Honda Canada Drives CO2 Emissions Reduction with New Awareness Campaign

NEWS PROVIDED BY

Honda Canada Inc.

  • Industry-first environmental awareness campaign informs consumers of vehicle CO2 emission ratings for the company’s fleet
  • New campaign designed to offer product transparency and support informed purchase decisions
  • Honda Canada’s vehicle fleet had the best overall fuel economy in the industry and emitted less CO2 than the average among internal combustion engine manufacturers, according to the latest GHG report issued by Environment and Climate Change Canada for 2017.1

MARKHAM, ON, Jan. 6, 2020 /CNW/ – Today, Honda Canada launched a bold new environmental campaign entitled ‘Driven to Reduce Emissions Since 1948’, designed to help Canadian consumers reduce their personal carbon footprint.  A first of its kind, the awareness campaign posts government-verified vehicle CO2 emission ratings directly on Honda.cafor every model Honda sells in Canada.  Similar to food service providers listing caloric information offering product transparency, vehicle Emission Indicator badges display the grams per kilometre driven emission rating, supporting informed purchase decisions for consumers. The campaign also educates Canadians on Honda’s global philosophy and vision of reducing overall CO2 emissions from its products and all aspects of its business and manufacturing operations.

According to the latest Green House Gas (GHG) report issued by Environment and Climate Change Canada for 2017, Honda Canada’s vehicle fleet had the best overall fuel economy in the industry and emitted less CO2 than the average among internal combustion engine manufacturers.1

“Bringing CO2 emission information to consumers’ attention aligns with our belief that lowering emissions of vehicles on the road in Canada is the best way for us to help combat climate change,” said Dave Gardner, President and CEO of Honda Canada Inc. “Our customers can still choose to drive a Honda vehicle for all of the traditional benefits we bring to the market, such as dependability, quality and reliability, while now being aware of their impact on the environment.”

As society moves towards a more electrified future, the company aims to electrify two-thirds of its global auto sales by 2030. In order to achieve those targets, Honda is taking a measured approach to transitioning from producing mainly internal combustion engines to vehicles equipped with gasoline-hybrid powertrains.

More information on CO2, its relationship to vehicles sold in Canada and what Honda Canada is doing to educate and inform consumers can be found here.

Blue Skies for our Children
At Honda, caring for the environment started with a simple concept:  Blue Skies for our Children. It’s the company’s vision that future generations should experience the joy and freedom of mobility while living in a sustainable society.  Honda is working diligently to reduce all environmental impacts from its products and business activities.

For more information on Honda Canada’s environmental philosophy, please visit HondaCanada.ca.

1 – Environment & Climate Change Canada (published 2019). Greenhouse Gas Emissions Performance for the 2017 Model Year Light-Duty Vehicle Fleet. Retrieved from https://www.canada.ca/en/environment-climate-change/services/canadian-environmental-protection-act-registry/greenhouse-gas-emissions-performance-2017.html

About Honda Canada
Honda Canada Inc. (HCI) was founded in 1969 and is the parent company for both Honda and Acura vehicle brands in Canada.  The company has produced more than eight million cars and light trucks since 1986 at its two manufacturing facilities and builds engines at a third manufacturing plant in Alliston, Ontario.  Both manufacturing facilities are extremely flexible and currently build Honda Civic and CR-V models.  Honda Canada has invested more than $4.7 billionin Canada and each year it sources nearly $2.1 billion in goods and services from Canadian suppliers. Honda Canada has sold more than four million Honda and Acura passenger cars and light trucks in Canada. For more information on Honda Canada, please visit www.hondacanada.ca.

SOURCE Honda Canada Inc.

Hyundai & Kia recall 300,000 vehicles in Canada

Collision Repair Magazine

Toronto, Ontario — Hyundai Auto Canada and Kia Canada have released a recall⁠—or, in the automakers’ words, a ‘product improvement campaign’—affecting more than 300,000 vehicles in Canada.

