Workplace Bullying Courses

Workplace Bullying Courses

Are you compliant with the anti-bullying laws?

Ontario, Manitoba, Québec and Saskatchewan have already introduced legislation against bullying and B.C. recently enacted Bill 14 [Workers Compensation Amendment Act] to address the effects of bullying at work.

Become compliant with existing laws. Complete ILScorp’s “Understanding Workplace Bullying & Tools for Safeguarding an Organization from Bullying Behaviour” courses.

With these anti-bullying courses you will:

  • determine whether a problem exists in a workplace
  • learn how to prevent incidents
  • gain tools for safeguarding your organization from bullying behaviour
  • develop a workplace bullying prevention program

This course is included free of charge as part of your ILS General CE Course Subscription. This course is General and Adjuster CE accredited, however ILScorp recommends that all employees receive this training for law compliance.

Become an ILScorp group member

Get Instant Access | $85 (Fast, easy, done)

Employer Version Also Available

This course is included free of charge as part of your group membership.

If you are not a group member you can purchase the Employer Version of the course below. This course is General and Adjuster CE accredited, however ILScorp recommends that all employees receive this trainingfor law compliance.

Become an ILScorp group member

Get Instant Access to Employer Course $85

Are you compliant with the anti-bullying laws?

Are you compliant with the anti-bullying laws?

Ontario, Manitoba, Québec and Saskatchewan have already introduced legislation against bullying and B.C. recently enacted Bill 14 [Workers Compensation Amendment Act] to address the effects of bullying at work.

Become compliant with existing laws—complete ILScorp’s “Understanding Workplace Bullying & Tools for Safeguarding an Organization from Bullying Behaviour” courses.

With these anti-bullying courses you will:

  • determine whether a problem exists in a workplace
  • learn how to prevent incidents
  • gain tools for safeguarding your organization from bullying behaviour
  • develop a workplace bullying prevention program

This course is included free of charge as part of your ILS General CE Course Subscription. This course is General and Adjuster CE accredited. However, ILScorp recommends that all employees receive this training for law compliance.

Read More Here: 

Are you compliant with the anti-bullying laws?

7 Statistics on Workplace Harassment

Harassment in the workplace includes any objectionable behaviour that demeans, belittles, humiliates or embarrasses an employee. It also includes intimidation and threats. Ontario, Manitoba, Québec and Saskatchewan have already introduced legislation against bullying and B.C. recently enacted Bill 14 [Workers Compensation Amendment Act] to address the effects of bullying at work.

Here are seven statistics related to workplace harassment/bullying from safetystats.com:

  • Three tactics used in workplace bullying are: withholding information from a co-worker; excluding certain employees from meetings and threatening or intimidating co-workers.
  • 10% of Canadian workers ages 18 through 24 reported being victims of sexual harassment in the workplace at some point within the previous year. (Canadian Labour Congress)
  • 7% of male workers in the US reported being sexually harassed at work. (2008 telephone poll by Louis Harris and Associates)
  • 96% percent of people have experienced incivility (disrespectful behaviour) in the workplace. (The Cost of Bad Behavior, Christine Pearson and Christine Porath)
  • 94% of workers who are treated uncivilly say they have attempted to get even with their tormentors. (Christine Pearson and Christine Porath)
  • Four examples of harassment in the workplace are: serious or repeated rude, degrading or offensive remarks; displaying or sending sexist, racist or other offensive pictures, posters or emails; sexual harassment, such as unwelcome social invitations with sexual overtones or flirting; and threats, intimidation or retaliation.
  • About 60 % of workplace bullies are men, who tend to bully male and female employees equally. (New York Times)

Make your work place a better, safer place to be, and be compliant with existing bullying legislation, with the help of anti-bullying courses (for employees and employers) and office etiquette courses from ILScorp.

N.S. sends teen suicide expert to Cape Breton, promises new cyberbulling law

By Brett Bundale

THE CANADIAN PRESS

HALIFAX _ As a Cape Breton school board grapples with multiple teen suicides, the Nova Scotia government is sending a youth mental health expert to the grief-stricken community and promising new anti-cyberbullying legislation this fall.

Dr. Stan Kutcher, a Dalhousie University psychiatry professor, will travel to Cape Breton Monday to talk to families, schools, and the community about mental health concerns and what supports they need.

He is expected to report back to the province in the coming weeks.

The parents of a 13-year-old girl who took her own life on Father’s Day said bullying led to her death, and more needs to be done to protect other young people. They said their daughter, Madison Wilson, was subject to verbal abuse at school and through social media.

Premier Stephen McNeil said the province needs to have a broader conversation about bullying, especially online attacks.

“I can’t imagine how some of these young kids who are exposed to that are feeling,” he said Thursday. “We need to have a public conversation about what’s happening online. Our children can’t get away from it.”

McNeil said he hopes the province will engage the public in a broader conversation when it rolls out its updated anti-cyberbullying legislation.

Nova Scotia’s Cyber-Safety Act, the first law of its kind in Canada designed to protect victims of online harassment, was struck down in late 2015 after the province’s top court ruled that it infringed on Charter rights.

The law was passed in response to the death of Rehtaeh Parsons, a 17-year-old girl who was bullied and died after a suicide attempt.

Justice Minister Mark Furey said Thursday the recent suicides in Cape Breton, with at least one tied to cyberbullying, underscore the importance of the new legislation.

“We’re positioned now to introduce legislation this fall,” he said.

Furey said he hopes Kutcher, an expert on adolescent mental health, will be able to inform the province on what steps can be taken to support the community.

“Dr. Kutcher is a recognized mental health expert so his presence and participation in the discussion in Cape Breton will help the families, the school and the community deal with these tragic circumstances,” he said.

