Nova Scotians not keen on tech that could save them money on car insurance

Nova Scotians not keen on tech that could save them money on car insurance

By David Burke, CBC News

Several insurance companies in Nova Scotia are offering a program that allows people to save up to 25 per cent on their car insurance, but few people are opting to take part, according to OTC insurance and the Insurance Bureau of Canada.

In order to apply for the discount, people have to volunteer to install what’s known as a telematics device in their car.

The small device is installed under a car’s steering wheel and records an individual’s driving habits for six months.

The device records things like driving distances, the time of day the car is driven, and sudden acceleration or braking, said Christine Gaudreau, the vice president of OTC insurance in Halifax.

At the end of the six months the device is turned over to the insurance company and it uses the data to determine if the user should get a discount on their insurance.

“We’ve been advertising quite heavily on the radio and seems like people are very leery about having this device in their vehicle for the insurance companies to look at,” said Gaudreau.

Depending on how well a person drives, the insurance company could give them up to a 25 per cent discount.

If a person drives badly, there’s no penalty and their rate will remain the same, said Gaudreau.

Despite all the advertising OTC has only had about 50 people sign up for the program.

“I think it’s probably more of a big brother situation, may be who knows?” said Gaudreau. “I’m not comfortable with it in my car.”

“But for some people that use their vehicle very little, it’s probably very beneficial to them.”

Telematics more popular in Ontario and Quebec

The Insurance Bureau of Canada is the national industry association representing Canada’s private, home, auto and business insurers.

It said Nova Scotia has been slow to adopt telematics compared with other parts of the country.

“Well there is a bit of a slow uptake from what we’re hearing so far in Nova Scotia. But that’s not abnormal for any new technology especially when it’s related to a product like auto insurance,” said Amanda Dean, vice president Atlantic with the Insurance Bureau of Canada.

Dean said she doesn’t have exact numbers breaking down how many people are using telematics across the country.

She said due to the privacy concerns involved with telematics, most companies have not released any figures detailing how many consumers are using the technology. But she said the insurance bureau is seeing definite trends.

“Well it’s existed in other parts of the country for some time and that was in response to consumer demand in those parts of the country. So there’s a bit more uptake let’s say in Quebec or Ontario for example,” said Dean.

She said on average insurance premiums are lower in Nova Scotia then they are in places like Ontario, and that can make people more willing to try telematics to get lower rates.

Privacy concerns

David Fraser is a privacy lawyer with McInnes Cooper in Halifax, he has mixed feelings about telematics.

“Once this information is generated, it exists and it can be used for other other purposes. It can be subpoenaed in connection for with a lawsuit, the police could get a search warrant and it just adds to the amount of digital debris that we leave behind in the run of the day,” said Fraser.

He also questions how accurate the information will be and how it will be interpreted.

But Fraser said the overall idea of charging people based on exactly on how they drive makes a lot of sense.

“If you are somebody who speeds regularly, who passes recklessly, who slams on the brakes or kind of spins his tires when he’s leaving as the light turns green, maybe that person should be recognized and have higher premiums,” said Fraser.

“But that’s part of a broader discussion we need to have.”

15 Car Insurance Myths Unveiled

15 Car Insurance Myths Unveiled

Source: www.auto123.com

For something as common as car insurance, there are a whole lot of myths about it. The trouble with car insurance myths is that they can end up influencing your decisions and costing you money. The following myths, compiled by Kanetix.ca, will help you sort what’s fact and what’s fiction in the world of car insurance.

   1. The colour of your car affects your car insurance rate.

Most people assume otherwise, but in truth it doesn’t matter if your car is blue, red, silver, white, or black. Your car insurance rate will not be impacted by the colour of your car.

   2. Rates are higher for two-door vehicles.

While a two-door may look sportier, it doesn’t mean it will cost more to insure. Insurers look at things like the car’s accident frequency, repair costs, theft frequency, vandalism and safety ratings—not the number of doors it has when determining the insurance rate.

   3. Rates are higher for new cars.

While there is a correlation between the value of a car and how much it costs to insure, a new car won’t always be more expensive to insure than a used one. New cars usually have more safety features and advanced anti-theft features, which can actually bring down rates.

   4. New cars are more attractive to car thieves.

Each year, the Insurance Bureau of Canada (IBC) tallies up the most stolen vehicles in Canada, and each year the list typically shows that older cars are stolen more often than new cars. In fact, the most recent list shows that the most stolen cars were made between 2001 and 2007.

