CAA Insurance & Octo Telematics Named Best Technology Provider at ICTA 2019

Insurance telematics leader wins for work on CAA’s MyPace™

NEWTON, Mass. — Octo Telematics, a leading global provider of telematics and data analytics solutions for the auto insurance industry, with their partner CAA Insurance, was named the Best Technology Provider at the 2019 Insurance-Canada.ca Technology Conference in Toronto on Tuesday, February 26. Winners were selected by a jury from among five impressive finalists. Both companies were recognized for CAA MyPace™, Canada’s first “pay-as-you-drive” insurance offering.

Octo provided a customized solution and flexible mix-and-match service selection for CAA to build a new customer experience for policyholders. The app allows motorists to track how much they are driving and to pay for auto insurance based on that mileage.

“We recognized the value that a partnership with an industry pioneer like Octo Telematics would bring to our solution and it’s nice that industry leaders have recognized their contribution to our success,” said Robin Joshua, vice president, CAA Insurance. “Octo’s storied history in insurance telematics made them an obvious choice as a technology provider for our disruptive, first-of-its-kind program in Canada. We’re proud that the program has been recognized as a leading example in the insurance industry.”

CAA’s MyPace allows motorists to have more control over their auto insurance. Through telematics and new billing technologies, MyPace allows motorists to track how much they drive and pay for auto insurance based on that mileage. CAA Insurance integrated several existing technology platforms and developed new properties to enable this first-to-market offering in a way that created no disruption to the motorist. Drivers simply insert a telematics device into their car, download an app, and then drive.

“Today’s connected insurance revolution, at its core, is about making insurance better through the IoT. Congratulations to CAA on pushing the envelope and embracing IoT to provide enhanced offerings to its policyholders,” said Geoff Werner, Americas’ Country Manager at Octo Telematics. “We are proud to be a part of this innovative offering and delighted that we could help expand CAA’s value proposition by quickly integrating and deploying a program that fit their needs. Thank you to Insurance-Canada.ca and the ICTA jury for the recognition of our role in this initiative.”

About Octo Telematics
Octo is the number 1 global provider of telematics and data analytics solutions for the auto insurance industry. Founded in 2002, Octo is one of the pioneers of the insurance telematics industry. Today, Octo is the largest and most experienced insurance telematics company in the world, transforming auto insurance through behavioral, contextual and driving analytics for more than 100 insurance partners.

Octo has more than 5.6 million connected users and the largest global database of telematics data, with over 228 billion miles of driving data collected and 456,000 crashes and insurance events analyzed (as of December 30, 2018). Octo applies proprietary algorithms to this market-leading database to deliver powerful new insights into driver risk, informing solutions that benefit both auto insurance companies and policyholders.

The company is headquartered in Rome, with offices in Boston, London, Stuttgart, Madrid, Mexico, and Sao Paulo. http://www.octotelematics.com

About CAA Insurance
CAA Insurance Company is a national property and casualty insurance company, providing home and auto insurance products distributed through CAA Clubs and select brokerages. Established in 1974, the company has roots in protecting motorists as part of the CAA Club Group of Companies, which includes two automobile clubs — CAA South Central Ontario and CAA Manitoba, helping over 2.2 million members stay mobile, safe and protected.

ICBC, police and government continue to find new ways to tackle distracted driving

ICBC, police and government continue to find new ways to tackle distracted driving

With more than one in four fatal crashes on B.C. roads involving driver distraction, ICBC, police and government continue to look for solutions to combat this dangerous driving behaviour that claims 77 lives each year.*

Crashes reached a record high in 2017, with many of these caused by distracted or inattentive driving. Distracted driving involves any non-driving activity that reduces a driver’s ability to focus on the road or control their vehicle, and is the leading contributing factor in police-reported injury crashes in B.C.

As part of the commitment to make roads safer, ICBC is inviting eligible drivers to participate in a telematics pilot project starting this summer. The goal is to determine whether using this technology can improve road safety and driving behaviour for inexperienced drivers in B.C.

Eligibility is based on driving experience and will be open to all drivers entering the novice stage of the Graduated Licensing Program and for drivers who have held a full drivers license for less than five years. The project was originally announced in November, and further details, including the telematics vendor, will be released later this spring.

The B.C. government, police and ICBC conduct two distracted driving education and enhanced enforcement campaigns every year. The campaigns also include advertising and social media support.

This month, drivers will be hearing one united message – take a break from your phone when you’re behind the wheel. Enhanced police enforcement of distracted driving will take place across B.C., including a province-wide blitz on Friday, and community volunteers are conducting Cell Watch deployments to remind drivers to leave their phone alone when driving.

