Southern Manitoba communities drenched, with some seeing more than 100 mm of precipitation

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Vehicles Owned by Dead People

GhostIn the time that I have been writing this column I have accumulated many different topics. The requests have been varied, but I must admit, I never would have come up with this week’s topic myself. A reader has asked about vehicles owned by dead people.

The question is not as far out as you might think, and has some very important legal considerations. The lawyer I spoke with to gather background information suggested that on the death of a sole registered owner, the plates be cancelled, a storage insurance policy be purchased, and the vehicle be parked until the estate is probated. If the vehicle is worth less than $10,000 and the spouse is registered as co-owner ICBC will allow the surviving spouse to change the registration to indicate that they are sole owner in order to continue to use the vehicle prior to probate.

If others continue to use the vehicle after the registered owner’s death, be sure all insurance companies with an interest in the vehicle are notified of the situation. Failure to do so could result in a denial of insurance coverage if the vehicle were damaged or stolen.

How does a deceased registered owner get a red light camera ticket, and how do the police require this person to give details regarding the driver if the vehicle is involved in a breach of the Motor Vehicle Act? The responsibility falls on the shoulders of the executor or administrator of the estate. This is the person the law places the burden on, and it can be a very heavy responsibility if things go wrong. My lawyer advisor strongly recommends that an executor get legal advice immediately on becoming involved with the administration of an estate.

Cst. Tim Schewe (Ret.) runs DriveSmartBC, a community web site about traffic safety in British Columbia. For 25 years he was an officer with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, including five years on general duty, 20 in traffic and 10 as a collision analyst responsible of conducting technical investigations of collisions. He retired from policing in 2006 but continues to be active in traffic safety through the DriveSmartBC web site, teaching seminars and contributing content to newspapers and web sites.

www.drivesmartbc.ca

Mera Signs Cannabis Supply Agreement with German Distributor

Mera Cannabis Corp. (“Mera” or the “Company“), has entered into a binding and non-exclusive supply agreement (the “Supply Agreement“) with HM HerbaMedica GMBH (“HerbaMedica“), situated in Berlin, Germany, pursuant to which HerbaMedica has agreed to purchase up to 600 kg of dried cannabis per year from Mera for a term of two years, subject to certain increase rights.

As part of Mera’s international development strategy, its flagship facility in St. Thomas, Ontario has been designed to adhere to EU-GMP standards. As a result, Mera expects the majority of its outputs from its domestic facilities to be sold to growing international medical markets. With a population of over 83 million and wide-spread statutory health insurance, Germany is poised to be a European powerhouse for medical cannabis.

“With partners like HerbaMedica, Mera has the opportunity to capitalize on its experience and insights acquired through domestic operations and utilize that knowledge in the EU. This agreement marks a significant milestone for both parties and will help bridge the gap between supply and demand in Germany,” says Zubin Jasavala, Chief Executive Officer of Mera.

“We are excited to be one of the few businesses working with Canadian producers to bring Canadian medical cannabis products into Germany. Mera not only provides access to high quality product, but a long-term strategy for growth in the medical market in Germany and across Europe,” David Höhne, Chief Executive Officer of HerbaMedica.

The obligations of the parties pursuant to the Supply Agreement are conditional upon, among other things, each of the parties obtaining all necessary licenses and authorizations, including import/export permits and EU-GMP certification.

About Mera Cannabis Corp.

Mera is focused on producing consumer-driven, high-value cannabis products at its EU-GMP built cultivation and processing facility in St Thomas, Ontario. It has two additional facilities currently under Health Canada licensing review in St. Thomas (processing) and Kingsville, Ontario (up to 1.2M sq. ft. of greenhouse cultivation), where the Company’s efforts are focused on medical cannabis product innovation. Additionally, through its wholly-owned subsidiary, Mera operates CannaWay Clinic, a national network of clinics specializing in cannabis treatment programs. Mera has also signed a letter of intent with the Maltese economic development agency, Malta Enterprise, to initiate the development of a medical cannabis production facility in Malta as a primary entry point into European medical cannabis markets. For more information about Mera, please visit meracannabis.com.

