Holiday CounterAttack roadchecks start this weekend

Holiday CounterAttack roadchecks start this weekend

This year’s holiday CounterAttack campaign is kicking off this weekend with police roadchecks set up across the province. ICBC and police are urging drivers to plan ahead and make smart decisions to get home safely this holiday season.

Although COVID-19 has changed many things, it hasn’t changed the law – if you plan to drink, don’t drive.

“We know celebrations will look different this holiday season,” said Lindsay Matthews, ICBC’s vice-president of public affairs and driver licensing. “If you’ve been drinking at home, please stay home and don’t drive. When you drink and drive, you not only risk your life but those of others on the road. We all need to do our part to prevent crashes and save lives. If you plan to drink, plan ahead.”

Impaired driving remains a leading cause of fatal car crashes, with an average of 67 lives lost every year in B.C. More than half of impaired-related crashes (56 per cent) occur on the weekend (Friday to Sunday).

“We fully support our road safety partners and the CounterAttack campaign and will be out in force over the holiday season to deter impaired driving,” said Superintendent Holly Turton, vice-chair of the B.C. Association of Chiefs of Police Traffic Safety Committee. “Police will utilize mandatory alcohol screening, Standardized Field Sobriety Testing and Drug Recognition Experts to identify and remove alcohol and drug affected drivers from our roads to make BC’s roads some of the safest in the world.”

For more than 40 years, ICBC has implemented impaired driving education campaigns and funded CounterAttack enhanced police enforcement.

ICBC leads two impaired driving education campaigns every year. Learn more facts and tips in ICBC’s infographic.​

Statistics:*

  • On average, 17 people are killed in crashes involving impaired driving in the Lower Mainland every year.

  • On average, 11 people are killed in crashes involving impaired driving on Vancouver Island every year.

  • On average, 23 people are killed in crashes involving impaired driving in the Southern Interior every year.

  • On average, 17 people are killed in crashes involving impaired driving in North Central B.C. every year.

Editor’s notes:

  • Several police detachments throughout B.C. will invite media to attend CounterAttack roadchecks in their communities during a one-day blitz on December 5.

  • B-roll footage of a CounterAttack roadcheck is available for download.

Notes about the data:

*Fatal victim counts from police data based on five-year average from 2015 to 2019. Impaired is defined to include alcohol, illicit drugs and medicines.

More than ever before, Canadians are facing financial risk

As Canada deals with a global pandemic and rising household debt, Goose Insurance warns that most Canadians can’t afford further financial setbacks caused by a life-threatening illness.

VANCOUVER, BCNov. 9, 2020 /CNW/ – Goose Insurance, a new player in the life and health insurance market warns Canadians could be out-of-pocket tens of thousands of dollars while undergoing treatment for any life-threatening illness.

Goose Insurance recently conducted a survey of over 1000 Canadians, yielding some eye-opening results. The company found that less than 5% of respondents have critical illness insurance or cancer insurance and majority of the people wrongly believe that Canada’s health care system covers all costs associated with cancer treatment or any other life-threatening illness. Overwhelmingly, women are under insured in Canada, with over 70% of the women that responded to the survey have never purchased life or critical illness insurance.

According to the Canadian Medical Association Journal, nearly half of Canadians will be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetime. In fact, the CMAJ estimates that 225,000 people will be diagnosed with, and 83,000 people will die from, cancer in 2020 alone.

While Canada’s health care system covers many costs associated with life-threatening medical treatments, many patients still face out-of-pocket expenses while undergoing treatment, including some drugs not covered, childcare, rent or mortgage, and other household bills and responsibilities.  This comes at a time when Canadians are dealing with COVID-19, a global pandemic; whilst battling an all-time high household debt ratio of 176.9% according to Statistics Canada.

So why aren’t Canadians buying life and health insurance? Of those surveyed by Goose, the two most common reasons were accessibility and affordability. Specifically amongst young Canadians aged 25 to 35, over 50% didn’t know where to buy it from and over 70% found it too complicated.

“Goose is tackling the accessibility and affordability of insurance, and addressing the underserved market,” says Dejan Mirkovic, President of Goose Insurance. “We’re offering reasonable coverage limits at affordable prices, and the ability to buy policies in minutes without medical exams or the need to speak to an agent; all on the Goose app.”

Goose Insurance together with Industrial Alliance Financial Group, one of Canada’s largest Insurers, has made insurance accessible and affordable for anyone under 69 with a smartphone. On the Goose mobile app, Canadians simply become eligible by answering a few medical questions and can get up to $50,000 of Life Insurance for as low as $5 a month. Monthly premiums are based on age, gender, and smoking status.

“For decades, Special Markets Solutions (a division of iA Financial Group) has promoted voluntary insurance programs using traditional methods. While these offerings provided valuable coverage, these methods were outdated and time consuming. We are very excited to be partnering with Goose Insurance in offering voluntary products on a revolutionary digital platform.  This will allow the user to have an easy to understand, seamless and instant application experience . The future is now,” said Ed Bender, National VP, Special Markets Solutions at iA Financial Group.

