V² Streamlines Underwriting Process for Small to Midsize Accounts

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Canada Protection Plan Launches Express Elite Life Insurance Plan to Simplify Application Process

TORONTO — Canada Protection Plan, a leading provider of No Medical and Simplified life insurance, today announced the launch of Express Elite Term, a no-medical life insurance product. In 15 minutes or less, Canadians and newcomers with a work permit who are in excellent health and between the ages of 18-60 years can apply either by phone or online. Within a few days, they can receive coverage for up to $500,000 with no medical exams required.

“Our clients deserve to be rewarded for maintaining a well-balanced lifestyle,” said Michael Aziz, Chief Distribution Officer, Canada Protection Plan. “We developed Express Elite because we recognize that while life insurance is an important part of financial planning, time is in short supply for many Canadians. As consumer tastes change, we’re developing innovative insurance solutions that fit with the desire for a simple, fast, and convenient experience.”

Payments begin in the second month on a monthly payment system. In addition to offering $100,000 to $500,000 in coverage, Express Elite offers 20-year and 30-year terms as well as complimentary benefits including emergency financial assistance programs and scholarships. The policy is also renewable up to age 80 and convertible to age 70.

Express Elite is available through more than 23,000 licensed advisors across the country, or with Canada Protection Plan (www.cpp.ca) at 1-877-447-6060.

About Canada Protection Plan
Canada Protection Plan, one of Canada’s leading providers of No Medical and Simplified Issue life insurance, is a Canadian owned and operated corporation that designs, markets and sells life insurance and related products with simplified underwriting processes that require no medical exams on many of their plans. The company is dedicated to providing life insurance protection against unexpected events at a competitive price by offering numerous product choices and purchase options, making insurance coverage easily obtainable.

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20190529005072/en/

District research finds cost of basic insurance more in B.C. than in other provinces

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Highrise condo buyer denied insurance due to flood emergency

Aviva Canada turned down Inna Nei, citing state of emergency declared in April

Laurie Fagan · CBC News 

When Pat St. George and Inna Nei separated recently, they decided to sell the family home and move into their own condos in different areas of Ottawa.

St. George was able to transfer their home protection policy to his new residence, but when Nei tried to take out a policy for her new place on Richmond Road, the company they’d been dealing with for about six years, Aviva Canada, said no.

I can understand why they wouldn’t want to sign policies on flood-affected properties, but to paint the whole city or whole region as non-insurable is ludicrous.- Pat St. George, Aviva Canada customer
According to St. George, the company cited Ottawa’s state of emergency, declared on April 25 as floodwaters threatened parts of the city.

St. George said that makes no sense, especially since Nei’s condo is in a highrise and didn’t flood.

“I can understand why they wouldn’t want to sign policies on flood-affected properties, but to paint the whole city or whole region as non-insurable is ludicrous,” St. George said.

Common practice

In a written statement to CBC, the company explained: “Like most insurers, Aviva Canada does not sell new home or automobile policies located in an area that is under a flood alert or flood evacuation order.”

Aviva said once the state of emergency ends, it will resume offering policies to homebuyers in Ottawa.

Aviva also cancelled St. George’s added water protection for his condo, which covers sewer backup and overland flooding, until the emergency is lifted.

“I find it peculiar because we can’t be the only ones in Ottawa who are buying property, and the state of emergency has been in effect since April,” St. George said. “I can only imagine how many people are being affected by this.”

According to the Ottawa Real Estate Board, 2,032 residential properties were sold in Ottawa in April. Each one of those buyers would need home insurance to acquire a mortgage.

‘Conflicting interests’

Pete Karageorgos, director of consumer and industry relations with the Insurance Bureau of Canada, said insurance companies are forced to make tough decisions during emergencies such as the this spring’s flooding or the destructive wildfire in Fort McMurray, Alta, in May 2016.

“Insurance companies are not in the position to expand during states of emergencies and take on more risk,”  Karageorgos said.

“Regardless if you are right by the water’s edge or you are well inland or in a highrise, the insurance companies, not all, but many, are saying, ‘We’re holding off taking on more risk until the situation is normalized.'”

Pat St. George was shocked when insurance companies told him Ottawa’s state of emergency was the reason why they weren’t willing to insure his wife’s new condo. 7:37
Insurance companies must consider their current policy holders, Karageorgos said.

“It does seem unfair [but] you’ve got conflicting interests, and that’s where the challenge is taking on new policies.”

Karageorgos said there are some insurance companies that will offer policies during states of emergency.

Nei said she called six companies seeking a policy for her condo. Four said no, and only two said yes.

“You are kind of at the whim of getting any [company] you can find to give you a policy,” St. George said. “Who’s to say [Nei is] getting a fair rate?”

Don’t delay, there are only days left to the May 31 CE credit deadline

Don’t delay, there are only days left to the May 31 CE credit deadline

Don’t leave the entry of your completed Manitoba Continuing Education credits until the last minute.