   5. If you lend your car and the driver gets in an accident, it’s not your insurance—but theirs—that pays out any claims.

In most cases, when you lend your vehicle, you are essentially lending your insurance as well so be mindful of who you hand over your car keys to.

   6. Getting a parking ticket means your insurance rates will go up.

Parking tickets do not count against your insurance, but unpaid fines could affect your ability to renew your driver’s licence or even result in a licence suspension—which will then affect your rate.

   7. Getting a speeding ticket means your insurance rates will go up.

Your first minor speeding ticket (usually less than 50 km/h over the speed limit) may not affect your insurance rate; it will depend on your insurer. But, get two or three and you’ll be paying more for insurance. A major speeding ticket (50 km/h or more over the limit) will make your rates go up for sure.

   8. If your car is stolen, you’ll be covered.

This is true, but only if you have purchased comprehensive coverage, an optional coverage. Comprehensive coverage will pay for damages that are not caused by a collision; things like theft, vandalism, fire, hail and even some damages that involve wildlife.

   9. If you cause a collision, the damages to your car will be covered.

Damages to your car may be covered, but only if you’ve purchased collision coverage. Collision coverage, is an optional coverage (like comprehensive), and will provide coverage in the event you are responsible—wholly or partially—in a collision.

   10. The lower your deductible, the lower your premium.

False. A deductible is the portion of an insurance claim you agree to pay; your insurance company picks up the rest. If you’re looking to lower your premiums, you’ll actually have to increase your deductibles.

   11. Only bad drivers need to shop around for car insurance.

Too often, drivers think that only those with a less than perfect driving history have to shop around. This is simply not true. Rates vary considerably between insurance providers no matter what your driving record looks like. Everyone, good drivers and bad, should shop around to make sure they’re getting the best price for the coverage they need.

   12. Your rates will be similar to your neighbour’s rate.

False. Where you live is just one component that affects your rate; there are many others like your driving experience, insurance history, the number of drivers in your home, and the number and type of vehicles you drive.

   13. You’ll pay the same auto insurance rate if you move.

Where you live is one of the factors taken into consideration when determining your rate. When you move your premiums will likely change too; for some drivers it might mean paying less, for others, it may be more.

   14. Your loyalty discount is worth more than any savings switching insurers will net you.

Changing insurance companies would mean losing your loyalty discount, but that doesn’t mean you’re getting the best rate available. Shop around because sometimes the savings realized by switching providers outweighs any loyalty discounts you may have, if you have any at all.

   15. All car insurance companies charge about the same.

False. Rates can vary by hundreds or even thousands of dollars to insure the same car and driver for the exact same policy, depending on the company. So it pays to shop around.

 Car insurance fact: The best way to save is to shop around for a better deal.

A sure-fire way to lower your car insurance premium is to compare quotes, at minimum on an annual basis before your renew. Kanetix.ca shops the market for you to help you find a better car insurance rate. No one covers as much of the market as we do. This is why Kanetix.ca shoppers save an average of $750 on their car insurance premiums. Shop around for car insurance to make sure you are getting the coverage you need at the best available price.

No insurance until summer, so Uber says it will suspend Edmonton operations

EDMONTON — Uber officials say they are suspending operations in Edmonton for now after the Alberta government announced it will make insurance available to drivers, but likely not until the summer.

Ramit Kar, the general manager for the ride-booking company in Alberta, issued a news release Monday night announcing operations would cease as of Tuesday morning.

Kar described the suspension as temporary but did not say how long it would last.

On Monday, Transportation Minister Brian Mason said the insurance for Uber was approved but wouldn’t be ready until June or by July 1 at the latest.

He said the province needed to take the time to “do due diligence and ensure that there’s no loopholes.”

He said it was important that if a passenger were injured in an accident involving an Uber vehicle, the insurance company could not deny coverage.

Kar said the company would “respect” the province’s decision but added it “has cost thousands of Edmonton families a source of income by forcing Uber to suspend operations in the city.”

He added the suspension is “unfortunately depriving tens of thousands of local riders a safe, affordable and reliable transportation alternative.”

California-based Uber is an app-based business that allows people to request rides over their phones and sets them up with drivers in their personal vehicles. Getting an Uber ride is typically cheaper than taking a taxi.

Cities across the country have been debating how to handle Uber.