The recall affects the automakers’ natural aspirated 2.4-litre four-cylinder engine, as well as the turbocharged 2.0-litre four-cylinder engine. Both Hyundai and Kia will perform an engine control module update on the affected vehicles to assure its ability to detect potential problems prior to engine failure. Not only could a failed engine cost thousands of dollars to repair, but it causes a sudden loss of power⁠—introducing huge risks to safety.

Hyundai Canada is recalling 275,533 cars and SUVS, including the 2019 Santa Fe; the 2019 Veloster; all Sante Fe Sport models from 2013 through 2018; 2014, 2015 and 2019 Tuscon models; and all Hyundai Sonata models from 2011 through 2019.

Kia Canada is recalling 26,082 cars and SUVs, including the 2019 and 2020 Sportage models, the 2019 Optima and the 2019 Sorrento.

Hyundai Canada has said owners of Santa Fe Sport, Sonata and Tuscon vehicles who received a similar recall fix in March 2019⁠—which involved 255,000 vehicles⁠—do not require the new update.

Hyundai owners can visit www.hyundaiengineinfo.ca for more information.

Kia Canada owners can click here for more information.

Source: Collision Repair Magazine

ICBC: a crash occurs every three minutes over the holidays

ICBC: a crash occurs every three minutes over the holidays

The holidays are here and many drivers will be traveling to visit family and friends to celebrate. With increased traffic and unpredictable road conditions, it’s important for everyone to be prepared and drive smart.

Over the Christmas holidays and New Year’s, 530 people are injured and two people are killed in 2,000 crashes every year in B.C.* That’s one crash every three minutes.

Here are ICBC’s tips to get home safe this holiday season:

  • Check your vehicle. Many B.C. highways require winter tires, labelled with either the mountain/snowflake symbol or the mud and snow (M+S) designation. Top up wiper fluid for clearer visibility and pack an emergency kit including blanket, food and water.

  • Slow down. Posted speed limits are for ideal conditions only. It takes more time and distance to come to a complete stop on wet, icy or snowy roads. Adjust your speed to the conditions and always maintain a safe travelling distance between vehicles.

  • Avoid distraction. Make important calls and program your GPS before you begin driving and let your family and friends know you’re not available while driving. If you’re on a longer drive, use highway rest stops to take a break and check your messages.

  • Take a break. Pull over as soon as you start to feel drowsy. Get out and walk around to get some fresh air. If that’s not enough, pull over to a safe area, turn off your car and take a nap.

  • Plan for a safe ride home. If your holiday festivities involve alcohol, plan ahead for a safe ride home: arrange a designated driver, call a taxi, take transit or use Operation Red Nose where available. There’s no excuse to drink and drive.

Christmas holiday statistics:*

  • During the Christmas holidays, on average, one person is killed and 350 people are injured in 1,300 crashes in B.C. every year.

  • During the Christmas holidays, on average, 260 people are injured in 810 crashes in the Lower Mainland every year.

  • During the Christmas holidays, on average, 69 people are injured in 340 crashes on Vancouver Island every year.

  • During the Christmas holidays, on average, 45 people are injured in 180 crashes in the Southern Interior every year.

  • During the Christmas holidays, on average, 15 people are injured in 87 crashes in the North Central region every year.

New Year’s statistics:*

  • Every year during New Year’s, on average, one person is killed and 180 people are injured in 700 crashes in B.C.

  • Every year during New Year’s, on average, 130 people are injured in 470 crashes in the Lower Mainland.

  • Every year during New Year’s, on average, 17 people are injured in 78 crashes on Vancouver Island.

  • Every year during New Year’s, on average, 15 people are injured in 95 crashes in the Southern Interior.

  • Every year during New Year’s, on average, nine people are injured in 48 crashes in the North Central region.

*Christmas is defined as 18:00 hours December 24 to midnight December 26. New Year’s is defined as 18:00 hours December 31st of the previous year to midnight January 1 of the New Year. ICBC data for injury and crashes based on five year average (2014 to 2018); police data for fatalities based on five year average (2013 to 2017).

