winter months because driving conditions are more extreme. The Shift into Winter campaign reminds us why being prepared before road conditions deteriorate is so important – to prevent serious work-related injuries and deaths. Being prepared can save lives.”

About the Winter Driving Safety Alliance

This multi-agency working group shares a common goal of reducing the frequency and severity of winter-related motor vehicle crashes. Ambulance Paramedics of B.C. CUPE 873, BCAA, B.C. Road Builders and Heavy Construction Association, Mainroad Group, B.C. Forest Safety Council, B.C. Trucking Association, Finning, Government of B.C., Insurance Corporation of B.C., Justice Institute of British Columbia, Kal Tire, Pacific Coach Lines, RCMP, WorkSafeBC, Automotive Retailers Association, Trucking Safety Council of B.C., City of Prince George, and Tire and Rubber Association of Canada.

SOURCE Road Safety At Work

Winter Tire Season Begins

Snow Zone Winter Tire SignIs summer over already? It seems that the lawn is just coming out of dormancy in my yard but night time temperatures have dipped below 7 degrees. That and the fact that it is October the first means that it’s time to get winter tires installed. Winter tire and chain up routes are now in effect.

I’m fortunate enough to be able to afford a set of four winter tires, wheels and tire pressure sensors for both of our vehicles. I feel strongly enough about the effectiveness of using true winter tires instead of all season tires that I consider the cost money well spent.I have a set of chains for my two wheel drive pickup truck in addition to the four winter tires. I’ve been stuck with it before trying to drive on the greasy wet snow that quickly packs and polishes to ice here on the Island and that’s not going to happen again!

Studded winter tires are also a good choice, especially on black ice, but remember that if you have a front wheel drive vehicle you must purchase a set of four studded winter tires.

Having said that, I’ve also spent a few winters here with only all season tires on the vehicle and even with four wheel drive did occasionally have trouble. The all season tires did meet the definition of winter tires for the purposes of the signs posted on our highways by the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure each year.

However, they are a trade off, both in terms of cost and performance. No one tire can handle all road conditions equally well, and this is true of winter tires being used in the summer.

The M+S marking on an all season tire tells us about the tread design. It has no connection with the rubber compound used to make the tread and it’s ability to stick to snow and ice.

Speaking of tread, winter tires are considered to be worn out when their minimum tread depth is twice that of summer or all season tires. Even then, the minimum tread depth may not be enough to keep you safe.

Most people think of winter tires in terms of traction to move the vehicle ahead. This is only part of the equation as true winter tires also help you turn and brake. Michelin has produced a video titled Winter Driving Tips on Braking that illustrates steering control difficulties created by mis-matched tires and how winter tires work with current vehicle safety systems.

You’ve probably heard it many times before, but adequate tires are not the only thing that you should consider having for winter driving. Being prepared for trouble with a shovel, tow rope, washer fluid, extra winter clothing, tools and a collection of small spare parts is never a bad idea.

You can’t always blame the road maintenance. There are some situations that even the best winter tires and chains cannot conquer. Know before you gois always good advice because sometimes the best choice is not to travel at all. Few of us must make trips in bad weather conditions that are more important than our health and well being.

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