Drivers can do their part by avoiding distractions while driving and encouraging others to do the same. Activate Apple’s Do Not Disturb While Driving feature or what’s similarly available on other devices. Free ‘not while driving’ decals are available at ICBC driver licensing offices and participating Autoplan broker offices for drivers to support the campaign and encourage other road users to leave their phones alone.

You can view tips and statistics in an infographic at icbc.com, and register your interest in participating in the pilot project at icbc.com/driverpilot.

Quotes:

David Eby, Attorney General

“Distracted driving endangers the lives of British Columbians with devastating effects for families and communities. It also puts significant pressure on insurance rates. That’s why we introduced tougher penalities for distracted drivers last year. Improving road safety is key to creating a sustainable auto insurance system with more affordable rates for everyone.”

Police Chief Neil Dubord, Chair B.C. Association of Chiefs of Police Traffic Safety Committee

“Since 2010, police have issued more than 370,000 tickets for electronic device use, which tells us that distracted and inattentive driving continues to be an ongoing issue on B.C. roads. Police will be out in full force this month ensuring you to put your phone away when you’re behind the wheel.”

Lindsay Matthews, ICBC’s Vice-President Public Affairs

“This telematics pilot project will enable us to better understand the role that technology can play in reducing distraction and preventing crashes for inexperienced drivers. But safer roads start with every driver making a conscious decision to focus on the road and leave their phones alone. You’re five times more likely to crash if you’re using your phone while driving. Let’s all do our part to create a safer driving culture in B.C.”

Regional statistics*:

  • Every year, on average, 27 people are killed in distracted driving-related crashes in the Lower Mainland.

  • Every year, on average, 10 people are killed in distracted driving-related crashes on Vancouver Island.

  • Every year, on average, 28 people are killed in distracted driving-related crashes in the Southern Interior.

  • Every year, on average, 13 people are killed in distracted driving-related crashes in the North Central region.


Editor’s note:
 Photo/video opportunities of police blitz in Surrey, White Rock and North Vancouver on March 1st. Please contact ICBC for details.

*Police data from 2013 to 2017. Distraction: where one or more of the vehicles involved had contributing factors including use of communication/video equipment, driver inattentive and driver internal/external distraction.

Traffic congestion, collision frequency and increased repair costs have a significant impact on the premiums drivers pay in the GTA.

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Things That Go Bump in the Parking Lot

Intersection CrashDriveSmartBC

This is a short story about things that go bump in the parking lot. The outcome could have been a lot simpler with a bit of courtesy and the sharing of required information but it didn’t happen that way. I wonder what the ultimate cost will be when all is said and done.

I was waiting to turn left from the main access into a parking aisle at the mall along with a car opposing me and traffic behind me. There was a vehicle further along the aisle backing out, so we all waited.

When the vehicle had backed out, we all began to enter the aisle in turn until the car in front of me stopped.

The driver began to back up and when it was clear that a collision with me was imminent I sounded my vehicle’s horn. The car stopped, pulled ahead and began to back up again. This time sounding the horn did not help and a small collision occurred.

We moved out of the way and I got out and approached the other driver, a woman that I estimate was in her early 80’s. Her first words to me were “Why didn’t you get out of my way?”

If the other traffic had not been stopped behind me, I certainly would have tried to.

Her next piece of advice was that “Trucks should not be in this parking lot anyway, they belong out there in the back 40.” and gestured to the far edge of the lot.

I asked her to exchange information with me and she refused. She refused again after I tried to explain that we were required to do this.

I was beginning to become concerned about this reluctance and while I considered what to do next three people approached me to state that they had watched the incident occur and offered to provide their contact information. This was a very personal reminder that people willing to help are all around us. Thank you very much!

At this point the woman decided that she should examine my truck for damage. As we walked to it, she remarked that I looked like a cop. I told her that I used to be one and was surprised when she responded with “It figures. You’ve got nothing better to do than cause trouble for others.”

I took my cell phone out and photographed her, then went back to her car and photographed it.

She came back, got into her car and departed.

Now what to do? The damage to my truck amounted to a scuff on the bumper and I would have been prepared to shrug it off had she identified herself and appeared apologetic.

Maybe she was embarrassed, just a miserable person or wanted to avoid losing a safe driving discount. Worse still, maybe she didn’t have a driver’s licence or had reached the end of her ability to drive safely. The decision about whether to do anything was left up to me, along with the worry that she might try to report this as my fault.

Lawyers coaching B.C. doctors to avoid injury caps under new auto insurance rules

B.C. doctors are being coached by trial lawyers to avoid classifying motor-vehicle injuries as “minor” under new rules that, starting in April, will cap some claims.

“An early and optimistic prognosis will have a devastating impact on your patients’ legal rights if their recovery does not ultimately follow this course,” law firm Murphy Battista warned physicians in a Jan. 24 letter.

