UPS tests residential delivery via drone launched from atop package car

UPS (NYSE: UPS) announced that it has successfully tested a drone that launches from the top of a UPS® package car, autonomously delivers a package to a home and then returns to the vehicle while the delivery driver continues along the route to make a separate delivery.

UPS conducted the test on Monday in Tampa, Fla. with Workhorse Group (NASDAQ: WKHS) an Ohio-based battery-electric truck and drone developer. Workhorse built the drone and the electric UPS package car used in the test.

“This test is different than anything we’ve done with drones so far. It has implications for future deliveries, especially in rural locations where our package cars often have to travel kilometres to make a single delivery,” said Mark Wallace, senior vice-president of global engineering and sustainability, UPS. “Imagine a triangular delivery route where the stops are kilometres apart by road. Sending a drone from a package car to make just one of those deliveries can reduce costly kilometres driven. This is a big step toward bolstering efficiency in our network and reducing our emissions at the same time.”

UPS has about 102,000 delivery drivers on the road each day. Rural delivery routes are the most expensive to serve due to the time and vehicle expenses required to complete each delivery. In this test, the drone made one delivery while the driver continued down the road to make another. This is a possible role UPS envisions for drones in the future.

“Drivers are the face of our company, and that won’t change,” Wallace said. “What’s exciting is the potential for drones to aid drivers at various points along their routes, helping them save time and deliver on increasing customer service needs that stem from the growth of e-commerce.”

The drone used in yesterday’s test was the Workhorse HorseFly™ UAV Delivery system. It is a high-efficiency, octocopter delivery drone that is fully integrated with Workhorse’s line of electric/hybrid delivery trucks. The drone docks on the roof of the delivery truck. A cage suspended beneath the drone, extends through a hatch into the truck. A UPS driver inside loads a package into the cage and presses a button on a touch screen, sending the drone on a preset autonomous route to an address. The battery-powered HorseFly drone recharges while it’s docked. It has a 30-minute flight time and can carry a package weighing up to 10 lb.

For this test, Workhorse preset the route for the drone. But in the future, routes could be determined by UPS’s On-Road Integrated Optimization and Navigation (ORION), which is the company’s proprietary routing software.

“It’s wonderful to see this technology applied in such a practical way,” said Stephen Burns, Workhorse founder and CEO. “The drone is fully autonomous. It doesn’t require a pilot. So the delivery driver is free to make other deliveries while the drone is away.”

UPS has been testing automation and robotics technologies, including drones, for years. Last September, UPS staged a mock delivery of urgently needed medicine from Beverly, Mass. to an island three miles off the Atlantic coast. Additionally, UPS is using drones extensively for humanitarian relief, partnering with third-party organizations to deliver life-saving blood and vaccines to hard-to-reach locations in Rwanda. UPS also is utilizing drones to check inventory on high storage shelves in its warehouses.

Unlike all of the previous tests, the most recent UPS drone test shows how drones might assist in making non-urgent residential deliveries as part of the day-to-day operation.

Last year, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) issued small unmanned aircraft systems rules that allow for some commercial use of drones and paved the way for future expanded applications. UPS was one of 35 selected from a cross section of key stakeholders to serve on the FAA’s drone advisory committee. The committee will provide the FAA recommendations on key drone integration issues that will ultimately allow for safe and secure operations of drones within the National Air Space System.

About UPS
UPS (NYSE: UPS) is a global leader in logistics, offering a broad range of solutions including transporting packages and freight; facilitating international trade, and deploying advanced technology to more efficiently manage the world of business. Headquartered in Atlanta, UPS serves more than 220 countries and territories worldwide. The company can be found on the web at ups.com and its corporate blog can be found at longitudes.ups.com. To get UPS news direct, visit pressroom.ups.com/RSS or follow @UPS_Canada.

About Workhorse Group Inc. Workhorse Group, Inc. (NASDAQ: WKHS) is a U.S. – based original equipment manufacturer of medium duty EPA-approved battery-electric delivery vehicles and fully integrated truck-launched, FAA compliant unmanned aerial systems (UAS) delivery drones. Workhorse trucks have historically been sold to the largest fleets in the USA and Canada for last-mile delivery and related uses. For additional information visit www.workhorse.com

SOURCE UPS Canada Ltd.