___________________

Established in 2018 and based in Vancouver, British Columbia, Goose Insurance Services takes the confusing parts out of buying insurance and makes it easier than ever to get the right coverage. And it all happens in seconds, from a single app. Goose currently serves British ColumbiaAlbertaSaskatchewanManitobaOntario, Québec, and Nova Scotia in Canada as well as WashingtonOregonIllinoisGeorgiaNew Jersey, and Texas in the US. For more information about Goose, or to download the app, visit www.gooseinsurance.com

SOURCE Goose Insurance Services Inc.

https://www.gooseinsurance.com/en/

Drive Safe. Drive Less. Save Money

Canada’s hospitality businesses face new threat amid coronavirus – rising insurance

 

Canadian hospitality businesses, already reeling from the downturn sparked by the coronavirus pandemic, are facing yet another existential threat as insurance companies spike premiums or exit the space, citing losses and the sector’s risks.

Even before COVID-19, insurers globally were scaling back from riskier businesses to improve performance. The pandemic’s profit hits have accelerated the trend and led underwriters to exit from, or raise premiums in, select categories.

Hospitality businesses, particularly those needing coverage for accidents caused by alcohol-impaired clients, were already seen as higher risk, said Karen Ritchie, vice president at Baird MacGregor Insurance Brokers and president of the Toronto Insurance Council. The coronavirus exacerbated that.

“It’s a perfect storm,” she said.

Many hospitality companies were already operating on razor-thin margins before pandemic-driven lockdowns. An inability to access affordable insurance could spell the end for them, given they are barely managing to hang on amid distancing restrictions.

While these businesses carry the same risks as elsewhere, the Canadian hospitality industry has faced a bigger hit due to a much smaller insurance market dominated by Lloyd’s syndicates, Ritchie said. Far more domestic insurers cover the space in countries like the United States, spreading out risk, she said.

Toronto’s top doctor recommends lower music, reduced capacity in bars and restaurants

Toronto’s top doctor recommends lower music, reduced capacity in bars and restaurants

Lloyd’s is a marketplace that comprises various specialist insurers, or syndicates, who write policies.

Lloyd’s business volumes fell 8.6 per cent in the first half of 2020, reflecting an intentional reduction by several syndicates exposed to poorly performing business segments, the group said in a statement.

The Lloyd’s market lost 438 million pounds ($569 million), versus a 2.3 billion pound profit a year earlier, primarily driven by coronavirus-driven losses.

‘I would close’

Erik Joyal, co-owner of Ascari Hospitality Group in Toronto, was told last month that his Hi-Lo Bar’s policy would not be renewed as his insurer, part of Lloyd’s, was moving away from restaurants and bars.

His broker found a policy through another insurer at more than three times his current C$9,000 annual premium, even though the restaurant had never filed a claim.

“I would close the business before I signed on to that,” said Joyal, who is continuing to search for an affordable policy.

Insurers, like other businesses, need profits, said Pete Karageorgos, director of consumer and industry relations at the Insurance Bureau of Canada.

And there is still capacity and affordable coverage available for businesses that can show measures to minimize risks, he added.

Arron Barberian said his Harry’s Steak House in Toronto was dropped by his insurance company, Groupone Insurance Services, although he paid premiums when the business was shut.

Groupone declined to comment.

Barberian found a policy through Intact Financial Corp , which insures his other Toronto restaurant, Barberian’s Steak House. While cheaper, it offers slim, possibly inadequate, coverage, he said.

Intact’s underwriting criteria for restaurants haven’t changed, and it continues to renew policies and write new ones, a spokeswoman said by email.

B.C. bar and restaurant owners say mandatory 10 p.m. shutdown rule is seriously hurting business

B.C. bar and restaurant owners say mandatory 10 p.m. shutdown rule is seriously hurting business

A Nova Scotia hotel owner, who said he was quoted a 50 per cent increase in premiums to renew his policy, also found more affordable coverage through Intact.

Even so, the owner, who declined to be identified as he is negotiating the return of some premiums paid during the shut-down, said he is bracing for thousands of dollars in additional expenses, as a change in insurers is accompanied by an inspection and, often, demands for changes.

His previous insurer, Wawanesa Insurance, attributed the premium increase to higher fire and storm-related losses even before the pandemic.

Despite limited ability to operate, “many bars and restaurants https://www.alignedinsurance.com/restaurant-insurance-overview still had contractual obligations and real risk that needed to be insured and insurance had to be maintained,” said Andrew Clark, chief executive of mortgage broker ALIGNED Insurance.

“The unfortunate reality is that the insurance companies aren’t willing to insure some businesses right now and they don’t really have many other options than to close,” Clark said.

Source: Global News

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