“An example of a way in which a patient’s rights can be protected is if the family physician explains they ‘don’t yet know’ whether an injury will cause that patient ‘serious impairment.’ ”

That letter and others like it have prompted the organization representing physicians to urge its members to guard against what it describes as a campaign of misinformation around the changes to insurance settlements introduced by the Insurance Corporation of British Columbia.

“Doctors of BC has been made aware there are letters, flyers and other types of communications being sent to physicians that may contain misleading and inaccurate information about new ICBC regulations for treatment of patients,” reads a Feb. 14 statement from the association to physicians.

Doctors of BC says the changes will not limit patient care or restrict physicians from making independent medical decisions. In fact, it says, patients will have access to more options for treatment.

“Under the new legislation, the overall allowance for medical care and recovery expenses will double to $300,000 to better support patients injured in a crash. ICBC will also pay more per treatment based on fair market rates and customers will no longer be out-of-pocket for most expenses.”

Last year, Attorney-General David Eby described ICBC as “a financial dumpster fire” and announced dramatic changes to rein in costs. The Crown corporation is on track to post losses of $1-billion for each of the past two years.

The provincial government passed legislation to curb skyrocketing payments for minor-injury claims by capping settlements for pain and suffering at $5,500 and limiting when accident victims can sue.

In the newsletter Bridge, which provides “legal perspectives of interest to the medical doctor,” physicians are advised to avoid using the grading system in the paperwork that ICBC will use to determine if an injury falls within the cap.

“Initially, the physician may have attached a Grade 2 [that would fall under the cap] to the patient. It may be difficult to re-classify. In light of this issue, it may be prudent for the physician to initially stroke through the Grades with the statement ‘Not possible to assign grade at this time.’”

The changes have put the government at odds with the Trial Lawyers Association of B.C. The group warns that injured individuals are paying the price for financial mismanagement at ICBC. The organization declined to respond to interview requests from The Globe and Mail.

Vancouver lawyer Joe Murphy, co-founder of the firm Murphy Battista, said it is perfectly reasonable for lawyers to point out to doctors the impact their assessments could have on their patients’ rights.

“Unfortunately, you’ll find out if you have an accident that you are not entitled to treatments unless the adjuster decides you are,” he said in an interview.

He said the Doctors of BC statement is itself rife with inaccuracies.

“It is ironic. I’ve read through this, and many of the statements are based on inaccurate or misleading information. I don’t think the person who wrote this read the legislation,” he said.

Mr. Eby said in an interview on Thursday that he has heard from doctors about the unsolicited legal advice they are getting. “I’m glad the Doctors of BC are prepared to step up and warn physicians to call out misinformation when they see it.”

The Doctors of BC was consulted on the improvements to benefits for lost pay and medical rehabilitation for all people injured in accidents − the first major improvements in auto-accident benefits in more than 25 years.

Andrew Yu was one of the physicians who collaborated on the ICBC changes on behalf of Doctors of BC. He said members should not be influenced by lawyers when it comes to assessing their patients. “Some of these letters and brochures seem to offer direction on what words to use or not to use. We support the autonomy of family physicians to use their clinical discretion,” he said.

Source: The Globe and Mail

400 plus vehicles written off since acid spill on B.C. highway last year: ICBC

TRAIL, B.C. _ British Columbia’s public auto insurer says about 450 vehicles have been written off since sulphuric acid spilled along a busy commuter route near Trail, B.C., in two incidents last spring.

The Insurance Corp. of B.C. says there have been more than 4,450 claims received in the wake of the spills but the vast majority of those vehicles were not damaged.

It says it is still in the early stages of a lawsuit but no trial date has been set.

The spills happened on April 10 and May 23, 2018, when tanker trucks owned and operated by Westcan spilled sulphuric acid from Teck’s plant in Trail along a stretch of highway near the city.

ICBC filed a notice of civil claim against Teck Metals, Teck Resources, Internaitonal Raw Materials, Westcan, the Regional District of Kootenay Boundary, the City of Trail, two drivers and the provincial government in October.

Most defendents have filed responses denying responsibility.

The insurer alleges that it has incurred “extraordinary expenses” in investigating and addressing the “enormous volume of claims resulting form the spills, and says the defendents failed to warn the public to avoid the highway.

It also claims the acid was not properly secured and the facility and tankers weren’t properly inspected.

When the spills happened, ICBC alleges there was no prompt response, posted warnings or restriction on public access, and the defendents failed to reduce the risk of future spills.

ICBC is seeking costs and damages.

But Teck alleges that ICBC was not obligated to compensate the owners of damaged vehicles under comprehensive or collision insurance and any such payments were voluntary, while Westcan says RCMP should have diverted traffic.

The city says it has no responsibility for road maintenance, including responding to hazardous spills.

The regional district says that while it has an emergency response agreement with Teck, it doesn’t consider hazardous spills an emergency.

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