Forward Looking Statements

This press release contains “forward-looking information” within the meaning of applicable Canadian securities legislation which are based upon the Company’s current internal expectations, estimates, projections, assumptions and beliefs and views of future events. Forward-looking information can be identified by the use of forward-looking terminology such as “expect”, “likely”, “may”, “will”, “should”, “intend”, “anticipate”, “potential”, “proposed”, “estimate” and other similar words, including negative and grammatical variations thereof, or statements that certain events or conditions “may”, “would” or “will” happen, or by discussions of strategy. Forward-looking information include estimates, plans, expectations, opinions, forecasts, projections, targets, guidance or other statements that are not statements of fact.

Any forward-looking information speaks only as of the date on which it is made, and, except as required by law, the Company does not undertake any obligation to update or revise any forward-looking information, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise. New factors emerge from time to time, and it is not possible for the Company to predict all such factors. Such factors (including, an inability of the parties to obtain the necessary authorizations and licenses or to otherwise meet the conditions precedent contained in the Supply Agreement) could cause actual events or results to differ materially from those described in any forward-looking information.

SOURCE Mera Cannabis Corp.

How to avoid insurance fraud

 Sonnet Insurance, Canada’s digital insurance company, combats home and auto insurance fraud daily using sophisticated predictive data models, AI tools and analytics, and ongoing monitoring of behavioural patterns. Now, Sonnet wants to empower Canadians to recognize and prevent potentially harmful scams. Home and auto insurance seller fraud is common in all regions of Canada, especially the GTA1, where victims who don’t understand the process for purchasing home and auto insurance are targeted.

“Sonnet is committed to making insurance easier for Canadians to understand,” said Roger Dunbar, SVP, Sonnet. “Fraud impacts all Canadians and especially those who don’t understand local insurance regulations, so we want to educate the public on seller fraud.”

Seller fraud takes place when insurance policies are being sold to customers by fraudulent actors. Unlike claims fraud(using fake accidents or reports to cash in on real insurance policies), seller fraud leaves its victims open to a high degree of personal risk. A fraudster will offer discounted insurance and take the victims’ money in return for home and auto insurance pink slips that are invalid or forged.

Legitimate insurance policies are sold in Canada through registered brokers, licensed insurance agents, and regulated direct-to-consumer insurance companies:

  • A legitimate broker or agent is an individual or firm that sells insurance policies to clients and has a license number from their provincial regulator
  • Direct-to-consumer insurance companies (like Sonnet) are federally regulated and licensed to sell insurance policies directly to the end customer

Sonnet is doing everything possible to protect consumers against fraud – from plain language policy documents to simplifying the online insurance experience – and wants to educate the public on how to identify scams. A few key indicators can help tip off potential victims of insurance fraud, saving them from losing thousands of dollars and failing to have proper insurance coverage in place when it counts. Two of the most common seller scams in Canada are ‘ghost brokers’ and ‘fake brokers’.

Ghost Brokers take money for insurance upfront, provide a pink slip showing proof of insurance then disappear, or ‘ghost’ the customer. Sometimes the slip is simply a forgery. Other times the fraudster will set up an actual policy, download the slip and give it to the victim, then cancel the policy without the knowledge of the victim. What this scam looks like:

A new Canadian sees an ad for cheap insurance rates online and agrees to meet the ghost broker in a coffee shop with cash to pay a full year’s premiums. The ghost broker exchanges the cash for an insurance slip and pockets the money. The victim thinks the coverage is real until an inspection or accident prompts a check – and the insurance policy, along with the ghost broker, can’t be found.

Fake Brokers have an actual physical address and may do some legitimate business, such as selling or financing cars. Fake brokers purchase an insurance policy with the name of the client to secure an insurance slip. However, the policy will include incorrect information such as unlisted high-risk drivers or the wrong address, to obtain more favourable rates. Policies can be cancelled and claims can be denied if information is misrepresented, which makes it hard for the consumer to get insurance coverage in the future. Some fake brokers make money by charging a ‘broker fee’, while others are trying to clear the path to sell a car. In contrast, a certified broker makes a commission from insurance companies and never charges consumers directly for services. What this scam looks like:

An individual with a bad driving record has been quoted a high premium and sees an ad offering cheap insurance to high-risk drivers. The driver visits the fake broker and pays a lower premium to the fake broker in return for an auto insurance slip. The driver gets into another accident and discovers that the insurance policy contains misrepresented information and their policy is cancelled or claims won’t be paid out. After paying for damages out of pocket, the driver is unable to get standard insurance and opts to give up driving.

