Hamilton-Niagara RCMP Make Arrest in Synthetic Identity Fraud

The Hamilton-Niagara Regional Detachment of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) – Financial Crime Section have arrested and charged 48 year old Naeem AKHTAR from Markham, Ontario with Fraud and Money Laundering. The value of the fraud is presently estimated at this time to exceed $3 million dollars.

The scheme involved over one hundred false identities used to obtain credit cards and other loans from Canadian financial institutions. Known as a make-up, pump-up, run-up scheme, the suspect created an elaborate network of false identities and shell companies. The fake identities used included false Ontario driver’s licenses or actual Province of Ontario driver’s licenses created using fake foreign passports, fake Social Insurance Cards or false Canadian Permanent Resident cards.  This differed from traditional identity theft in that the personas created did not exist at all, which poses a threat to the Government of Canada’s systems and programs as well the integrity of Canada’s financial institutions.

Credit was created using the fake identities with falsified employment records and paystubs from the shell companies controlled by AKHTAR. The credit was increased by patiently accepting credit increases over the years. The shell companies were used to launder the proceeds of the crime by creating false invoicing for the fraudulent credit cards.

The scheme was further complicated by the use of postal mail forwarding services.  Through this AKHTAR was able to provide dozens of seemingly unrelated and innocuous addresses on credit applications but the mail would actually be redirected to rental mailboxes controlled by him.    AKHTAR is scheduled to appear in court on August 15th, 2017 in Newmarket, Ontario.

This investigation was assisted by proactive work from the anti-money laundering and corporate security units at Canadian Tire Bank, Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce, The Bank of Montreal, TD Bank, Royal Bank, Scotiabank, and the Ontario Ministry of Transportation. The RCMP would also like to thank the Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada (FINTRAC) for its collaboration in this investigation.

“The creation and use of synthetic identities by criminals to enrich themselves is a threat to all Canadians and poses a significant risk to Canadian government programs and financial institutions. This investigation is an example of the effective partnership between the RCMP, FINTRAC and Canadian Financial Institutions. The RCMP is committed to working together with our partners to combat this type of fraudulent activity by criminals who only seek to enrich themselves at the expense of Canadians” said Inspector Todd Gilmore, Southwest District Commander.

The investigation is ongoing.

Website: RCMP in Ontario
Twitter: @RCMPONT
Facebook: RCMP.Ontario
YouTube: RCMPGRCPOLICE

SOURCE Royal Canadian Mounted Police

9 Summer Foods That Are Healthier Than You Think

9 Summer Foods That Are Healthier Than You Think

Excerpreted article was written BY LAUREN GELMAN, RD.COM

Watermelon

This juicy and refreshing fruit will not only quench your thirst, but will also deliver a dose of vitamins A, C, potassium, and the cancer-fighting antioxidant lycopene, according to WebMD. It’s also one of the richest natural sources of the amino acid L-citrulline, which helps regulate arterial function and may lower blood pressure, as discovered by researchers in a 2010 Florida State University study. 

Shrimp

Yes, shrimp contains cholesterol, but many researchers think that the cholesterol you consume from food plays a negligible effect on cholesterol in your bloodstream (that number tends to spike in response to a higher intake of certain saturated and trans fats). Shrimp is also high in protein, low in fat, and a good source of heart-protective omega-3s and vitamin B12, according to Outsidemagazine.

Iceberg Lettuce

Darker greens may have more nutrients, says Prevention magazine, but that doesn’t mean iceberg has none. If an iceberg wedge is your favourite salad, note that one cup of shredded leaves delivers about 20 per cent of your daily needs for vitamin K, and 15 per cent for vitamin A. Even if you use iceberg as a salad base for other healthy veggies, you’ve got a great vehicle for overall nutrition.

Popcorn

Real, popped-at-home corn is a terrifically healthy snack. It may even have more antioxidants than certain fruits and vegetables, researchers at the University of Scranton in Pennsylvania found last year. Air-popped and without butter, it’s low in fat and high in fibre, says Today nutrition expert Joy Bauer, RD: “five grams of fibre in a four-cup portion is pretty darn impressive for a snack food.”

Celery

Celery boasts a surprising array of good-for-you nutrients, including anti-inflammatory compounds that soothe your digestive tract, disease-fighting antioxidants, and vitamins such as folate, vitamin K, and vitamin C. Crunch on that next time you swirl it around your Bloody Mary or use as a vessel for French onion dip.

Sunflower Seeds

Nuts are a healthy snack favourite among nutritionists and other health experts, but don’t forget about sunflower seeds. They are high in vitamin E, magnesium, and thiamin, which helps yourbrain function.

Sauerkraut

Go ahead, pile it on. Fermented foods like sauerkraut are a unique source of probiotics, which help maintain a healthy balance of bacteria in your belly. “These healthy microbes help with digestion and nutrient absorption,” writes Darya Pino Rose, PhD, in her new book Foodist. “Without them our gut health deteriorates substantially, setting the stage for many chronic diseases.”

