Understanding How We Relate to the World – Utilitarian/Utility

Understanding How We Relate to the World – Utilitarian/Utility

Let’s learn about the second value/motivation.

Do you have people on your team who can’t seem to get along? And do some struggle to communicate with others, seeming to “live in parallel universes”?
If so, identifying their personality types and acknowledging the differences between one-another may help your team members work together more harmoniously.
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READ MORE HERE: https://bit.ly/3vVHjBG
ILScorp

Cyber Security Awareness is well under way as we move through October

Source: https://securesense.ca/

Ahh, October. The time of the year when the air gets crisp, the leaves begin to change and Cyber Security Awareness begins! We may be biased, but we think October is the best month of the year.

We live in a world that is continuously more connected than ever before. The Internet touches almost every aspect of one’s daily life, whether realized or not. Cyber Security Awareness Month (CSAM) is designed to engage and educate the public and private sector through online events and initiatives to raise awareness about the importance of cybersecurity, provide them with tools and resources needed to stay safe online and increase the resiliency of the Nation in the event of a cyber incident.

The Government of Canada has already provided some great tools to help jump start your online security. We specifically like this infographic on 5 ways to run a #CyberSafeBusiness.

Happy Cyber Security Awareness Month!

 

OLHI Helps When Consumers Have Insurance Disputes

OLHI CEO, GLENN O’FARRELL TALKS LIFE, HEALTH, DISABILITY AND TRAVEL INSURANCE TRENDS

VANCOUVER, BCSept. 30, 2020 /CNW/ – In the midst of a pandemic, only one national, impartial and independent service offers Canadians across the country free help with life and health insurance complaints. The OmbudService for Life & Health Insurance (OLHI) is here to help.

Reports from across the insurance industry indicate there has been an increased demand for life insurance since the pandemic hit. With the near decimation of the travel industry, OLHI has seen double the typical number of travel insurance complaints across Canada. Disability claims remain consistently high at OLHI as the pressures of modern life can lead to disability claims due to mental health issues.

Glenn O’Farrell, former President of the Canadian Association of Broadcasters and former Senior Vice President of CanWest Global, will provide an overview of the vital public service OLHI provides to Canadians. O’Farrell will share case studies from consumers across Canada that will demonstrate how OLHI’s relationship with member insurance companies leads to the fair, equitable resolution of insurance complaints for Canadians.

Our unique role helps build confidence in the life and health insurance sector for Canadian consumers.

O’Farrell is scheduling phone interviews with talk radio stations across Canada in October and November.

ABOUT OLHI:

OLHI is Canada’s insurance complaint resolution service. The OLHI complaint resolution process provides an impartial review of your dispute, determines the merit of your complaint, and works with your insurance company to reach a fair and equitable resolution.

SOURCE OmbudService for Life & Health Insurance

For further information: For more information or the schedule an interview with Glenn O’Farrell, please email kafraser@olhi.ca or call 888-295-8112 x2251

BC Issues New Orders And Guidance To Employers For Phase 2 Of Its Restart Plan

The excerpted article was written
McCarthy Tétrault LLP

As BC begins Phase 2 of its Restart Plan, the Provincial Health Officer and WorkSafeBC (“WSBC”) have published the following orders, guidance and resources relevant to employers.

Orders by the Provincial Health Officer

On May 14, 2020, Dr. Henry issued an order cancelling her earlier April 16, 2020 order that operators close all personal service establishments and stop providing personal services in any location. Personal service establishments may open effective May 19, 2020.

On May 14, 2020, Dr. Henry enacted an order regarding workplace safety plans (the “COVID-19  Safety  Plans“). Under the order, an employer must post a copy of its COVID-19 Safety Plan on its website, if it has one, and at all of its workplaces so that it may be reviewed by workers, individuals who attend the workplace and members of the public. On request, an employer must also provide a copy of its COVID-19 Safety Plan to a health officer or a WSBC officer.

