V² Streamlines Underwriting Process for Small to Midsize Accounts

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Canada Protection Plan Launches Express Elite Life Insurance Plan to Simplify Application Process

TORONTO — Canada Protection Plan, a leading provider of No Medical and Simplified life insurance, today announced the launch of Express Elite Term, a no-medical life insurance product. In 15 minutes or less, Canadians and newcomers with a work permit who are in excellent health and between the ages of 18-60 years can apply either by phone or online. Within a few days, they can receive coverage for up to $500,000 with no medical exams required.

“Our clients deserve to be rewarded for maintaining a well-balanced lifestyle,” said Michael Aziz, Chief Distribution Officer, Canada Protection Plan. “We developed Express Elite because we recognize that while life insurance is an important part of financial planning, time is in short supply for many Canadians. As consumer tastes change, we’re developing innovative insurance solutions that fit with the desire for a simple, fast, and convenient experience.”

Payments begin in the second month on a monthly payment system. In addition to offering $100,000 to $500,000 in coverage, Express Elite offers 20-year and 30-year terms as well as complimentary benefits including emergency financial assistance programs and scholarships. The policy is also renewable up to age 80 and convertible to age 70.

Express Elite is available through more than 23,000 licensed advisors across the country, or with Canada Protection Plan (www.cpp.ca) at 1-877-447-6060.

About Canada Protection Plan
Canada Protection Plan, one of Canada’s leading providers of No Medical and Simplified Issue life insurance, is a Canadian owned and operated corporation that designs, markets and sells life insurance and related products with simplified underwriting processes that require no medical exams on many of their plans. The company is dedicated to providing life insurance protection against unexpected events at a competitive price by offering numerous product choices and purchase options, making insurance coverage easily obtainable.

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20190529005072/en/

Beazley unveils streamlined insurance policy for media and tech industry

New York, May 28, 2019 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Specialist insurer Beazley has updated its MediaTech insurance policy to keep pace with the rapidly evolving technology market and cyber threat landscape faced by firms as they seek to innovate and grow.

Media and technology businesses are at the forefront of developing and applying new tools and systems. They need assurance that they are not only covered by a policy but also supported by expert risk management services that help reduce their exposure.

The Beazley MediaTech policy has been streamlined to provide clear and concise wording and seamless protection, combining comprehensive errors and omissions (E&O) and media liability insurance with cyber coverage.

As well as accessing Beazley’s newest, more comprehensive E&O coverage, businesses will benefit from our team’s experience in managing thousands of claims. E&O claims have involved software failures, hardware defects, implementation errors and downtime, as well as intellectual property rights and personal injury disputes arising from media content.

Beazley’s E&O and media coverage includes:

  • Broad professional liability to address the need to cover non-technology professional services
  • Unintentional breach of contract for professional liability exposure
  • Online and offline media, including content published on social media
  • A wide range of trade secret misappropriation claims
  • Unfair competition alleged with copyright or trademark infringement
  • Mental anguish and emotional distress
  • Defamation, invasion of privacy and plagiarism.

Cyber coverage has also been incorporated into the policy. This includes:

  • breach response costs
  • first-party coverage for cyber extortion
  • data recovery costs
  • business interruption and dependent business interruption resulting from security breaches and system failures
  • e-crime coverage for fraudulent instruction fraud, funds transfer fraud and telephone fraud.

To ensure clients can reduce their cyber exposure and be prepared in the event they fall victim to a breach, Beazley offers access to a full suite of pre-breach and risk management services through our in-house Beazley Breach Response Services team.

Bob Wice, Beazley’s head of US cyber & tech, said: “Beazley MediaTech has been designed to protect firms that are at the cutting edge of using and developing new technology in exciting and often experimental ways. We’ve enhanced our offering to ensure it keeps pace with the evolving risk landscape.

“Our policy is underpinned by a market-leading claims service, provided by our cyber & tech claims team, which understands the liabilities technology companies face and will provide first-class support in the event of a loss.”

Note to editors:

Beazley plc (BEZ.L) is the parent company of specialist insurance businesses with operations in Europe, the US, Canada, Latin America and Asia. Beazley manages six Lloyd’s syndicates and in 2018 underwrote gross premiums worldwide of $2,615 million. All Lloyd’s syndicates are rated A by A.M. Best.

Beazley’s underwriters in the United States focus on writing a range of specialist insurance products. In the admitted market, coverage is provided by Beazley Insurance Company, Inc., an A.M. Best A rated carrier licensed in all 50 states. In the surplus lines market, coverage is provided by the Beazley syndicates at Lloyd’s.

Beazley is a market leader in many of its chosen lines, which include professional indemnity, property, marine, reinsurance, accident and life, and political risks and contingency business

District research finds cost of basic insurance more in B.C. than in other provinces

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Court rules B.C. can’t limit oil shipments in major blow for pipeline fight

By Laura Kane

THE CANADIAN PRESS

VANCOUVER _ British Columbia lost the largest tool in its toolbox to halt the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion with a court decision Friday that concluded it can’t restrict oil shipments through its borders.

The unanimous ruling from the B.C. Court of Appeal represented a major win for the project, which the federal government and Alberta see as crucial to getting more oilsands crude to overseas markets.

B.C.’s minority NDP government, which took power on a promise to use every tool available to stop the expansion, swiftly announced plans to appeal to the Supreme Court of Canada.

“Our government said from the outset that we would stand up for British Columbia’s environment, our economy and our coast,” said Attorney General David Eby.  “Thousands of jobs and billions of dollars in economic activity would be put at risk by a diluted bitumen spill.”