Mushrooms

Cooking Light notes that mushrooms are the only vegetable source of vitamin D; and “many compounds have been identified in mushrooms that show potential for boosting immunity and possibly protecting against cancer,” says Pino Rose in Foodist.

Source: Readers Digest

RSA Canada employees from coast to coast come together to help clean up Canada’s shoreline for wildlife

More than 185 employees from RSA Canada took part in the company’s first-ever Great Canadian Shoreline Cleanup campaign earlier this week.

A conservation initiative of the Vancouver Aquarium and WWF-Canada, the Great Canadian Shoreline Cleanup provides Canadians with the opportunity to rehabilitate shorelines and create healthier water ecosystems for people and wildlife, one piece of trash at a time.

RSA’s Great Canadian Shoreline Cleanup events took place in nine cities across the country. Employees across RSA and Johnson offices worked together in teams to pick up garbage from various locations where water met land.

The teams worked together to clean up shores in the following locations:

  • Vancouver – Burrard Inlet at Portside Park
  • EdmontonEmily Murphy Park
  • Calgary – Elbow River at Stampede Park
  • GTAMarilyn Bell Park
  • Québec CityParc de la rivière du Berger
  • Sherbrooke – Magog River at Boisé de la Sauvagine
  • Montréal – Canal Lachine – Pont Lafleur
  • St. John’s – Quidi Lake
  • Halifax – Frenchman Lake

“Participating in the cleanup with colleagues was an enjoyable team-building exercise,” said Molly MacInnis in RSA Canada’s Toronto office. “Encouraging us to participate in initiatives that are important to us on a personal level is a testament to RSA’s belief in the benefits of integrating employee engagement and corporate responsibility initiatives.”

At the end of each day, each region also weighed and tallied how much trash had been cleaned up, participated in an important discussion about the items they found, and reflected on what they learned from the experience. Among the most interesting and unusual items picked up was an onion, a jar of pickles and a shopping cart. In total, pounds of litter was picked up before it had the chance to get into the water where it can harm fish, whales, turtles, shorebirds and other aquatic wildlife.

“RSA Canada is proud to participate in this initiative in partnership with WWF-Canada and the Vancouver Aquarium. We know how important it is to keep our shorelines, parks and lakes clean in order to preserve Canada’s wildlife,” says RSA President and CEO, Martin Thompson. “The five-year partnership with WWF-Canada is helping us inspire and engage employees in workplaces across Canada to take environmental action, through activities like the Great Canadian Shoreline Cleanup.”

Every year, tens of thousands of Canadians take action against shoreline litter by participating in the Great Canadian Shoreline Cleanup one of the largest direct action conservation programs in Canada. Now in its 24th year, the Great Canadian Shoreline Cleanup has collected more than 1.2 million kilograms of trash across Canada with the help of over 700,000 volunteers.

To participate in a Shoreline Cleanup near you or to learn more about this important initiative, please visit www.shorelinecleanup.ca.

For more information about RSA Canada, visit www.rsagroup.ca or check us out on Twitter at @RSACanada.

About RSA
With a 300 year heritage, RSA is a multinational quoted insurance group. Focusing on general insurance, RSA’s core markets are the UK & Ireland, Scandinavia and Canada, with the capability to write insurance business across the globe.  RSA’s core businesses have approximately 13,500 employees with net written premiums of £6.3bn in 2016.

About RSA Canada
The RSA Canada group of companies includes Roins Financial Services Limited, Royal & Sun Alliance Insurance Company of Canada, Quebec Assurance Company, Johnson Inc., Unifund Assurance Company, Western Assurance Company, Ascentus Insurance Ltd., Canadian Northern Shield Insurance Company and RSA Travel Insurance Inc. (collectively, “RSA Canada”) and is part of a group of companies headed by RSA Insurance Group Plc. RSA Canada employs more than 3,000 people across Canada and is one of the oldest insurance companies in the country with roots dating back to 1833.

©2017 Royal & Sun Alliance Insurance Company of Canada. All rights reserved. RSA, RSA & Design and related words and logos are trademarks and the property of RSA Insurance Group plc, licensed for use by Royal & Sun Alliance Insurance Company of Canada. RSA is a trade name of Royal & Sun Alliance Insurance Company of Canada.

About WWF-Canada & RSA Canada’s partnership
In March 2016, WWF-Canada and RSA Canada kicked off a new five-year partnership to inspire and engage employees in workplaces across Canada to take environmental action. With this partnership, RSA became the new presenting sponsor of Living Planet @ Work, WWF-Canada’s environmental employee engagement program. In doing so, RSA demonstrates and promotes the benefits of integrating employee engagement and corporate responsibility initiatives.

Through this partnership, WWF-Canada is supporting RSA to develop a robust national green team program in order to engage employees coast to coast to take action on sustainability.

This partnership supports RSA Canada’s corporate responsibility commitments to reduce the carbon emissions from our internal operations by 12 per cent per employee by 2018 (2015 baseline) as well as support our customers with tools and solutions to better respond to changing environmental risks and opportunities.