In January, Edmonton became the first jurisdiction to legalize the new industry, and a bylaw is to come into effect Tuesday, with conditions including provincially approved insurance, vehicle inspections and fees. Calgary city council also recently passed a bylaw which could start in April.

Kar released a statement Monday saying Edmonton’s mayor and city council could delay the bylaw until the insurance is available but Mayor Don Iveson said there would be no delay in the bylaw and Uber would have to shut down.

“If they operate without insurance, they’re going to be in a lot of trouble,” Iveson said.

Mason said it shouldn’t come as a surprise that the insurance is coming later.

“We’ve always been working along the basis that the insurance product wouldn’t be ready until June or July. I believe Uber and the city have been aware of that.”

In addition, the province is requiring ride-hailing drivers to get criminal record checks and have at least a Class 4 driver’s licence, which is a commercial licence.

Uber had fought the licence requirement, which is part of Calgary’s bylaw, and argued its drivers should just have a regular Class 5 licence. A Class 4 licence requires more training and knowledge in areas such as defensive driving, driver fatigue and dealing with disabled passengers, Mason said.

“Whether it’s full or part time, commercial drivers have a responsibility for their passengers which requires the appropriate level of skill and road knowledge,” he added.

“My top priority is to ensure that passengers as well as drivers are safe.”

Edmonton company TappCar, set to launch in the city in March, is hiring a mix of former Uber and taxi drivers and other professional drivers laid off from the oilpatch.

Spokesman Pascal Ryffel said the government regulations won’t delay the company. Its drivers will all have at least Class 4 licences and full commercial insurance similar to that for taxi drivers, he said.

“We always went under the assumption that these are the rules.”

— With files from CHED

canada-press

The Canadian Press

Toronto: Man held responsible after designated driver service totals his car

CTV Toronto

A Toronto-area man says he was held responsible by his insurance company after a designated driving service crashed his car in January.

Dylan Milosh decided to go out for drinks with his girlfriend in Whitby. Instead of calling a taxi, Milosh hired a designated driver to drive him and his car home.

But the designated driver drove Milosh’s car into the back of a parked RV.

“Long story short, about a kilometre after departing where we were going from, my car was written off,” he said.

Even though he wasn’t the one behind the wheel at the time, Milosh said the crash was considered an at-fault accident by his insurance company.

“My insurance goes up (and) it’s a claim on my driving record,” he said, adding that the designated driver company “wiped their hands clean” of the incident.

The service Milosh used was Durham-based People’s Choice Designated Drivers.

“We have a driver that made an honest mistake. No charges were laid and we paid the owner’s $500 insurance deductible,” a spokesperson from the company told CTV’s Pat Foran.

Services that drive people’s cars for them usually include in their contracts that they are not responsible for any damage to the vehicles.

The Insurance Bureau of Canada says the same rule applies whether you get a company or another individual to drive your car.

“If there’s a crash that the vehicle’s involved in while that person’s driving, it’s going on your record,” said Pete Karageorgos.

People’s Choice Designated Drivers said it offered to pay off the damage to Milosh’s car without going through the insurance company, but the vehicle had more than $5,000 is damage and had to be written off.

Milosh had to buy another car. He says he won’t be using a designated driver service again.

“As a professional driving service, you would really hope they have their own insurance,” he said. “Apparently not.”

Different companies may have different rules, so it’s always important to ask about how insurance works before letting someone else driving your vehicle.

Alberta government says insurance for ride booking companies coming by July

EDMONTON _ The Alberta government has approved insurance for ride-booking companies like Uber, but it’s not available yet.

Transportation Minister Brian Mason said Monday that the insurance likely won’t be ready until June, or by July 1 at the latest.

“What we’ve done is taken the time to do due diligence and ensure that there’s no loopholes,” Mason said.

“That in fact, if a passenger is injured in an accident involving an Uber vehicle, the insurance company is not going to be able to say, ‘you’re not covered.”’

California-based Uber is an app-based business that allows people to request rides over their phones and sets them up with drivers in their personal vehicles. Getting an Uber ride is typically cheaper than taking a taxi.

Cities across the country have been debating how to handle Uber.

In January, Edmonton became the first jurisdiction to legalize the new industry, and a bylaw is to come into effect Tuesday, with conditions including provincially approved insurance, vehicle inspections and fees. Calgary city council also recently passed a bylaw which could start in April.

Ramit Kar, general manager for Uber in Alberta, said at a rally of supporters on the weekend that the company would stop operating in Alberta unless the government quickly made insurance available.

