Canada’s first medical pot coverage plan and savings calculator launched

BuyWell.com, the first fully integrated Health and Wellness Marketplace in Canada, has introduced BuyWell Care. The new program is the country’s first guaranteed issue Medical Cannabis Coverage Plan and Medical Cannabis Savings Calculator.

By inputting the form of cannabis and dosage the calculator recommended to them into the BuyWell Care calculator, patients can determine how much they can save on their medical cannabis while purchasing coverage plans through the online application process. The coverage included in the program includes treatments that use cannabis oils, dried flowers, and gel capsules.

“BuyWell Care’s inclusion of coverage for medical cannabis is a true example of the paradigm shift that’s sweeping through the medical landscape,” said Dr. Ira Price, MD, FRCPC, and medical director of Synergy Health Services. “It’s a breath of fresh air.”

Research and findings from Synergy Health Services suggest that BuyWell Care Consumers may realize savings of up to $5,700 per year on their medical cannabis, depending on their province of residence.

“For hard-working Canadians who rely on medical cannabis as part of their treatment regimen, BuyWell Care’s Medical Cannabis Coverage Plan provides a revolutionary way to save money on their expensive medication,” said Amanda LeBlanc, co-founder of BuyWell.com.

Buyers in Ontario can immediately avail of coverage; for those in other provinces, coverages will be available beginning in Q1 of 2019.

Source: Life | Health Professional

Want to Know If Someone Is Trustworthy? Here’s what to look for

Want to Know If Someone Is Trustworthy? Here’s what to look for

By Wanda Marie Thibodeaux | INC.

These 15 signs are dead giveaways that you’re dealing with a keeper:

 

1. They are consistent.

A trustworthy person will use roughly the same behavior and language in any situation. They have the self-control to maintain character and follow through on what they say they’ll do, even when they are tempted to walk it back. They won’t wear different masks or pretend they’re someone they’re not just to impress. Switching gears comes from having learned reliable new information, not from self-serving whims. What’s more, what they say matches what you hear from others.

 

2. They show compassion and humility.

Both these traits demonstrate that the person can think of others well and doesn’t consider themselves as more important than anyone else. Because they are more outwardly focused, they’re less likely to step on your toes or betray you to get something they need or want.

 

3. They respect boundaries.

Trustworthy individuals don’t try to impose their will on others because they don’t feel the need to control those around them. They avoid bullying and acknowledge that no means no.

 

4. They compromise and don’t expect something for nothing.

Small sacrifices show that the individual recognizes that trust is a two-way street. They’re willing to give a little to get something back later. And if they do ask for something, they’re sure to demonstrate the value of their request.

 

5. They’re relaxed (and so are you).

A person who is faking it and who is more likely to behave in shady ways usually will display some signs of anxiety, such as agitated body language. If the person seems at ease, they likely have nothing to hide and are being honest and open with you. You’ll likely feel calm, too, because you won’t be subconsciously picking up on and mirroring back negative cues.

 

6. They are respectful when it comes to time.

Trustworthy people do their best not to be late or cancel plans at the last minute because they know doing so inconveniences you and violates promises. They won’t try to rush or drag things out for their own benefit.

 

7. They show gratitude.

Trustworthy individuals are willing to admit they can’t do it all alone and value teamwork. They give credit where it’s due, even if it means they don’t advance as quickly or shine as much themselves.

 

8. They give up all the facts, even if it hurts.

Truth and transparency matters to trustworthy people. They won’t lie by omission or fudge data. They will give up even the information that could put their reputation at risk or create conflict, believing that those conflicts can be solved with good empathy and communication.

 

9. They confide in you.

Confiding in someone, exposing faults and all, involves a certain amount of vulnerability. So when someone confides in you, it demonstrates that the individual already trusts you and that they want you to be open with them, too.

 

10. They aren’t materialistic or desperate for money.

While there’s zero wrong with having nice things, trustworthy people don’t put stuff ahead of people. They’re willing to give up what they have (or could have) to help. Financial stability facilitates trust because it reduces the temptation to treat others poorly out of the need for self-preservation.

 

11. They’re right a lot.

Because trustworthy people value truth, they are willing to do their homework. They do the research that leads to verifiable conclusions, so they have a track record of having the right answer.

 

12. They skip the water cooler gossip.

Trustworthy individuals don’t like to make assumptions about anything or anybody. They prefer to get information from the source and to let the source speak for themselves. They avoid rumors because they know that rumors usually include negativity that tears people down instead of building them up. When they do talk, their language is empowering and respectful.

 

13. They’re learners.

Individuals who are worth your trust know they don’t have all the answers. They look for ways to learn and improve themselves constantly, and through that process, they’re willing to share the resources and facts they find.

 

14. You know who they’re connected to, and they try to connect you.

Both these elements show that the other person sees you as important. They want you to be part of their regular social group and meet the people you need to succeed. Others can affirm or contradict what you know about the individual, too. Subsequently, the more people the individual introduces you to, the more likely it is that they’re not hiding who they are.

 

15. They’re there for you and others.

Trustworthy people will listen to and support you even when they don’t need something from you. They do their best to be available to help, whatever you might be going through.

Source: INC,

Privacy watchdog calls for stronger laws to protect Canadians’ digital privacy

By Teresa Wright

THE CANADIAN PRESS

OTTAWA _ Canada’s privacy watchdog says he’s worried that privacy rights in Canada are being cast aside as both public and private entities rush to mine digital data from citizens and customers.

“We have reached a critical tipping point upon which privacy rights and democratic values are at stake,” privacy commissioner Daniel Therrien said in a letter to Innovation Minister Navdeep Bains on Wednesday.