Five ways to detect a malicious ‘phishing’ email

Carbonite.com

Phishing email scams generally fall into one of these categories:

  • Traditional phishing attack
    The traditional phishing attack casts a wide net and attempts to trick as many people as possible. A classic example of this is the Nigerian prince advance-fee scam.
  • Spear phishing
    Spear phishing attacks are designed to target a specific individual or small group of individuals. For example, a spear phishing attack my use information about a particular restaurant or small business to target one or more employees at that business. Or it could look like an email from a friend.
  • Whaling
    Whaling attacks, which have become increasingly popular in recent years, are targeted at high-profile victims like C-level executives and their teams. A typical whaling email may look like it was sent from the CEO of your company. But it’s really a fake designed to get you to share valuable information about the company.

Protect yourself from phishing scams
Phishing emails may be more difficult to identify these days, but there are some important steps you can take to avoid becoming a victim. If you answer ‘yes’ to any of the questions below, there’s a very good chance that you’re looking at a phishing email.

1.  Does the message ask for personal information?
Always remember that reputable businesses do not ask for personal information – such as social security and credit card numbers – via email.

2. Does the offer seem too good to be real?
If it seems too good to be true, it’s a fake. Beware of emails offering big rewards – vacations, cash prizes, etc. – for little effort.

3. Does the salutation look odd?
Reputable companies will use your name in the salutation – as opposed to “valued customer” or “to whom it may concern.”

4. Does the email have mismatched URLs?
If you receive an email from an organization that includes an HTML link in it, hover your mouse over the link without clicking and you should see the full URL appear. If the URL does not include the organization’s exact name, or if it looks suspicious in any other way, delete it because it’s probably a phishing email. Also, you should only visit websites that begin with ‘https’ because the ‘s’ at the end indicates advanced security measures. Websites that begin with “http” are not as secure.

5. Does it give you a suspicious feeling?
Trust your instincts when it comes to email. If you catch yourself wondering whether it’s legitimate, and your instinct is to ignore and delete it—then pay attention to that gut check.

Kanye West’s Saint Pablo Tour Cancellation: Will Insurance Cover It?

Excerpted article was written By Dan Rys’s | Billboard.com

(Nov. 2Kanye West poses before Christian Dior 2015-2016 fall/winter ready-to-wear collection fashion show on March 6, 2015 in Paris. 1), after a rep for Kanye West confirmed that the remaining 21 dates of his Saint Pablo Tour would be canceled, Billboard estimated it would result in the refunding of more than 300,000 tickets, worth $27.3 million. At the time, however, the big unknown was why West canceled the dates, leaving open the question of whether insurance would cover the costs of shutting down the tour.

Last night, West was placed under observation at a Los Angeles-area hospital, and a source told Billboard he was suffering from exhaustion and sleep deprivation. And while there is little to no further information about West’s condition or the specific reasoning for canceling the tour dates, exhaustion raises several possibilities in terms of West’s potential financial liabilities.

Assuming West had insurance for his Saint Pablo Tour, a standard policy within the music industry would cover an “accident to or illness of any insured person which, in the opinion of an independent medical practitioner approved by the underwriters, entirely prevents any insured person from appearing or continuing to appear in any or all of the insured performances or events.”

Kanye West’s Saint Pablo Tour Cancellation: What’s the Damage?

Essentially, that would require a third party medical practitioner to determine whether or not West’s exhaustion would physically allow him to continue. But it also would typically come with exclusions: for instance, if the exhaustion was due to drug use, sexually-transmitted diseases, “unreasonable or capricious behavior” — which would include cancellations as a result of excessive partying or similar behavior — and whether there was a pre-existing condition, meaning if the person had a history of exhaustion or a previously-diagnosed and undisclosed illness.

A fairly textbook example of a situation that would be covered by this type of policy is Lady Gaga‘s 2013 Born This Way Ball Tour. With 22 dates to go on the trek, Gaga suffered a labral tear in her right hip that required surgery, forcing her to cancelthe remaining shows on the tour and causing $25 million worth of ticket refunds. Gaga’s injury clearly would have been covered by this type of insurance, including expenses related to shutting down the tour, advertising costs and lost revenues for both the promoter and performer.

Again, however, West’s situation is slightly different, and there is no clear answer.

“[The policy] is often invoked very quickly for specific injury or illness that is diagnosed easily,” says Paul Bassman, president/CEO of Ascend Insurance Brokerage, one of the top insurance firms in the music industry. “Exhaustion would definitely be harder to prove, but I wouldn’t say it’s impossible.”

