Police focus on impaired drivers for August Traffic Safety Spotlight

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​ICBC & police warn impaired drivers ahead of long weekend

​ICBC & police warn impaired drivers ahead of long weekend

This B.C. Day long weekend, our roads will be busy with some British Columbians choosing to travel throughout the province for a getaway and others visiting local parks and restaurants. No matter what your plans are, if you plan to drink, don’t drive.

Police will be setting up CounterAttack roadchecks across the province to get impaired drivers off our roads. If you’re caught driving impaired, you could end up paying in a number of lasting ways – from increased insurance premiums to fines, car impoundment or even jail time.

On average, four people are killed and 620 people injured in 2,200 crashes across the province over the B.C. long weekend.*

5 ways to stay safe on your road trip:

  1. If you’re away from home, you may not be familiar with all of the options available to get home safely after you’ve had a few drinks. Check your options such as taxis, ride sharing, transit or shuttle services before you head out and save the information into your cell phone so you can relax knowing you have a plan to get home safely.

  2. Most crashes on B.C. Day long weekend occur on Friday so plan to leave on Thursday or Saturday morning if possible to avoid traffic congestion and possible delays. You should also make sure you get a good night’s sleep to avoid getting fatigued behind the wheel. Plan your route on drivebc.ca and include rest breaks or switch drivers every two hours.

  3. Do a pre-trip check and check your engine oil, coolant levels and lights, and inspect your vehicle tires, including the spare, to make sure they’re in good condition and properly inflated. Make sure any camping or outdoor equipment is securely tied down to your vehicle before you take off.

  4. Summer means more motorcyclists on our roads so it’s vital to scan as you approach an intersection. Be ready to yield the right-of-way when turning left and keep in mind that it can be hard to tell how fast motorcyclists are travelling.

  5. Be patient with R.V. drivers if they’re travelling below the speed limit in mountainous areas as they’re likely going uphill as fast as they can. If you’re driving your RV this weekend, be courteous and pull over when it’s safe to do so to let others by. This is much safer than a driver making an unsafe pass out of frustration.

Regional statistics*:

  • Over the B.C. day long weekend, on average, 420 people are injured in 1,400 crashes in the Lower Mainland every year.

  • Over the B.C. Day long weekend, on average, 94 people are injured in 380 crashes in the Southern Interior every year.

  • Over the B.C. Day long weekend, on average, 26 people are injured in 130 crashes in North Central B.C. every year.

  • Over the B.C. Day long weekend, on average, 75 people are injured in 330 crashes on Vancouver Island every year.

* Five-year annual average. Crash and injury data is ICBC data (2015 to 2019). Fatality data is police data (2014 to 2018). B.C. Day long weekend is calculated from 18:00 the Friday prior to B.C. Day to midnight on B.C. Day.

Extensive new ICBC data available to public online

British Columbians can now access comprehensive new data, quickly and easily, as part of ICBC’s commitment to increase transparency, with extensive crash and vehicle population data available on icbc.com.

“Making sure the public is well-informed and supported is a priority,” said Nicolas Jimenez, ICBC’s president and CEO. “We’ll continue to expand the data available on icbc.com to better support customers, researchers, media and stakeholders.”

ICBC is sharing more data publicly in a customizable, convenient format that will make data available to the public in a timelier way. This initiative also supports the B.C. government’s Open Data initiative.

Customers can customize the new data sets or download the data in its entirety.

Vehicle population data includes various fields such as municipality, vehicle type or area based on the first three characters of a postal code. Crash data can be filtered to the details of an individual crash, including the street and crash configuration (for example, rear end, head on or side impact). As an example, users can filter crash data to municipality level by severity, street name and identify whether a pedestrian or cyclist was involved.

More data will be added throughout the year on topics including contraventions and driver licensing.

Quick Statistics, a collection of the most commonly requested statistics provided in a simple view, was previously published as PDFs and is now available in a downloadable, interactive format. Quick Statistics and crash maps have also been updated with 2019 data.

