Peel Mutual Insurance First in Canada to Launch Hi Marley

Peel Mutual Insurance looks to drive customer centric experience with Hi Marley’s AI-based texting platform built specifically for insurance.

BOSTON, Feb. 18, 2020 /CNW/ — Peel Mutual, one of the largest members of the Ontario Mutuals, is also committed to being the best mutual insurer in Ontario. As a forward-thinking organization that continually looks to innovative, Peel Mutual has launched Hi Marley to continue to deliver an outstanding customer experience built on trust.

Peel Mutual is leveraging Hi Marley to assist in their auto, home and business claims teams. Their aim to be the first insurance carrier offering Hi Marley in Canada is differentiating them by committing dedication to their insureds. They seek to provide a seamless and simple texting solution for their policyholders and offer modern day technology advancements for their claims adjusters.

Irene Bianchi, CEO for Peel Mutual, says, “We are so excited to start the new year off with a better communication commitment to our policyholders. We strive to leverage cutting edge technology in a simple way that today’s customers just expect.”

Dan Heap, VP of Claims, adds, “We are proud to offer not just a texting solution for our insureds, but also a more simple and efficient way for our team to handle claims.”

The Hi Marley platform addresses a significant industry issue of phone tag by connecting carriers and customers through two-way texting. They can communicate and exchange pictures and document, while the insurance-specific AI enables the process. Carriers can start with zero IT effort, delight customers with exceptional service and resolve claims faster. After successful results with US insurers, Hi Marley is now available in Canada.

Mitesh Suchak, COO of Hi Marley, said, “We are thrilled to be working with Peel Mutual and their innovative team. It is very exciting to support them as the first carrier to offer Hi Marley in the Canadian marketplace.”

About Hi Marley, Inc.

Hi Marley is a software provider offering the first AI-enabled conversation platform specifically designed for the insurance industry.  Hi Marley enables insurance carriers to easily and quickly communicate with customers and other partners in the insurance ecosystem so they can deliver an optimal customer experience. The platform has flexible APIs and requires zero integration to get started. Learn more at  www.himarley.com.

About Peel Mutual Insurance

Peel Mutual has been providing quality insurance products and serving Ontario residents since 1876. As one of the largest members of the Ontario Mutuals, we are owned and directed by our policyholders and represent one of the strongest, most secure financial networks in the world. We offer a complete line of residential, automobile, farm and commercial insurance products tailored to protect you and your family. Learn more at www.peelmutual.com.

SOURCE Hi Marley, Inc.

Related Links

https://himarley.com

Let’s Block the Road!

When I was posted in the Okanagan in the 1990s I was answering phones in the detachment dispatch office. A caller from Summerland asked what would happen if he decided to take his protest sign down to the highway and conduct his own personal blockade. He expressed the opinion that if he did that the police would arrive quickly and if he did not move he would be removed.I couldn’t argue his point.

This past week has seen a number of blockades of B.C. highways and other places, so I thought that it would be interesting to examine why groups were permitted to disrupt our everyday travels to express a point.

My first stop was the Guide to the Law of Protest published by McGrady Law of Vancouver. This document outlines some history of civil disobedience in B.C., examines a person’s right to protest, outlines how to conduct yourself and how the law may be applied to you when you do.

Next, I contacted the Ministry of Public Safety & Solicitor General via the media contact information. All that they would say beyond the fact that the Motor Vehicle Act did not direct police to dismantle blockades was that the Ministry did not get involved in day to day police operations. When asked about setting government policy all further e-mail was ignored.

Government policy is published in the form of the Crown Counsel Policy Manual on Civil Disobedience and Contempt of Related Court Orders. This guides Crown lawyers in deciding whether they should prosecute protesters or not. I don’t doubt that this guides police decisions as well.

Media relations with the RCMP in B.C. were helpful. They explained that each situation is evaluated separately and that a balance had to be struck between Charter rights, criminal actions, court orders and public safety. Where there is no court order, police can rely on the Criminal Code and common law powers in the event of violence or criminal actions by protesters.

Police resources to cope with the size of the protest group is without a doubt an important consideration.

Finally, the most assistance came from the B.C. Civil Liberties Association (BCCLA):

First of all, regarding the “free passage of traffic”, operating a motor vehicle is a privilege not a right.

Second, streets are blocked off for various reasons on a regular basis. Examples include activities related to the film industry, parades, marathons, and marches. Police are present to ensure that the scene is safe and the traffic is diverted. These events typically occur on main thoroughfares. A double standard applied in the case of lawful protest would be unreasonable.

Third, roads are public places in which political expression can take place. The rights to freedom of expression and assembly are enshrined in the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and are necessary in a free and democratic society. Furthermore, the police have a duty to ensure a safe environment for members of the public to express themselves through non-violent protest and civil disobedience.