Enter credits upon completion and allow the Insurance Council of Manitoba’s online CE system to to
a)track how many CE credits you have completed,
b) remind/inform you of how many more credits are required to renew your license and
c) simplify your online renewal.

Register as a new applicant of Login with your existing ICM account with your User Id and Password and click on “Continuing Education” to view your CE Status and log the CE courses that you have successfully completed. Simplified instructions to enter your CE credits are outlined under “Report Courses”.

Continuing education credits must have been obtained from an accredited course provider, such as ILScorp or have received individual course approval by the ICM.

Manitoba General/Adjuster Accredited Courses

If you intend to apply a course or seminar that is not offered by an Accredited Course Provider, completion and submission of the Individual CE Approval Application are required. The application form must be submitted to the ICM at least 30 days in advance of the course to ensure sufficient time to make an informed determination as to whether the CE course qualifies for Manitoba CE credits. More information on what type of CE would fall into this category can be found on the ICM website under “Continuing Education Info”

Manitoba Life/A&S Accredited Courses

Entry of CE for the same course more than once may be permitted on an exception basis only. If an agent wishes to claim credit for a course more than once, the agent must contact the Insurance Council of Manitoba for prior approval and provide written reasons. This review is subject to the individual course review fee of $50.

For your reference, the Manitoba Continuing Education Credit requirements including the applicable definition for each class of license can be located on the ICM website, and are briefly outlined below:

Manitoba Continuing Education Credit Hour Requirements

Life and/or Accident & Sickness

General

Auto-Only Brokers

Adjusters

CE Information specific to Non-Residents of Manitoba

Non-residents residing in Canadian jurisdictions that have continuing education requirements will be deemed to have met the requirement in Manitoba. Agents/Brokers residing in a jurisdiction where continuing education is not mandatory are required to comply with Manitoba’s continuing education requirements.

Residents of the United States of America are required to comply with Manitoba continuing education requirements.

NOTE: Continuing Education Credits must be obtained from an Accredited Course Provider or a course that has been individually approved by the Insurance Council of Manitoba.

Edited for ILSTV

ICBC Privacy Breach Class Action Allowed To Include Claim for Punitive Damages

Source: Erik Magraken BC Injury and ICBC Claims Blog

In the recent case (Ari v. ICBC) ICBC was sued after an employee of theirs passed personal records ICBC kept to “an acquaintance involved in the drug trade” after which a series of attacks were carried out against some of the individuals who had their private information compromised.  The court noted the following background

[2]             A former employee of ICBC, Ms. Candy Elaine Rheaume, for no business purpose, accessed personal information of 78 ICBC customers (“Primary Plaintiffs”) who had been at or near the Justice Institute of British Columbia in New Westminster. The personal information included names, addresses, driver’s license numbers, vehicle descriptions and identification numbers, license plate numbers, and claims histories. Ms. Rheaume then provided the information to an acquaintance involved in the drug trade. She received $25.00 per name provided. She was charged with, and pleaded guilty to, fraudulently obtaining a computer service pursuant to s. 342.1 of the Criminal Code and received a suspended sentence with nine months probation.

[3]             The illegally obtained information was used to target 13 of the Primary Plaintiffs (“Attack Victims”) with vandalism, arson and shootings between April 2011 and January 2012 (“Attacks”). Two people have been found criminally responsible for their involvement in the Attacks. The attackers thought they were targeting police officers solely because the vehicles were parked at or near the Justice Institute.

The Plaintiff succeeded in certifying a class action lawsuit against ICBC on the basis that they should be vicariously liable for the employee’s wrongdoing.  The chambers judge hearing the certification application declined and include all class members the plaintiff sought to have included and also removed the claim for punitive damages.  In finding that punitive damages claims should form part of the proceeding the BC Court of Appeal provided the following reasons:

[29]         Punitive damages may be awarded when misconduct “represents a marked departure from ordinary standards of decent behaviour”: Whiten v. Pilot Insurance Co., 2002 SCC 18 at para. 36. Punitive damages may be certified as a common issue in appropriate cases. Rumley v. British Columbia, 2001 SCC 69 at para. 34.

[30]         Rather than consider the past history of breaches of privacy by ICBC employees—the evidence supported that at least 7 employees have been terminated by ICBC between 2008 and 2011 for privacy breaches—the chambers judge considered the steps taken since the breach in this case was discovered. While laudable on ICBC’s part, subsequent conduct is not the sole basis upon which punitive damages are determined. The chambers judge should have accepted as true the allegation that ICBC has a history of employees breaching private information. Instead, she judged the case on the merits on the evidence before her. That was an incorrect approach.

[31]         In my view, the chambers judge erred when she refused to certify punitive damages. There was a basis in fact for the claim based on the information relating to the history of privacy breaches by employees.

