Bad B.C. drivers to face increased penalties; fines to jump 20 per cent annually

VICTORIA _ Bad drivers in British Columbia have less than 24 hours to improve their habits or face increased penalties for speeding, impaired or distracted driving and other offences.

Attorney General David Eby says in a release that fines applied under the driver risk premium and driver penalty point premium will jump 20 per cent effective Nov. 1, and a further 20 per cent in November 2019.

The driver risk premium is assessed for behaviour such as excessive speeding or two or more distracted driving violations, while the penalty point premium applies to drivers who collect four or more points from traffic violations in a single year.

Both penalties are on top of any fines or other consequences linked to the initial infraction and must be paid before vehicle insurance or a driver’s licence can be renewed.

The Attorney General’s Ministry says driver point premiums currently range from $175 for four points to $24,000 for 50 or more, but the increase will raise those amounts to $210 for four points and $28,800 for 50 or more.

Eby also says penalty premiums will keep pace with hikes in basic insurance offered by the Insurance Corporation of B.C., meaning the public insurer expects to collect $26 million in penalties next year, $32 million in 2020 and $36 million by 2021.

“Reckless drivers put others at risk, and they’re contributing to the rise in crashes we’re seeing on our roads,” Eby said in the release.

He also said higher penalties will hold drivers accountable if they engage in dangerous behaviour while behind the wheel.

The insurance industry will be monitoring any effects on their costs very closely in the coming year.

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IBC reviewing private member’s bill on auto insurance pricing

Insurance Bureau of Canada (IBC) is currently reviewing the private member’s Bill 42, introduced this afternoon by MPP Parm Gill, that looks at eliminating postal code as one factor used in determining risk for auto insurance premiums.

Under the current regulations, auto insurance premiums are based on claims data, including the frequency and cost of collisions. The current regulations are outdated and don’t reflect the realities of today’s drivers.

Ontario’s drivers look forward to an improved regulatory environment. Ontario auto insurers are actively seeking modernized regulation that enables them to meet the needs of Ontario drivers. We are committed to working with government to fix auto insurance in this province,” said Kim Donaldson, Vice-President, Ontario, IBC.

About Insurance Bureau of Canada
Insurance Bureau of Canada (IBC) is the national industry association representing Canada’s private home, auto and business insurers. Its member companies make up 90% of the property and casualty (P&C) insurance market in Canada. For more than 50 years, IBC has worked with governments across the country to help make affordable home, auto and business insurance available for all Canadians. IBC supports the vision of consumers and governments trusting, valuing and supporting the private P&C insurance industry. It champions key issues and helps educate consumers on how best to protect their homes, cars, businesses and properties.

P&C insurance touches the lives of nearly every Canadian and plays a critical role in keeping businesses safe and the Canadian economy strong. It employs more than 126,000 Canadians, pays $9 billion in taxes and has a total premium base of $54.7 billion.

For media releases and more information, visit IBC’s Media Centre at www.ibc.ca. Follow IBC on Twitter @InsuranceBureau or like us on Facebook. If you have a question about home, auto or business insurance, contact IBC’s Consumer Information Centre at 1-844-2ask-IBC.

If you require more information, IBC spokespeople are available to discuss the details in this media release.

SOURCE Insurance Bureau of Canada

IBC: Calling bull on ICBC

Prince George Citizen

In its recent editorial, ICBC is defending its new $50 fee for unlisted driver protection by arguing that this is “common practice across North America and beyond” and that “in many other jurisdictions, insurers will likely not cover your claim if an unlisted driver crashes your vehicle.”

Unfortunately, ICBC’s justification simply does not hold water. As the association representing Canada’s private insurance companies, we are compelled to inform that this is not common practice in other auto insurance markets across Canada or in the United States.

While auto insurers often request drivers to list other family members living in their homes who may use their vehicles, listing all incidental drivers like friends, neighbours, and co-workers is not. Nor is denying claims if an unlisted driver causes an accident.

Many of the upcoming ICBC changes that are designed to price auto insurance based on driver risk and to make accidents follow driver records – as opposed to their vehicles – are an effective way to incent better behavior on our roads, and mirror the way auto insurance is priced in other provinces. ICBC’s new unlisted driver protection fee does not.

With British Columbians paying more for auto insurance than anyone else in Canada, this is just the latest example of why B.C. drivers deserve choice and the freedom to shop around for their auto insurance needs. If ICBC were open to competition and drivers didn’t want to purchase “unlisted driver protection” they wouldn’t have to – they could take their business elsewhere.

Aaron Sutherland

Vice-President, Pacific Region

Insurance Bureau of Canada

 

UBC researchers call on province to roll back 120 km/h speed limits on 1,300 km of roads

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5 drivers with no insurance, licence pulled over in St. John’s region

One woman was on a Canada-wide driving ban; police impounded all of the vehicles

CBC News 

In just 12 hours on Tuesday, the Royal Newfoundland Constabulary pulled over five drivers who didn’t have insurance or a licence.

Around noon, officers pulled over a vehicle and found the driver had a suspended licence.

The 48-year-old woman also didn’t have insurance.

Officers pulled over another vehicle around 7:30 p.m. for defective equipment.

They found the driver was suspended from operating a vehicle, and the vehicle was not insured.

Two more uninsured drivers were pulled over in Kilbride just after 10:30 p.m.

All of those drivers were given tickets and had their vehicles impounded.

And earlier in the day, a woman was found to be driving on a Canada-wide ban and with a suspended licence.

The vehicle she was driving was pulled over around 8:30 a.m. in Conception Bay South.

The 33-year-old woman was arrested and held overnight, and the vehicle was also impounded.

Source: CBC News

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