On May 15, 2020, Dr. Henry issued an order allowing restaurants and bars to open subject to conditions, including implementing physical distancing measures. Patrons must be able to maintain a distance of two metres from staff as well as one another, unless they are in the same party. Further, establishments cannot exceed 50 percent of their usual capacity of patrons present at one time, and they cannot hold events that include more than 50 people. If practicable, establishments must retain contact information for one member of every party of patrons for thirty days in the event that the medical health officer needs it for contact tracing. Finally, nightclubs must remain closed. The order came into effect on May 19, 2020.

The Provincial Health Officer may take enforcement action against any party that violates these orders under Part 4, Division 6 of the Public Health Act.

Recent Guidance

The BC Ministry of Health and the BC Centre for Disease Control recently published guidance for employers and workers in various sectors, including natural resources, farming and hotels.

The guidance for natural resource sector work camps includes conducting a COVID-19 workplace risk assessment for field operations, worker education, increased hygiene and cleaning practices, physical distancing, transportation for workers, guidance for workers while working, guidance for workers during breaks or while in communal spaces, guidance for situations where maintaining physical distance of two metres is difficult, guidance on handling tools and equipment, guidance on COVID-19 and worker accommodation, information regarding First Nations and First Nations Health Centres, physical distancing and local communities, information about face masks, and what employers must do to monitor worker health.

The guidance for farms and farm workers includes conducting a COVID-19 workplace risk assessment for the farm operation, worker education, guidance for training workers and employers on hygiene, guidance for increased hygiene, guidance for increased cleaning, physical distancing, transportation for workers, guidance for workers while working, guidance for workers during breaks or while in communal spaces, guidance for situations where maintaining physical distance of two metres is difficult, guidance on handling tools and equipment, guidance on COVID-19 hygiene and worker accommodation, information regarding First Nations and First Nations Health Centres, physical distancing and local communities, information about face masks, and what employers must do to monitor worker health. The guidance acknowledges that physical distancing between farm workers may be difficult in certain situations. Where workers are required to work together in close proximity to complete tasks, employers should form work pods (of six or fewer workers, if possible) to limit close contact within a small group. Similarly, where workers are required to travel together in vehicles to the work site, workers must travel in designated vehicles with their work pod and frequently clean and disinfect vehicles.

Guidance for the hotel sector covers general cleaning, housekeeping and laundry, waste management, food and beverage services, spas and salons, pools, fitness centres and playgrounds, staff health, and communication, signage and posters.

WSBC Guidance and Resources

WSBC has recently issued guidance relevant to Phase 2, including about COVID-19 Safety Plans, controlling exposure of the virus to workers, and new communication and training requirements.

COVID-19 Safety Plans

Employers must involve frontline workers, joint health and safety committees and supervisors when creating protocols for their workplace. WSBC has published a six-step process to help employers create their COVID-19 Safety Plan. The WSBC template is a fillable PDF that employers can use to develop their policies, guidelines and procedures. Employers are not required to have a formal plan in place prior to beginning operations, but are expected to develop their COVID-19 Safety Plan while taking steps to protect their workers’ safety. WSBC will consider enforcement measures if employers fail to take measures to protect workers from COVID-19.

Controlling Exposure

Employers should develop policies on who can be at the workplace, including policies on sick workers and recent travel. Employers do not have to implement health monitoring, such as temperatures checks or medical questionnaires, and should be aware of privacy issues if they choose to collect potentially sensitive medical information. WSBC notes that wearing masks is not mandatory for workers outside healthcare workplaces, and that masks and other personal protective equipment (“PPE”) should not be used as the only control measure. Instead, employers should offer the following types of protection, listed in order of greatest efficacy: i) eliminate risks (i.e. by limiting the number of workers at any one time, and enforce physical distancing), ii) implement engineering controls (i.e. installing barriers such as Plexiglas to separate people), iii) establish administrative controls (i.e. cleaning protocols) and iv) supply PPE such as non-medical masks.

Communication and Training

Employers should provide information to workers describing how they are managing COVID-19, including COVID-19 symptoms and a reminder not to go to work if workers have them, occupancy limits in common areas and other physical distancing measures, how specific tasks have been changed to prevent the potential spread of the virus, and instructions about hygiene. Employers are also responsible for training workers in tasks that they have changed as part of their COVID-19 Safety Plan, such as limits on the number of people in certain areas of the workplace and cleaning expectations for common areas and equipment. Where workplaces interface with customers, employers should consider adding signage, floor markings and other directions to ensure customers are maintaining physical distance from workers.