The province filed a constitutional reference question to the Appeal Court that asked whether it had the authority to create a permitting regime for companies that wished to increase their flow of diluted bitumen.

A five-judge panel agreed that the amendments to B.C.’s Environmental Management Act were not constitutional because they would interfere with the federal government’s exclusive jurisdiction over interprovincial pipelines.

Justice Mary Newbury wrote on behalf of the panel that the overall aim of the proposed amendments was to place conditions on and, if necessary, prohibit the movement of heavy oil through a federal undertaking.

Newbury also wrote that the legislation is not just a general environmental law, but is targeted at one substance in one interprovincial pipeline: the Trans Mountain expansion project.

“Immediately upon coming into force, it would prohibit the operation of the expanded Trans Mountain pipeline in the province until such time as a provincially appointed official decided otherwise,” she said.

“This alone threatens to usurp the role of the (National Energy Board), which has made many rulings and imposed many conditions to be complied with by Trans Mountain for the protection of the environment.”

The energy board is the body entrusted with regulating the flow of resources across Canada to export markets, Newbury wrote.

B.C. argued that the proposed amendments were meant to protect its environment from a hazardous substance, while the federal government and Alberta said the goal was to block Trans Mountain.

Alberta Premier Jason Kenney said the decision is an occasion for “real hope” for hard-working people and the project will allow his province to realize a fair price for its resources and create new jobs.

“In light of the court’s decision, we hope that the B.C. government will respect the rule of law and end its campaign of obstruction,” he said.

Kenney also said the expansion could provide much-needed relief at B.C. pumps. Premier John Horgan has disputed that the project would ease sky-high gas prices, noting its purpose is to transport heavy oil for shipment overseas.

Trans Mountain Corp. said it agreed that the legislation was unconstitutional and it shares the value that Canadians and B.C. residents place on the environment.

Eby said his government originally asked Canada to join it in a reference case before the Supreme Court. The federal government declined, so B.C. had to first file its case with the provincial Appeal Court, he said.

The Supreme Court of Canada automatically hears provincial reference questions. Eby said the top court has overturned unanimous B.C. Appeal Court judgments in the past and the cost of pursuing the case was worth it.

“It is a fraction of a fraction of the cost of a diluted bitumen spill,” he said.

Saskatchewan, Enbridge Inc. and the Canadian Association of Oil Producers argued in court against B.C.’s proposed permit regime, while some First Nations, cities and environmental groups supported it.

The Haida and Heiltsuk Nations said the decision was a missed opportunity for reconciliation because it failed to acknowledge their arguments about the role of Indigenous governments in environmental protection.

Heiltsuk Chief Coun. Marilyn Slett called the ruling  “offensive and irresponsible.”

“It is unacceptable that despite being granted interested party status, the court failed to even acknowledge ours or any other Indigenous governments’ arguments in its decision. They invited us into the room, but they completely ignored us,” she said in a statement.

Lawyer Kegan Pepper-Smith represented Ecojustice in the case and said the decision leaves B.C., its communities and environment exposed to a potentially disastrous spill.

There is still plenty the B.C. government could do to stop the Trans Mountain expansion, such as adding conditions to its provincial environmental certificate, said Peter McCartney, a climate campaigner with the Wilderness Committee.

The proposed amendments would have meant that Trans Mountain Corp. and any other company wishing to increase the amount of heavy oil it transported through B.C. would have had to apply for a “hazardous substance permit.”

The permit application would have had to detail the risks to human health and the environment from a spill plans to mitigate those risks and financial measures, including insurance, that ensured payment of cleanup costs.

A provincial public servant would have had the authority to impose conditions on a hazardous substance permit and cancel or suspend the permit if the company did not comply.

B.C. announced the amendments last year, prompting then-Alberta premier Rachel Notley to ban B.C. wines. After Horgan promised to file a reference case asking whether the amendments were constitutional, Notley cancelled the wine ban.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s government has purchased the Trans Mountain pipeline and expansion project for $4.5 billion. Construction was paused last August after the Federal Court of Appeal overturned the federal permits.

The project would triple the pipeline’s capacity to carry diluted bitumen from the Edmonton area to Metro Vancouver and increase the number of tankers in Burrard Inlet seven-fold.

Newfoundland & Labrador – Glen L.C. Noel, Q.C., in insurance law is now a judge

Cox & Palmer is proud to share that Glen L.C. Noel, Q.C., has been appointed a Judge of the Supreme Court of Newfoundland and Labrador and a Judge ex officio of the Court of Appeal of Newfoundland and Labrador.

Since 1990, Glen has worked exclusively with Cox & Palmer (and its predecessor firms), building an extensive practice for almost 30 years in insurance law, commercial insurance litigation, and personal injury law. Consistently recognized as a leading practitioner, Glen’s dedication to the legal profession, commitment to his clients and professional integrity have been paramount to the success of Cox & Palmer.

Albeit managing a demanding practice, Glen has an innate ability to approach every situation with sound judgement and definitive resolve. Steadily encouraging fairness, inclusion and comradery, Glen’s positive influence inspires all those around him. A true leader, Glen always makes time for his colleagues and has been an exceptional mentor and friend to the entire team at Cox & Palmer.

We are honoured to have him serve the Province of Newfoundland and Labrador as Justice Noel, and we are tremendously proud to congratulate him on this well-deserved achievement.

Read the media release from the Government of Canada.

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