 Kanye West Hospitalized

Live Nation, the promoter for the Saint Pablo Tour, likely has its own policy, which generally differs from an artist’s policy by not carrying exclusions for things like drug use, capricious behavior or other situations, though the independent medical evaluation would still be required. That could leave open a situation where Live Nation would be covered for its own expenses, including its guarantees to West (if they are responsible for paying those guarantees in the event of a cancellation), while if West’s condition was not deemed to be covered by his insurance policy, he may still be on the hook.

For now there is little to do but hope that West is getting the treatment he requires, while any definitive judgment is too early to assess. “We just don’t know enough about why he cancelled,” Bassman adds. “Until more information is available on the specifics of the cancellation, it’s not possible to determine whether this will be covered by insurance or not.”

#BullyingAwarenessWeek: How Should Managers Deal With Workplace Bullies?

anti-bullying-courses

If a manager or supervisor is told that one employee is bullying another, they must address the issue. But before company leaders can confront the person responsible, they need to identify that bullying has indeed taken place and confirm the facts. The following is a basic three-step plan of action:

Step 1: Identify what is considered bullying in the workplace. Workplace bullying can be described as repetitive, deliberate verbal, non-verbal and even physical actions directed against a co-worker or subordinate for the sole purpose of dominating and controlling. Such behaviour is damaging and can result in severe psychological or physical harm to the victim.

Step 2: Confirm the facts and develop a plan to confront the bully. Once bullying has been identified, it is the supervisor/manager’s responsibility to confirm the facts, prepare documentation, and develop a plan to confront the bully. Confirming facts will help you understand the extent of damage that may have been done to the victim. If there are enough facts to confront the bully, prepare a plan.
Consult any appropriate partners such as human resources personnel and determine what consequences – anything from written discipline to termination – may be considered. The plan must be sensitive to the needs of the victim, who may need support through an employee assistance program.

Step 3: Schedule a meeting to confront the bully. Determine the time and location of the meeting, as well as who will be involved, and prepare a script. In a private space, facilitate the following conversation:

  • Explain the purpose of the meeting. In a clear and assertive tone, explain that the employee has been linked to bullying and that this conversation is to address that. For example: “John, I have asked to meet with you to discuss the following facts … and our position on this matter. Do you understand why you’re here?”
  • Verify with the employee why they are there. This gives the individual time to understand the seriousness of the conversation and allows the leader to evaluate how the employee is going to manage their emotions. If the employee or leader becomes overly emotional, stop the conversation and start again only when everyone is calm.
  • Present the facts and concerns, and outline the consequences. This is to ensure that the employee understands that this is not a negotiation; it’s a reporting of the facts. The ultimate goal is for the employee to accept responsibility for his or her actions. Facts: “John, you were observed … ” (Share the facts, history, evidence and the organization’s position.) Concerns: “John, bullying behaviour is not acceptable in this organization and it will not be tolerated. Do you understand the concern and expectation to stop any behaviours that could be perceived as bullying?” Employee’s response: Give the employee a chance to admit responsibility, ask questions about what they need to do, show remorse, apologize and commit to changing their behaviour. Consequences: Inform the employee how the matter will be dealt with. A union representative may need to be involved.
  • Frame an action plan. Outline the steps the employee must comply with to continue their employment. “John, the first step is to stop bullying X immediately. You will be expected to …” Leave nothing to assumption. Get the employee to agree to those expectations.
  • Review the plan. Review the expected behaviour, how the plan will be monitored, any disciplinary action, the impact on the employee’s record, future consequences if there is a relapse, and the frequency of follow-up. A written plan may help the employee follow the guidelines.

Effective leaders must embrace the challenge of making sure their workplace is free of bullying. ILScorp offers additional resources to help both employers and employees prevent and manage bullying in the workplace, and ensure compliance with workplace legislation.

Ontario, Manitoba, Québec and Saskatchewan have already introduced legislation against bullying and B.C. recently enacted Bill 14 [Workers Compensation Amendment Act] to address the effects of bullying at work. Become compliant with existing laws. Complete ILScorp’s “Understanding Workplace Bullying & Tools for Safeguarding an Organization from Bullying Behaviour” courses.

This course is included free of charge as part of ILScorp your group subscription. This course is General and Adjuster CE accredited, however ILScorp recommends that all employees receive this training for law compliance.