Source: Mondaq

5 Ways to Be a Better Virtual Listener!

5 Ways to Be a Better Virtual Listener!

Becoming an Active Listener

There are five key active listening techniques you can use to help you become a more effective listener:

1. Pay Attention

Give the speaker your undivided attention, and acknowledge the message. Recognize that non-verbal communication also “speaks” loudly.

  • Look at the speaker directly.
  • Put aside distracting thoughts.
  • Don’t mentally prepare a rebuttal!
  • Avoid being distracted by environmental factors. For example, side conversations.
  • “Listen” to the speaker’s body language.

2. Show That You’re Listening

Use your own body language and gestures to show that you are engaged.

  • Nod occasionally.
  • Smile and use other facial expressions.
  • Make sure that your posture is open and interested.
  • Encourage the speaker to continue with small verbal comments like yes, and “uh huh.”

3. Provide Feedback

Our personal filters, assumptions, judgments, and beliefs can distort what we hear. As a listener, your role is to understand what is being said. This may require you to reflect on what is being said and to ask questions.

  • Reflect on what has been said by paraphrasing. “What I’m hearing is… ,” and “Sounds like you are saying… ,” are great ways to reflect back.
  • Ask questions to clarify certain points. “What do you mean when you say… .” “Is this what you mean?”
  • Summarize the speaker’s comments periodically.

Tip:

If you find yourself responding emotionally to what someone said, say so. And ask for more information: “I may not be understanding you correctly, and I find myself taking what you said personally. What I thought you just said is XXX. Is that what you meant?”

4. Defer Judgment

Interrupting is a waste of time. It frustrates the speaker and limits full understanding of the message.

  • Allow the speaker to finish each point before asking questions.
  • Don’t interrupt with counter arguments.

5. Respond Appropriately

Active listening is designed to encourage respect and understanding. You are gaining information and perspective. You add nothing by attacking the speaker or otherwise putting her down.

  • Be candid, open and honest in your response.
  • Assert your opinions respectfully.
  • Treat the other person in a way that you think she would want to be treated.

 

Source: Mindtools.com

COVID-19: Here’s four things you should avoid doing while working from home

COVID-19: Here’s four things you should avoid doing while working from home

Excerpt By  | Global News

1) Don’t sweat the small stuff

Making light of things like technical difficulties, dogs barking or kids screaming can help to minimize the stress of having to work in less than ideal conditions, Hambley advised.

She suggests being transparent with people at the beginning of calls or video chats to let them know what your surroundings are like, which she says can help to alleviate undue anxiety.

“We all have things going on at home,” Hambley explained. “Some us have a spouse or a partner, some of us have children, pets – and it’s better to be up front about that and to share with others that our work conditions may not be perfect — and to make light of them.”

2) Don’t act like you’re working from home

Are you reading this while wearing pajamas or sweatpants? If so, you’re probably not alone. However, Hambley suggests trying the best you can to recreate the office environment — even down to the clothes that you wear.

“It helps to get in the right mindset if you dress the part,” Hambley said. “Don’t just wear PJs all day.”

She suggests this can help get people in the mindset of doing work and can also make it easier for them to transition back to “home” life at the end of the day.

She also recommends against taking video calls from bed or conference calls from the washroom.

3) Don’t go silent

Keeping the lines of communication open with colleagues can help to maintain productivity, so Hambley advises making an effort to check in with people and provide regular updates.

“If I’m going on a break I want people to know that maybe I won’t be available for maybe the next hour,” she said. “Keeping each other in the loop with what’s going on really helps.

“It’s better to have more communication right now than less,” she added.

4) Don’t work with bad posture

While it may seem nice to work on your laptop from the comfort of your bed, Hambley warns this can often bring with it some aches and pains.

“It’s easy to just get on the couch and bring your laptop there, or sit at the awkward dining room table … But it can really damage our bodies,” she warned.

Instead, Hambley suggests doing your best to set up an ergonomic workstation.

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