ICBC launches online booking system for in-office driver licensing appointments

ICBC launches online booking system for in-office driver licensing appointments

Starting today, ICBC is moving to an appointment-based system for most driver licensing office transactions. As customer volume increases, ICBC is asking customers to book an appointment before visiting an ICBC office for transactions such as driver licence renewals and knowledge tests.  This ensures that ICBC continues to adhere to physical distancing guidelines set by the Provincial Health Officer.

As of today, customers can book their appointment through icbc.com. When booking a visit to a driver licensing office, customers will be able to choose a location and time that is convenient for them, allowing customers to plan their visit in advance. Customers will be asked to arrive 10 minutes prior to their appointment and to ensure they have the required documentation with them. This online booking system is not for booking road tests.

ICBC is strongly advising customers to book an appointment at least three weeks in advance of their driver licence expiring, as walk-in availability will be limited, and waits are anticipated as scheduled appointments take place. The system will offer flexibility for rescheduling and cancelling appointments if needed. Customers will receive a confirmation email as well as two reminder emails with instructions ahead of the appointment. Consistent with public health guidelines, ICBC is asking customers not to attend an office if they are experiencing any COVID-19 symptoms.

Customers who need to pay a ticket, obtain their driver history/abstract or update their address can continue to do so online or by phone.

For more information on ICBC’s services during the pandemic, visit icbc.com/covid-19.

#DriveSmartBC – Stay Between the Lines

 

Traffic IslandOne sure sign of growing up when we were young was the ability to use our crayons and colour between the lines. An important skill for a “grown-up” driver is also the ability to stay between the lines. Judging by the e-mails that I continually receive from readers who state that this is their main pet peeve, there is a sizable number of drivers out there who need to do a bit more skill improvement.

Staying centered in your lane is not difficult. Here’s a beginner’s tip from the Tuning Up Guide:

The first thing you may notice as you begin driving in moderate traffic is that you have to stay in the centre of your lane. To start with, this is no easy task. The magic rule: look the way you want to go. If you keep looking 12 seconds ahead down the centre of the lane, your peripheral vision will help you centre yourself.

If you haven’t been on the inside of a curve lately and met an oncoming driver part way over the center line into your lane, a quick look at the lines painted on the road will tell you that many tires have passed over the paint and worn it away.

It shouldn’t matter if you cross over the lines when no one is coming should it? Well, it’s both illegal in that situation and will end up in a collision the first time you fail to see the oncoming vehicle. It will be really interesting if that driver is doing the same thing!

Perhaps more common still is the encroachment onto the shoulder when drivers go around a corner. This territory is the domain of pedestrians and cyclists, your vehicle does not belong there. It’s hardly likely that you would be injured or killed in a collision here but the same cannot be said for the unprotected shoulder users.

Should vehicles have to become smarter than their drivers? Your next new vehicle may have lane keeping assist to help you stay where you are supposed to be.

One side effect of this safety feature will be enforcement of signalling lane changes. If you fail to signal your lane change, the system will see this as a drift to one side and will take action to alert you.

Here in Canada, winter snow hides the lines on the road. Unless it is unsafe to do, your guide is the tire tracks left by the vehicles that have already been driven there.

So, show a little pride in your ability to be a mature, skillful driver. Keep your vehicle inside that 3.6 meter wide space between the lines. This will also show your respect for other road users and help to keep them safe. If you cannot, it’s time to put your crayons back in the box and let someone else do the driving.

References:

Cst. Tim Schewe (Ret.) runs DriveSmartBC, a community web site about traffic safety in British Columbia. For 25 years he was an officer with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, including five years on general duty, 20 in traffic and 10 as a collision analyst responsible for conducting technical investigations of collisions. He retired from policing in 2006 but continues to be active in traffic safety through the DriveSmartBC web site, teaching seminars and contributing content to newspapers and web sites.

www.drivesmartbc.ca

Why don’t we have pay-per-mile auto insurance in Canada?