Therrien wrote that government has been slow to put a legal framework in place to ensure Canadians maintain trust in the digital economy and he’s increasingly troubled by it. The government must take stronger actions to protect Canadians’ digital privacy in the face of the lightning-fast evolution of ways to collect deeply private information, he says.

“Recent events have shed light on how personal information can be manipulated and used in unintended, even nefarious ways,” the letter says.

Therrien pointed to technology executives, such as Apple’s Tim Cook, who have recently warned about data extraction being used in ways that could breach the public trust. Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg also recently admitted his company committed a “serious breach” in the Cambridge Analytica data controversy, which involved the alleged unauthorized use of some 87 million Facebook profiles globally including those of more than 600,000 Canadians.

Both companies have expressed support for new laws to protect and regulate digital information.

“You know the ground has shifted and that we have reached a crisis point when the tech giants have become outspoken supporters of serious regulation,” Therrien wrote.  “Now is the time to ensure we adopt the best approach for Canadians.”

He raised a concern over a question posed to Canadians by Bains’ department as part of a national public consultation launched this summer on data. It asks how government should try to strike protect Canadians’ digital privacy  “while not impeding innovation.”

Therrien wrote that he is  “wary of this discourse” as it suggests that privacy and innovation are at odds.

“At a time when new and intrusive targeting techniques are already influencing democratic processes and data analytics, automated decision-making technologies and artificial intelligence are raising important ethical questions that have yet to be answered, Canadians need stronger privacy laws, not more permissive ones.”

Therrien is urging the Liberals to create a new law to protect the private data of Canadians and to give his office greater powers of investigation and enforcement.

He also says it is  “absolutely imperative” for privacy laws to apply to Canadian political parties.

“Authenticity requires a certain measure of vulnerability, transparency, and integrity.”
–Janet Louise Stephenson

Read more
5 Tips for Managing Conflict in the Workplace

5 Tips for Managing Conflict in the Workplace

In an Accountemps survey, CFOs said they spend six hours a week, on average, managing conflicting parties on their staff. Some of the executives (17 percent) say they spend a quarter to more than half of their precious time dealing with conflict in the workplace.

Sound familiar? Just think what you could do with that six hours a week if you didn’t have to manage all those disagreements that erode into discord. Follow these five ways to encourage your workers to get along with others in the office:

1. Promote the flow of communication

Putting your head in the sand really doesn’t help when there’s conflict in the workplace. Problems rarely resolve themselves on their own and can even become worse if they’re not addressed. So be proactive.

Encourage those on your team who are having difficulty with a coworker to get their disagreements out in the open while they’re still small. Here are some hints you can offer them:

  • Ask your coworker with whom you’re not seeing eye to eye to name a time when it would be convenient for the two of you to meet, in a place where you won’t be interrupted.
  • After laying out your point of view on the issue, listen carefully to what the other person has to say, show empathy, avoid interrupting, and ask questions to clarify what was said.
  • Identify points of agreement and disagreement, and ask if your coworker agrees with your assessment.
  • Express your desire to work out a solution and discuss ways to resolve your conflict and improve your relationship.

2. Practice what you preach  

Managers, of course, need to lead the way with communication on the job. Here are some suggestions executives share to help you prevent conflicts while building rapport with your teams and colleagues:

  • Don’t take yourself too seriously.
  • Take an interest without participating in office politics.
  • Nip rumors in the bud by offering accurate and up-to-date clarifications.
  • Project an image of professionalism and good etiquette.
  • Respect unique points of view, and don’t criticize others publicly.
  • Check in regularly, and show how you value other people’s input.
  • Be honest, reliable and direct with your communication style.
  • Build your relationships by inviting others to coffee or lunch outside of the office.

3. Let your team know you can help 

A critical component of leadership is developing a sense of what’s important for you to do in times of stress.

First of all, tell your employees that if they find themselves in over their head, or if they’ve tried to resolve a conflict and the negative behavior continues to impede their work, they can use you as a resource. As a higher-up in your organization, you can provide recommendations and bring in another manager or someone from human resources for mediation.

Some suggestions for helping people work together:

  • Work to use your best listening skills so you can readily identify their concerns and the root cause of the problem,
  • Encourage the two sides to put aside their differences and find common ground — such as the desire to help the company to succeed.
  • Make it clear that their cooperation is required, and then continue to monitor the situation so the issue doesn’t fester and become worse.

When people believe their voices will be heard, they are more likely to perform at their best. Communication goes both ways, so inspire a relationship where they give you timely status reports and feedback about difficulties or challenges.

4. View everything as a learning opportunity

Perhaps, conflict in the workplace could be seen in a positive light. For all the grief disagreements can cause, there’s an upside when your workers can learn from them. Differing opinions can stimulate innovation and give added impetus for team building.

Helping to resolve disputes can put those you manage in a better position to assume leadership roles in your company. You can tell a temporary worker who wants to move into a full-time role that tact and diplomacy in dealing with conflict in the workplace can make a good impression on management. Or let an employee know that effectively working well with others can help with career advancement.

5. Criticize gently and praise achievement 

In a perfect world, everyone on your staff would be flawless at their jobs. But the reality is that they will make mistakes, get into arguments, experience personnel problems, miss deadlines. When you need to call attention to shortcomings, make it your goal to preserve each individual’s dignity. Meet in private and allow them to explain the problem and what might have led to it. Rather than assigning blame, reframe a mistake or failure as a lesson, and focus on what might be done differently in the future.

All professionals appreciate recognition, particularly when they’ve put in extra time or effort. So make a goal to celebrate resolution when your team achieves it. Even if they’ve made just small steps, congratulate them on the progress. They’re not robots, after all!

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