Excerpted from the Globe and Mail, written by Bill Howatt, the president of Howatt HR Consulting and founder of TalOp, in Kentville, N.S.

Excerpted article from ILScorp’s Blog

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Ways to Become More Productive

rationalizer2

Time: it’s the one thing no one will ever have enough of and many mismanage. Even if one begins their day with a “to-do” list and good intent, it’s too common a scenario to fail achieving the day’s agenda by the end of the work day. That is, unless one possesses good work ethic and self motivation.

Thankfully, being productive is a skill which can be learned. By adopting the following habits, you, too, may learn how to better utilize your resources and become more productive.

1. Have a plant on your desk

Sound silly? This latest study found that people with a plant on their desk are 40% more productive and creative. If you’re seeking a promotion or just wanting to check more items off your list, having a plant nearby will produce more oxygen, reduce stress, reduce airborne molds and bacteria in the air, and even boost your immune system.

2. Visit your goals every day

If you need constant inspiration to stay on track, make a habit of looking over your short-term and long-term goals every day. A good habit is to contemplate, plan, and visualize your goals for five minutes every morning over your breakfast or hot tea.

3. Know when to say “yes” and “no”

In order to feel accepted, many feel they need to say ‘yes’ to every request. Pride your time and abilities, and only engage in those projects which support your elite productivity.

4. Sell your T.V.

Instead of watching others and their success, use the time you’d spend in front of the silver god to invest in your own dreams.

5. Sort your relationships

If you seek success and a fulfilled, happy life, be willing to say goodbye to energy vampires. Individuals that drain your energy or constantly harp on your goals are only holding you back from realizing your unlimited potential.

6. Keep Organized

Mess creates stress. Clean it up and work in an environment that is conducive to your studies.

7. Stop Multitasking

New research confirms that distractions common in modern day living are rewiring the way the brain works. (And are dropping the average IQ by 5 points!) Choose one task to focus on and give it all of your attention.

8. Get Fit

Take care of yourself first so you can be as efficient as possible. Being in peak physical condition can create explosive energy, renew your focus, and heighten your creativity.

9. Adopt Routine

The lives of highly productive and creative men, like Thomas Edison, John Grisham, and Stephen King, follow strict daily routines. Peak productivity is not about luck, it’s about devotion. Be willing to set a schedule (get up, start work, exercise, and relax) and stick to it.

10. Work chunks at a time

Working for 90 minute blocks with a ten minute break will allow your brain’s RNA to replenish. It’s then easier to go back to your work refueled. (Spirulina, the blue-green algae, also replenishes your brain’s RNA which can make you more productive).

11. Use your commute time

If you’re spending thirty minutes traveling one way per day, in one year you’ve spent 6 weeks of 8 hour days in your car. Listen to an inspirational audiobook, podcast, or study materials while you carpool with another individual.

12. Get lost

Escape to a quiet zone where there are no distractions. Turn off your devices and let yourself create, write, plan, and create. With intense focus, you will achieve massive results.

13. Drink more water

When you’re dehydrated, it’s more difficult to think; you’ll also experience a loss of energy. Begin your day with 8 oz of water (optimally with lime or lemon juice) and boost your body’s hydration.

By adopting these habits, you’ll discover how productive life can be. Dare to dream big and accomplish the unthinkable.

By: Amanda Froelich, trueactivist.com

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10 Tips For Businesses: National Cyber Security Awareness Month

Now is a good time for businesses to review their cybersecurity practices. It is tempting to think that “it can’t happen to me”, but in the wake of Yahoo’s recent admission that personal data was hacked, it is clear that this can happen to anyone.

Of course, technological safeguards are critical to security, however operations and policy play a crucial role as well. The steps outlined below focus on tips  that involve measures that go beyond technology.