“In Canada, auto insurance is mandatory and highly regulated by the government,” added Dunbar. “Generally, if a deal looks too good to be true, it probably is. That is because insurance rates are based on pooled risk – companies need to collect enough money to pay out claims in a given year.”

Victims are encouraged to report fraudulent activity. Reporting fraud helps stop repeat offenders and reduces insurance premiums for everyone. To report fraud, visit the Insurance Bureau of Canada website here: report fraud.

Regulatory bodies issue regular warning notices about suspected fraudsters and offer additional resources. Trusted websites are the best place to check on licenses and suspicious activity. Find your provincial regulator here: insurance regulators.

Canadians looking to better understand home and auto insurance can view answers to frequently asked questions at sonnet.ca/FAQs.

About Sonnet Insurance

Launched in 2016, Sonnet Insurance Company (Sonnet) is a federally regulated insurance company. Our mission is to provide Canadians with an easy, transparent, and customized way to buy home and auto insurance online. Experience the future of insurance at Sonnet.ca, and say hello on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, and LinkedIn.

1 FSCO Survey, March 1, 2017 http://www.fsco.gov.on.ca/en/pubs/News-Releases/Pages/2017-mar1-fpm.aspx

SOURCE Sonnet Insurance Company

OPP reminds public to be vigilent of scams

Members of the Temiskaming Detachment of the Ontario Provincial Police would like to inform the public of several different types of frauds/scams in the Temiskaming  area.

Police would like to remind the public to be aware before providing any personal information or money. Police are suggesting to inquire about the company that is asking for your personal information such as your bank account, computer information. Listed below are some of the recent scams investigated by the OPP.

The Romance Scam – Fraudsters take advantage of people who are lonesome. They may steal other profile photos to make themselves appear like someone else, use social media and lure victims. They may rush into the relationship, and promise a wedding or expensive items, once they meet in the victim’s country, or they may continue the online relationship over an extent of time to develop a trust level which usually results in the victim losing a significant amount of money, and the victim never actually meeting their so called partner.

Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) Scam – If you receive a fraudulent communication by email, phone, text, mail, from someone that claims to be the CRA and they request personal information, these are scams and never respond.

The CRA will never send you a link and ask you to divulge personal or financial information.

Compromised Credit Cards – Fraudsters have been calling the public lately claiming to be employees from the fraud department at a bank. They proceed to advise people that their credit card has been compromised and in order to verify they have the right account, to please read them your credit card number. In these cases, the fraudsters already have your name and first four digits on the Visa or MasterCard. This tactic is used to make them sound legitimate.

Do not divulge any personal information related to credit cards or banking particulars over the phone, by email, letter, fax, or any other means of communication. Call your credit card company or financial institution on your terms to verify/report any suspicious activity.

If you believe that someone is posing as a fraudster on the phone, hang up. Also, you can file a complaint through the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre at 1-888-495-8501. If you are a victim of a fraud or scam, contact your local police agency.

Important Safety Tips to Remember:

  • Before giving money, ask questions. If the organization is legitimate, they welcome questions and will provide reasonable answers;
  • Never provide personal information through the internet or email;
  • Keep your passwords and PIN’s a secret;
  • Do not write down passwords or carry them with you;
  • Shred unwanted documents and make sure that your name and social insurance numbers are secure;
  • Ask a trusted friend/relative/neighbour to pick up your mail when you are away or ask that a hold be placed on delivery.

FRAUD…Recognize it …Report it …Stop it

LEARN MORE

If you suspect you may be the victim of fraud or have been tricked into giving personal or financial information, contact your local OPP detachment at 1-888-310-1122 or the (Link) Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre at 1-888-495-8501.

The Government of Canada Competition Bureau: aims to increase your awareness of the many types of fraud that target Canadians and offer some easy steps you can take to protect yourself and avoid falling victim to fraud.

Source;

Northern News

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