[32]         Before us, ICBC asked that if we overturn the failure to certify the issues, we return the case to the chambers judge for the analysis on preferability. This was the approach this Court took in Kirk v. Executive Flight Centre Fuel Services Ltd., 2019 BCCA 111 at para. 151.

[33]         With respect to the punitive damages issue, the chambers judge continued the analysis and concluded that had she not decided that there was no basis in fact for a claim for punitive damages, it would be an appropriate case for certification.

[34]         The chambers judge carefully analyzed the preferability of the issues she did certify. In respect of the Other Residents, her analysis is equally applicable. The common issues that were certified apply equally to the Other Residents. Some of the Other Residents will fall into the subclass.

[35]         A judge has a great deal of discretion to change things to fit the circumstances as a class proceeding progresses. At this point, there having been no discovery, it is my view that the additional classes and common issues are preferable for a class proceeding. I would not refer that issue back to the chambers judge for further consideration as a result of allowing this appeal.

[36]         I would allow the appeal, include the Other Residents as members of the class, and certify the punitive damages issue as a common issue. I would leave the tasks of identifying the broader class and framing the common issue for the chambers judge.

Reasons for judgement were published today by the BC Court of Appeal expanding the scope of a class action lawsuit against ICBC to allow claims for punitive damages to be included in the claim.

In the recent case (Ari v. ICBC) ICBC was sued after an employee of theirs passed personal records ICBC kept to “an acquaintance involved in the drug trade” after which a series of attacks were carried out against some of the individuals who had their private information compromised.  The court noted the following background

[2]             A former employee of ICBC, Ms. Candy Elaine Rheaume, for no business purpose, accessed personal information of 78 ICBC customers (“Primary Plaintiffs”) who had been at or near the Justice Institute of British Columbia in New Westminster. The personal information included names, addresses, driver’s license numbers, vehicle descriptions and identification numbers, license plate numbers, and claims histories. Ms. Rheaume then provided the information to an acquaintance involved in the drug trade. She received $25.00 per name provided. She was charged with, and pleaded guilty to, fraudulently obtaining a computer service pursuant to s. 342.1 of the Criminal Code and received a suspended sentence with nine months probation.

[3]             The illegally obtained information was used to target 13 of the Primary Plaintiffs (“Attack Victims”) with vandalism, arson and shootings between April 2011 and January 2012 (“Attacks”). Two people have been found criminally responsible for their involvement in the Attacks. The attackers thought they were targeting police officers solely because the vehicles were parked at or near the Justice Institute.

The Plaintiff succeeded in certifying a class action lawsuit against ICBC on the basis that they should be vicariously liable for the employee’s wrongdoing.  The chambers judge hearing the certification application declined and include all class members the plaintiff sought to have included and also removed the claim for punitive damages.  In finding that punitive damages claims should form part of the proceeding the BC Court of Appeal provided the following reasons:

[29]         Punitive damages may be awarded when misconduct “represents a marked departure from ordinary standards of decent behaviour”: Whiten v. Pilot Insurance Co., 2002 SCC 18 at para. 36. Punitive damages may be certified as a common issue in appropriate cases. Rumley v. British Columbia, 2001 SCC 69 at para. 34.

[30]         Rather than consider the past history of breaches of privacy by ICBC employees—the evidence supported that at least 7 employees have been terminated by ICBC between 2008 and 2011 for privacy breaches—the chambers judge considered the steps taken since the breach in this case was discovered. While laudable on ICBC’s part, subsequent conduct is not the sole basis upon which punitive damages are determined. The chambers judge should have accepted as true the allegation that ICBC has a history of employees breaching private information. Instead, she judged the case on the merits on the evidence before her. That was an incorrect approach.

[31]         In my view, the chambers judge erred when she refused to certify punitive damages. There was a basis in fact for the claim based on the information relating to the history of privacy breaches by employees.

[32]         Before us, ICBC asked that if we overturn the failure to certify the issues, we return the case to the chambers judge for the analysis on preferability. This was the approach this Court took in Kirk v. Executive Flight Centre Fuel Services Ltd., 2019 BCCA 111 at para. 151.

[33]         With respect to the punitive damages issue, the chambers judge continued the analysis and concluded that had she not decided that there was no basis in fact for a claim for punitive damages, it would be an appropriate case for certification.

[34]         The chambers judge carefully analyzed the preferability of the issues she did certify. In respect of the Other Residents, her analysis is equally applicable. The common issues that were certified apply equally to the Other Residents. Some of the Other Residents will fall into the subclass.

[35]         A judge has a great deal of discretion to change things to fit the circumstances as a class proceeding progresses. At this point, there having been no discovery, it is my view that the additional classes and common issues are preferable for a class proceeding. I would not refer that issue back to the chambers judge for further consideration as a result of allowing this appeal.

[36]         I would allow the appeal, include the Other Residents as members of the class, and certify the punitive damages issue as a common issue. I would leave the tasks of identifying the broader class and framing the common issue for the chambers judge.

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