Darren Googoo, chairman of the Cape Breton Victoria Regional School Board, said this week the board is drafting a letter to the provincial Education Department with the idea of starting a dialogue on the issue.

“Our students are dealing with the trauma associated with the loss of a schoolmate and, going into the summer months, we want to make sure that we have a more co-ordinated approach with our provincial partners in health, in terms of providing services,” Googoo said.

Education Minister Zach Churchill said the province needs to “work together” to better understand the factors that contribute to teen suicides.

“We do have a collective responsibility to better understand these things, to learn from them and do our very best to improve the supports available,” he said. “We need to have an honest, open and frank conversation.”

However, it’s unclear whether additional resources, such as guidance counsellors or psychologists, will be made available.

In fact, Health Minister Randy Delorey said the province put additional resources in place for schools but it’s up to the board to decide “where exactly the resources are being allocated.”

He said questions about “how they’re choosing to spend their resources” are better directed to the school board.

However, he did admit that mental health is an area of priority for the province that requires more attention.

Are you compliant with the anti-bullying laws?

#BullyingAwarenessWeek: Are you compliant with the anti-bullying laws?

Ontario, Manitoba, Québec and Saskatchewan have already introduced legislation against bullying and B.C. recently enacted Bill 14 [Workers Compensation Amendment Act] to address the effects of bullying at work.

Become compliant with existing laws. Complete ILScorp’s “Understanding Workplace Bullying & Tools for Safeguarding an Organization from Bullying Behaviour” courses.

With these anti-bullying courses you will:

  • determine whether a problem exists in a workplace
  • learn how to prevent incidents
  • gain tools for safeguarding your organization from bullying behaviour
  • develop a workplace bullying prevention program

This course is included free of charge as part of your ILS General CE Course Subscription. This course is General and Adjuster CE accredited. However, ILScorp recommends that all employees receive this training for law compliance.

Read More Here: 

Insurance company bringing cyberbullying coverage to Canada for first time

Insurance company bringing cyberbullying coverage to Canada for first time

By  | Gobal News

A first-of-its-kind of insurance policy is supporting Canadians who have been victims of cyberbullying.

The policy could help students such as Kestrel McNeill, who said that for the majority of her Grade 12 year she felt alone.

“A group of my – used to be my very close friends – decided they didn’t like me anymore for whatever reason,” McNeill said.

“I [was] a kid who loved going to school, loved my sports … but by the end of the year I barely made it in because I hated being there.”

McNeill said she was bullied by students at her high school, and in May of last year she attempted suicide.

“I was extremely isolated,” she said, adding that her parents quickly put her into weekly private counselling in an attempt to save their daughter.

Dawn Friest, McNeill’s mother, knew opting for free counselling would mean placing her on a six-month waiting list.

“We were very fortunate to be in a financial situation where we had the means to pay for private treatment for her,” said Friest.

“It wasn’t an option for us to wait because she was sinking and we could see her sinking.”

Kestrel’s family spent over $1,000 for the one-on-one sessions, but now a new type of insurance is offering families coverage related to cyberbullying expenses.

Home insurance clients of Chubb Insurance can add the Masterpiece Family Protection Coverage policy to their existing plan, which now includes cyberbullying coverage for the first time in Canada.

“Unfortunately we have all heard of instances where people have been impacted by others misusing technology to cause harm and loss and it really is an unfortunate thing,” said Senior Vice President Paul Johnstone.

“[This plan] will help Chubb respond to any loss and or harm that may happen as a result of these instances.”

The policy covers expenses victims or family members might incur because of online harassment.

Those include expenses such as psychologists, lost wages due to wrongful termination and temporary relocation. Consultations from digital forensic professionals and reputation management firms are also included, which could help assess and amend the negative footprint that cyberbullying can leave online.

The policy does not cover legal fees.

“If there is medical expenses or psychiatric support, if there is a need for rest and recuperation, that’s a coverage that’s provided,” Johnstone said.

“If an insured had to temporarily relocate that would be covered. So our focus is on the insured and trying to find a way to take care of them in these unfortunate instances.”

The policy has a $110 premium and also includes insurance for carjacking, hijacking, child abduction, stalking threats and home invasion coverage.

The U.S. and UK have similar plans that Johnstone said have been extremely successful.

“There is a tremendous amount of interest and that speaks to our world, today,” he said. “Technology is a wonderful and powerful thing, but can also be a gateway to risk.”

Criminal lawyer Joseph Neuberger said while there are great features included in the policy, he doesn’t believe cyberbullying coverage will proliferate within the insurance industry.

“There are a lot of very constructive ways to deal with online types of harassments,” Neuberger said.

The maximum for the cyberbully coverage is $60,000 per incident but Neuberger added victims are likely to yield more compensation if they choose to pursue legal action.

“Let’s say you lose a job as a result of things being posted online, well a wrongful dismissal could result in much more significant damages than what you can claim under this policy,” Neuberger said.

“And if you are going after an individual who has some assets and your damages might be in far more excess of this.”

Carol Todd’s daughter Amanda took her own life in 2012 after dealing with cyberbullying.

Todd said that while the policy looks good on paper, she still has her doubts.

“I would like to see what the process was going to be like. If there has been families who have used this, what was their wait time, what was their dealings with the insurance company, was it agreeable or would it be a possible re-victimization?” Todd said.

But McNeill and her family believe the coverage would be a useful tool for parents.

“Most parents just don’t have the tools or the means to deal with this stuff when it happens, you throw your hands up in the air and you don’t know where to turn,” Friest said.

“If these types of tools are available through an insurance policy, I think families might be more able to address the issues.”

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