Finally, during the course of their duties, police are constantly balancing interests and re-evaluating their discretion. In the event of an emergency, police have the option to use their discretion to clear the way for an emergency vehicle. A court would likely uphold the infringement of Charter-protected rights to allow for the safe passage of an emergency vehicle.

A counter-protest to a blockade on Highway 19 in Courtenay did result in an arrest and an end to the blockade. The original protesters left out of concern for their own safety.

Returning to the inquiry that I mentioned at the start of the article, the BCCLA says that there is no difference between the right of the individual and the right of the group to protest, but I do wonder what would happen.

Cst. Tim Schewe (Ret.) runs DriveSmartBC, a community web site about traffic safety in British Columbia. For 25 years he was an officer with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, including five years on general duty, 20 in traffic and 10 as a collision analyst responsible for conducting technical investigations of collisions. He retired from policing in 2006 but continues to be active in traffic safety through the DriveSmartBC web site, teaching seminars and contributing content to newspapers and web sites.

www.drivesmartbc.ca

Drivers could see a jump in their auto insurance, despite the Ford Government promising a reduction

Ontario auto insurance taking a jump

By Tim Herd | KitchenerToday

Ontario has some of the highest auto insurance rates in the country. The province is second to British Columbia, and now rates are set to climb even higher. Drivers could face up to an 11 per cent increase.

Rob Deutschmann, Personal Injury Lawyer, Deutschmann Law was on the Mike Farwell Show on 570 NEWS on Thursday.

He said it’s not the same across the board. “1.6 per cent for the most part, but there are a couple of companies that had to have excessively higher rates.”

The increase in rates has started a debate between public and private insurance. BC already has public auto insurance. Deutschmann said Ontario should not follow suit because BC is seeing significant cuts, and has the most expensive auto insurance in the country.

Deutschmann added one of the issues with this increase is that the Insurance Board of Canada (IBC) and the industry have most of the control, and keeps the Ontario government out of the loop.

In Ontario, accidents and death rates are low and benefits continue to get slashed. “Since 2010 we’ve had significant cuts to accident benefits in Ontario,” says Deutschmann. A decade later he says roughly 70-80 per cent of auto accident victims in Ontario only have access to $3,500 in accident benefits.

Source: KitchenerToday

SGI: Tougher distracted driving fines take effect Feb. 1

February’s Traffic Safety Spotlight is focused on distracted driving – just as fines are set to increase Feb. 1, 2020.

“Distracted driving is a serious safety concern in our province, and on roads all over the country,” said the Honourable Joe Hargave, Minister Responsible for SGI. “We hope by introducing tougher penalties – and especially strong penalties for repeat offenders – it will mean fewer people driving distracted and fewer tickets issued.”

What’s new: Here are the consequences distracted drivers can expect as of Feb. 1:

  • First offence – ticket more than doubles to $580, plus four demerits.
  • Second offence within a year of being convicted of the first – $1,400 ticket, plus an additional four demerits, plus an immediate, seven-day vehicle seizure. Vehicle owners are responsible for the towing and impound fees (cost varies according to mileage, but expect to pay approximately $400 at least).
  • Third offence within a year of conviction of the first – $2,100 ticket, plus four more demerits and another seven-day vehicle seizure.

The demerits could also cost the driver insurance discounts they had earned or – if they are on the negative side of the SGI Safe Driver Recognition (SDR) scale – additional financial penalties, at $50 for every point below zero.  If a driver started at zero, and received three distracted driving tickets in a year, they would have to pay a total of $1,200 in SDR financial penalties, on top of the other financial impacts.

What’s not changing:  While the cost of a ticket is increasing, the laws around distracted driving remain the same. Hand-held devices are prohibited for learner, novice and experienced drivers, although experienced drivers can use hands-free functions on mounted devices through voice commands or one-touch. The vast majority of distracted driving tickets that are issued by law enforcement are related to cell phone use. In addition, drivers can receive a ticket if an officer witnesses behaviour that they can prove take a driver’s attention away from the road to the point they are operating their vehicle in an unsafe manner.

In 2018, driver distraction or inattention was a factor in more than 6,000 collisions, resulting in 774 injuries and 22 deaths. In 2019, distracted driving set three monthly records for the number of tickets issued.

Have questions about distracted driving? We answered most of them on Facebook. And if you’re looking to avoid a distracted driving ticket, put the phone down behind the wheel – and check out these other tips.

 

Province provides green light to automobile insurance hikes

The excerpreted article was written by Brian Passifiume | Toronto Sun 

Regardless to be amongst Canada’s most dependable motorists, Ontario motorists will begin to spend additional to guarantee their particular autos.