Why don’t we have pay-per-mile auto insurance in Canada?

The excerpted article was written by THE GLOBE AND MAIL

 I see ads on American TV for pay-per-mile insurance, where you just pay for how much you drive. The ads sound great; it really makes sense, especially now. Is that really how it works? Do any Canadian companies offer this? If not, why? – Rajinder, Ottawa

In Canada, we don’t have the option to buy insurance by the mile – or in our case, by the kilometre. The technology is already used here, but the rules in most provinces don’t allow it. “The regulations in the United States allow for companies to price per mile,” says Ryan Stein, executive director of auto-insurance policy and innovation at the Insurance Bureau of Canada (IBC). “In Canada, our regulators decided they want to take a more cautious approach.”

Pay-per-mile insurance uses a telematics device that’s attached to your car and sends information to the insurance company – including mileage, when you drive, speed and how hard you brake.

Pure pay-per-mile insurance, offered by two U.S. companies, charges you a base monthly rate and then, on top of that, charges you for the actual distance you drive.

“There’s a monthly base rate,” Stein says. “So if you’re paying $200 a month now, your base rate would be a fraction of that.” For instance, on the website for Metromile, a U.S. company that only offers pay-per-mile insurance, a fictional 40-year-old male driving a 2015 Honda Fit in Seattle would pay a base rate of US$53 a month. Then there would be charges of 6.7 US cents per mile up to 250 miles (402 km) per day. So, driving 50 miles (80 km) a month would raise the total bill to US$56. At 200 miles (322 km), it would be US$67.

TELEMATICS FOR DISCOUNTS ONLY

Since 2012, several Canadian insurance companies have offered telematics, but, in most provinces, they can only use them to give you a discount – not to set your rates. “You get priced as you always would, but you’ll get a discount if you drive safely,” Stein says.

Stein says provincial insurance regulators in Ontario, Alberta, Nova Scotia and Newfoundland should change the rules to allow pay-per-mile insurance. That means they can’t use telematics data to add to your bill.

“I don’t believe there are rules against it in Quebec or New Brunswick, but most of the insurance companies are national,” Stein says. “If it were allowed in more of the major markets, that could have implications for the rest of the country.” Pay-per-mile insurance “isn’t for everybody,” because higher-mileage drivers wouldn’t save anything – but it would make sense for people who don’t drive often, Stein says.

“Look at what happened during the pandemic – people went from commuting every day to barely driving,” Stein says. “If you had pay-per-mile insurance, your premium would just automatically be lower without you having to let your insurance company know.”

PAY AS YOU GO?

In Ontario, CAA Insurance has been offering MyPace, a pay-as-you-go plan, since 2018. It’s not exactly pay-per-mile, but it lets you pay a base rate, and then pay a fixed amount for every 1,000 kilometres you drive.

The company calculates your premium the same way it normally would – based on your car, driving record, age, gender, annual mileage and where you live – but breaks it into 1000-km segments. For instance, if you normally pay $1,100 per year, you would pay an annual base rate of $200 and then $100 for every 1,000 km, CAA says. You get notices as you get closer to the 1,000 km threshold. Once you’re over, you automatically buy the next 1,000 km. “If you only drive 5,000 km in a year, you’ll save 30 per cent,” says Matthew Turack, president of CAA Insurance. Turack recommends the plan for people who drive less than 9,000 km a year. If you drive more than than that, you will pay a surcharge – CAA says it’s about $8 or less – for every additional 1,000 km.

“This fee will put you above the price of our traditional auto insurance policy,” CAA’s website says.

Turack says rules aren’t the reason CAA Insurance chose pay-as-you-go instead of pay-per-mile. “We’ve never had any resistance from the regulator,” Turack says. “CAA Insurance didn’t go to billing for individual kilometres because of feedback we saw in the States, where consumers were surprised at their bills at the end of the month.”

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