  1. Plan on a Prudent Response. In a 2015 study commissioned by the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada, only 41% of surveyed companies stated that they had policies or procedures in place that dealt with data breaches where there was a compromise of customer personal information. If an Incident Response Plan is made ahead of time in order to deal with a cybersecurity breach, a company will be in a position to respond quickly in a manner that mitigates harm to the business and to third parties (such as customers). Companies who do not make such a Plan are often caught flat-footed and fumble through an incident, and increase the risk of complaints to regulators and class action or other lawsuits.
  2. Build an Effective and Safe Cybersecurity Workforce. Robust recruitment processes that properly vet candidates will help ensure that the hiring of problematic employees is avoided. Unfortunately, many attacks come from inside an organization. Background checks are an important tool in the screening process. Employees play a key role in helping to prevent cybersecurity incidents. Proper training is key, and will enable employees to spot suspicious activities and events, and report them to the appropriate personnel. Employees are the single most important group of people who can help to reduce unintentional errors and technological  vulnerabilities.
  3. Make Continuing Education a Practice. It was recently reported in the news that the World Anti-Doping Agency was hacked by a Russian cyber group known as “Fancy Bear”. The group accessed confidential medical data of athletes because a password was obtained through spear phishing (generally an e-mail that appears to be from someone the recipient knows and trusts – such as someone in a position of authority in the recipient’s company). News reports about incidents like this should be shared and discussed with employees as they provide an opportunity for companies to educate and share information with personnel about cyber risks.
  4. Create an Incident Response Team. If a cybersecurity breach occurs, a business must act quickly. The establishment of an Incident Response Team will make the business nimble and mitigate harm. Key stakeholders to be included on the Team may include executive leaders/decision makers, IT and security, marketing and business development  (media and other third-party notifications), legal (breach and notification obligations and protection from potential litigation), privacy and human resources.
  5. Have a Lead Person. The Incident Response Team needs a lead who is primarily responsible for dealing with an incident and whose duties include (i) conducting an initial immediate assessment of an incident, (ii) determining the extent to which the information, system or network is impaired, (iii) reaching out to the Incident Response Team (and other appropriate personnel) depending upon the initial assessment, and (iv) being the main point of contact.
  6. Create Relationships with Third Party Service Providers. It is best to retain third-party contacts for the purpose of a cyberbreach response before the incident occurs. Common sense dictates that it will be less expensive and more efficient if third-party engagements are considered by a company and finalized before (as opposed to after) a cyberbreach. Potential service providers include legal (assess and deal with breach notification obligations to third parties), public relations firms (deal with reputation management) and forensics.  In-house IT resources are useful to take the machines/system offline and preserve evidence – but third-party forensics may be required to investigate and remediate the incident to get the organization back in business.
  7. Consider Cyber Insurance. Traditional insurance coverage may help deal with risks and potential losses posed by cyber risks to a certain extent, but cyber insurance policies extend coverage. Cyber insurance may be purchased separately or may run parallel with existing insurance at an increased premium. Both first-party coverage and third-party coverage are available. First-party coverage insures the policyholder from a loss resulting from a cybersecurity incident and third-party coverage covers the policyholder regarding liabilities to outside entities as a result of an incident. Third-party coverage may help with crisis management including public relations expenses related to dealing with a response to the incident. First-party coverage may also extend to payments to cyber extortionists who threaten to disclose sensitive confidential information unless their demands are met.
  8. Be Careful About What You Say Today. Sometimes online privacy policies and other publications of a company make statements about security such as the company has “implemented reasonable and appropriate means to protect personal information against unauthorized access.” In a US case, a court held that the foregoing statement was deceptive in light of the company’s actual cybersecurity practices. A company risks liability if it makes statements to the public about cybersecurity that are not readily justified by the facts. Be wary about merely copying and pasting text into privacy policies and other publications.
  9. Be Prepared – Identify Disclosure Obligations. It is best to keep abreast of privacy breach notifications and obligations imposed by legislation in each jurisdiction where a company does business.  The rules are not uniform, and some preparation will help a company to respond to an incident efficiently. The legal landscape is changing. Canada’s Digital Privacy Act passed in June, 2015 will require an organization to notify the Privacy Commissioner and affected individuals of any “breach of security safeguards involving personal information under the organization’s control, if it is reasonable in the circumstances to believe that the breach creates a real risk of significant harm to an individual”. It is anticipated that these data breach disclosure obligations will come into force when final regulations are passed.
  10. Work on “Operational Security” (OPSEC). OPSEC is a term originating in the military. In the context of cybersecurity, it involves (i) identifying the information that is most critical to successful business operations (such as customer lists and other contact information), (ii) analysis of the likely cyber criminals who may attempt to obtain critical information, (iii) identification of the potential vulnerabilities regarding the protection of critical information (such as poorly secured mobile devices that have access to the critical information), (iv) investigation of measures to mitigate each vulnerability, and (v) implementation of measures based upon the cost of implementing each measure against the harmful effects of a cybersecurity breach.

The content of this article is intended to provide a general guide to the subject matter. Specialist advice should be sought about your specific circumstances.

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