Kar released a statement Monday saying Edmonton’s mayor and city council could delay the bylaw until the insurance is available “and support thousands of local families who rely on ride-sharing as a way to earn or travel affordably.”

Mayor Don Iveson said there would be no delay in the bylaw and Uber will have to shut down.

“If they operate without insurance, they’re going to be in a lot of trouble tomorrow,” Iveson said.

Mason said it shouldn’t come as a surprise that the insurance is coming later.

“We’ve always been working along the basis that the insurance product wouldn’t be ready until June or July. I believe Uber and the city have been aware of that.”

In addition, the province is requiring ride-hailing drivers to get criminal record checks and have at least a Class 4 driver’s licence, which is a commercial licence.

Uber had fought the licence requirement, which is part of Calgary’s bylaw, and argued its drivers should just have a regular Class 5 licence. A Class 4 licence requires more training and knowledge in areas such as defensive driving, driver fatigue and dealing with disabled passengers, Mason said.

“Whether it’s full or part time, commercial drivers have a responsibility for their passengers which requires the appropriate level of skill and road knowledge,” he added.

“My top priority is to ensure that passengers as well as drivers are safe.”

Edmonton company TappCar, set to launch in the city in March, is hiring a mix of former Uber and taxi drivers and other professional drivers laid off from the oilpatch.

Spokesman Pascal Ryffel said the government regulations won’t delay the company. Its drivers will all have at least Class 4 licences and full commercial insurance similar to that for taxi drivers, he said.

“We always went under the assumption that these are the rules.”

canada-press

 

Buffett says auto insurance rates are going up, distracted drivers a problem

By Josh Funk

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OMAHA, Neb. _ Billionaire Warren Buffett said the U.S. economy appears weaker than he thought it would be as recently as last fall, but that doesn’t change his optimistic long-term view of the country’s prospects.

Buffett appeared on CNBC Monday and addressed a variety of topics after releasing his annual letter to Berkshire Hathaway shareholders over the weekend. The more than 90 companies owned by Berkshire give Buffett a complex and detailed view of how the economy is affecting different U.S. sectors.

“Business is a little softer in many places than I anticipated four or five months ago. That doesn’t mean it’s in reverse,” said Buffett, who is Berkshire’s chairman and CEO.

The economy continues growing slowly, and Buffett is confident the U.S. economy will improve over time, but plunging oil prices have had a significant impact.

Thousands of jobs have been lost in the oil industry, the budgets and local economies of producing states have come under severe pressure and energy companies have had billions shaved from their market value. Yet Buffett said that the benefit for the vast majority of Americans trickles in slowly every time they fill up their gas tanks.

“The country will grow in value over time,” he said.

Over the past six months, Berkshire has built up a 14 per cent stake in oil refiner Phillips 66. Buffett said it’s wrong to think of that investment as a bet on oil prices because refiners, who are paying a lot less for the crude they turn into gasoline and other fuels, can turn a huge profit when oil prices fall.

But one of Berkshire Hathaway’s operations has been damaged by those plunging prices.

Because gas prices are so low, people are driving more, and the number of vehicle accidents spiked.

The National Safety Council recently estimated the number of traffic deaths in the United States rose 8 per cent from 2014 to 2015, the largest year-to-year percentage increase in a half-century.

Underwriting profits at auto insurer Geico, which is owned by the conglomerate, plunged from $1.16 billion in 2014, to just $460 million last year.

In addition to the millions of additional road miles that are being logged, Buffett said distracted drivers are as serious problem.

And that could offset some of the savings Americans are seeing at the gas pump.

Auto insurance rates, Buffett said, are going up this year.

Buffett said he can’t predict how the current era of low interest rates will affect the economy because it has never happened before, but they could distort prices and encourage more borrowing.

He said Berkshire has to keep billions of euros in banks in Europe, and the low rates could have a negative effect there.

“We would be better off if we had a big mattress in Europe that we could stick all the stuff in,” Buffett joked. “If I could just find a person who I trusted to sleep on the mattress, that’s what we would do.”

Buffett said he understands why regulators cut interest rates to help Europe recover, but there’s no way to know how that will affect business. He said Berkshire paid more for its recent $32.36 billion acquisition of aircraft parts maker Precision Castparts because rates are so low.

Buffett’s letter, which reviews the operations of the conglomerate over the previous year, is widely read. Berkshire posted a $24 billion profit last year, up from $20 billion in 2014.

canada-press

 

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