Ontario’s Monetary Companies Regulatory Authority (FSRA) authorised charge hikes for 21 coverage businesses — representing roughly 40% of this province’s motorists — in a quarterly report published into the authority’s web web site last thirty days.

On common, customers might find their particular premiums get up by 1.6% through the whole market — straight down through the two.6% improve authorised inside the 3rd one-fourth of 2019.

Some motorists could see their costs enhance by as a great deal as 10% — and also 11% — as it is the truth with customers of COSECO Insurance coverage Co. and Scottish and York Insurance coverage Co. of Canada, correspondingly.

Hikes for every businesses took influence in the beginning of February.

Different insurers authorised for fee will boost embody Continental Casualty Co. (eight%,) Assure Co. of North America (7.5%,) SGI Canada (practically 10%) and Intact (5%.)

Ontario will continue to position one of many costliest provinces in Canada to guarantee a automotive.

Knowledge from automobile insurance coverage aggregator Kanetix shows premiums in north and east Brampton typical round $2,593 per 12 months — the greatest inside the country or over about $100 when compared with a 12 months in past times.

Neighbourhoods in north Toronto have observed their fees surge, with yearly costs from Rexdale east to Black Creek hovering round $2,590.

On common, Ontarians pay $1,505 per 12 months in automobile insurance protection, as a result to figures from the Basic Insurance protection Statistical Company.

British Columbia remains ideal on typical, at $1,832 per 12 months.

In Alberta, the put the UCP authorities not long ago scrapped laws and regulations capping advanced will boost at 5% annually, insurance plans common round $1,316.

The speed hikes in Ontario come less than a 12 months after previous finance minister Vic Fedeli, throughout their unveiling for the province’s 2019 funds, hinted at making ‘transformative changes’ to auto coverage.

Invoice 42, suggested final 12 months by Computer MPP Parm Gill, named for an finish to advanced hikes primarily based on geographical area. The charge passed 2nd learning final March and are at the minute sooner than committee.

bpassifiume@postmedia.com

Do I need a licence to drive on private property?

The excerpted article was written by THE GLOBE AND MAIL

I recently bought a place down in Nova Scotia with 20 acres of land. Do I need a drivers licence to drive my pickup to plow the road on my own land? Also, do I need to have registration and insurance? – Kevin

As long as you stay home on the range, you probably don’t technically need a licence, registration or insurance to drive a car or truck.

But without them, you might not be protected if that truck is stolen, vandalized or hits somebody.

Nova Scotia’s Motor Vehicle Act requires drivers to be licensed and vehicles to be registered and insured when driving on “a public highway, street, lane, road, alley, park, beach or place including the bridges thereon,” said Marla MacInnis, spokeswoman for Nova Scotia Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal, in an e-mail.

If you’re on private property, those rules generally don’t apply – unless “the private property is designed to be and is accessible for the general public.”

So, you’d need a licence and registration in a Costco parking lot, for instance. But you wouldn’t need them on your own land as long as you’re not operating a business that’s open to the public.

So, technically, anybody could drive your farm truck – even someone who isn’t old enough to get a licence or someone who has a suspended licence – as long as they stay on your property.

When that vehicle leaves your property, even just to cross a public road, it needs to be registered and insured, and you need a licence to drive it.

GO PUBLIC?

The rules are similar across Canada – you don’t need a licence, registration or insurance to drive a motor vehicle on private property.

But in practice, it could get tricky. Your driveway could be considered a public road if you don’t have a gate. If you hit somebody while plowing it, police could decide to charge you with driving without a licence, insurance and registration.

“Unless you are assured that access to the private land of a farm or a business is controlled – for example, by a barrier – and limited to vehicles authorized by the owner, it would be hazardous to drive without the correct class of license and without the registration certificate and proof of insurance of the vehicle,” said Anne Marie Dussault Turcotte, spokeswoman for the Société d’assurance automobile du Québec (SAAQ), a Crown corporation responsible for licensing, in an e-mail.

Provincial traffic laws generally don’t apply on private property if nobody else can access it. Ontario’s the only province where the Highway Traffic Act doesn’t applyeven on private property at all, even if the public does have access to it.

But in every province, you could still face charges under the Criminal Code of Canada if you crash a vehicle and injure someone.

REST INSURED?

If you’re driving without insurance on your own land, you’re on your own if there’s trouble.

“You would have no coverage for theft or fire [and no coverage for] liability if you hit something or someone,” said Steve Kee, spokesman for the Insurance Bureau of Canada, in an email.

If you have home insurance, it would cover things like riding lawnmowers, but it wouldn’t cover cars, trucks or off-road vehicles, Kee said.

Without liability insurance, you wouldn’t be covered if you’re sued for damages or injuries after a crash.

“Any vehicle without liability coverage is a liability,” Kee said.

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