About World Wildlife Fund Canada
WWF-Canada creates solutions to the environmental challenges that matter most for Canadians. We work in places that are unique and ecologically important, so that nature, wildlife and people thrive together. Because we are all wildlife. For more information, visit wwf.ca.

About the Great Canadian Shoreline Cleanup
The Great Canadian Shoreline Cleanup, presented by Loblaw Companies Limited, is one of the largest direct action conservation programs in Canada. A conservation initiative of the Vancouver Aquarium and WWF, the Shoreline Cleanup aims to promote understanding of shoreline litter issues by engaging Canadians to rehabilitate shoreline areas through cleanups. www.ShorelineCleanup.ca

Vancouver Aquarium Marine Science Centre
The Vancouver Aquarium Marine Science Centre is a non‐profit society dedicated to the conservation of aquatic life. www.vanaqua.org

SOURCE RSA Canada

“It Is Not Necessary To Call Expert Evidence On Each Issue”

In recent years expert evidence has become more common in injury litigation and it is not unusual to see litigants sometimes err on the side of overkill.  To this end helpful comments were recently released by the BC Supreme Court, Kelowna Registry, highlighting this practice and reminding litigants expert evidence can be used judiciously.

In the recent case (Truax v. Hyrb) the parties were involved in a collision and fault was at issue.  The Defendant brought an application seeking a dismissal of the lawsuit and argued that the Plaintiff failing to adduce expert engineering evidence should lead to an adverse inference.  In rejecting this suggestion Mr. Justice Dley provided the following comments about the over-use of expert evidence:

[20]         The defence argues that the failure by the plaintiff to introduce engineering evidence of the collision is “telling” and that an inference should be drawn against Mr. Truax. I agree that the absence of engineering evidence is telling – there is no need to call such expert evidence when common sense prevails.

[21]         Litigation has become a costly venture; oftentimes unnecessarily so. Litigants are far too quick to secure expert testimony when it is not required. Perhaps that is out of an abundance of caution and concern that the absence of expert evidence will be a failing of counsel.

[22]         Each case should be considered on its unique circumstances. It is trite to say that it is not necessary to call expert evidence on each issue. Expert testimony should be restricted to those matters where it would actually assist the court because the evidence is so specialized, scientific or complex. Expert evidence should not be viewed as a default or automatic step in litigation strategy.

 

$75,000 Non-Pecuniary Assessment for Aggravation of Chronic, Disabling Pre-Existing Condition

Reasons for judgement were published today by the BC Supreme Court, Vancouver Registry, assessing damages for a collision which aggravated long-standing pre-existing health complications.

In today’s case (Cheema v. Khan) the Plaintiff was disabled since 2003 due to arthritis and depression.  She was involved in a 2012 collision that the Defendants admitted fault for.  The collision aggravated her pre-existing issues.  In assessing non-pecuniary damages at $75,000 Chief Justice Hinkson provided the following reasons:

[103]     There is no question that Ms. Cheema was unemployable after 2003. She had been on long-term disability from employment as a linen worker since 2004 due to rheumatoid arthritis and major depressive disorder. She was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis in the 1990s. The pain was in her neck initially, followed by bilateral hand pain since 2000. Her rheumatoid arthritis affected her hands, wrists, feet, ankles and shoulders. In the month preceding the Collision, the plaintiff had a flare up of her rheumatoid arthritis. Since 2000, the plaintiff had also suffered from longstanding, severe and chronic major depressive disorder, chronic anxiety and panic attacks leading up to the Collision.

[104]     I am unable to accept the plaintiff’s submission that her condition prior to the Collision was stable. She suffered from severe rheumatoid arthritis, Morton’s neuromas and a severe major depressive disorder prior to the Collision, and these conditions compromised her ability to ambulate, cook, clean and perform other household activities. I am satisfied that the plaintiff’s severe rheumatoid arthritis and severe depression waxed and waned prior to the Collision, but overall were worsening, and would have continued to worsen even if she had not been involved in the Collision.

[105]     I find, however, that the Collision caused an aggravation of her pre-Collision neck, back and shoulder pain and headaches, and likely had a negative effect on the symptoms arising from her rheumatoid arthritis.

[106]     I conclude that the plaintiff’s neck, back and shoulder pain and headaches were worsened by the Collision and that without the accident she would not have suffered from those difficulties as much as she has for the four years that have followed the Collision.

[107]     I accept the evidence of Dr. Shuckett that stress has a negative effect on someone suffering from rheumatoid arthritis, and has had such an effect on the plaintiff and accelerated the progress of her disease.

[108]     I am also persuaded that the Collision had a negative effect on the plaintiff’s psychiatric state that has resulted in a downward spiralling effect causing the plaintiff to brood about her physical condition and limit her activities, in turn worsening her depression, in turn compromising her participation in certain activities and so on…

[133]     I assess the plaintiff’s non-pecuniary damages at $75,000.

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