Alberta strikes panel to review auto insurance, won’t bring back rate cap

By Dean Bennett | Canadian Press

Alberta is reviewing auto insurance in the province to ensure that the industry can remain viable and drivers can get affordable coverage.

Finance Minister Travis Toews says Albertans are paying some of the highest rates in Canada but are having trouble getting critical protection such as comprehensive and collision coverage.

But a five per cent annual cap on rate increases, introduced by the former NDP government and abandoned by his United Conservatives, is not coming back, he says.

“In the intermediate and long term it was no solution, and even in the short term it made a bad situation worse.”

Auto insurance rates in Alberta have been rising sharply in the last five years. It trend prompted the NDP government to cap global rate increases at five per cent annually for each insurer starting in 2017.

The new UCP government did not renew the cap in August, and some drivers have since reported getting notices of steep rises in rates of 12 per cent or more.

Insurers have said that under the cap they were losing money in Alberta, given more payouts for car theft, injury claims, repairs and catastrophes such as the 2016 Fort McMurray wildfire.

Toews said the cap forced insurers to seek savings at the expense of drivers by, in some cases, refusing to offer critical protections.

In other cases, individual clients were still hit with steep increases as long as the overall hike by the insurer to all Alberta clients remained at five per cent.

“Under the cap, we had insurers getting squeezed … so Albertans were finding themselves with fewer and fewer insurance options,” said Toews.

A three-member committee headed by Chris Daniels has been asked to research and recommend solutions that work for all parties within the existing privately delivered system.

The committee is to report back in the spring. Toews said the government will take action as soon as possible after that.

Daniels, consumer representative on the Automobile Insurance Rate Board, said there is no single reason for rising costs, although technology has made what used to be minor damage no longer minor.

“A lot of the sensors of those new technologies are located in the windshield, so you have a windshield replacement that used to cost maybe $300 is now costing $1,500.”

The Insurance Bureau of Canada said it welcomes the review, particularly as it relates to injury claims.

“Increases in payouts for minor injuries have led the average claim size to increase by nearly 10 per cent per year,” bureau vice-president Celyeste Power said in a statement.

“Alberta’s three million drivers have said they want more affordable premiums, more choice, and care they can count on when they need it.”

Are Shoulder Checks Necessary?

Shoulder CheckDriveSmartBC

Is it really necessary to make shoulder checks while driving? If you expect to pass a driving exam in British Columbia the answer is a definite yes. However, some driving schools are teaching mirror adjustment techniques to replace shoulder checks.

The shoulder check involves briefly turning your head to the left or right and looking into your blind spots. These are areas that looking in the rearview mirrors will not reveal to a driver. A driver makes a shoulder check when changing directions or lanes to insure that there are no vehicles, bicycles or pedestrians hiding in the blind spots waiting to be collided with.

Another school of thought argues that it is best to keep your eyes forward in the direction of travel and use mirrors and peripheral vision to check surrounding traffic. The idea is that if you place your head against the driver’s door window and adjust the left side view mirror to see your vehicle in the left edge, then move your head to the center of the vehicle and adjust the right side mirror so that you can see your vehicle in the right edge it will allow you to visually cover most of the area beside and behind you with the mirrors when seated normally behind the wheel.

Peripheral vision or a glance left or right will be enough to see what is not shown in the mirrors. I was taught to shoulder check without fail in every case when I took driving instruction. The instructor told me that it was the only sure way to spot all hazards before I moved my vehicle into areas that could conflict with other road users.

I also understand that older drivers normally lose peripheral vision as a consequence of aging so the mirror method outlined above may not be appropriate for everyone. The bottom line? Before you turn or change lanes, it is up to you to make sure that it is safe to do so. Failure to look out for the safety of others will have serious consequences both during a road test and after a collision.

What I’ve Learned from a Year of Driver Monitoring

I’ve been driving with eDriving’s Mentor app for about a year now and know that it has made improvements in my skills. I haven’t cracked the top 10% barrier yet, but I’m still trying! The secret to having a high score appears to be trying to anticipate and plan for what is happening around you as you drive.

Speed is the simplest of the driving tasks to follow but does present its challenges. The riskiest of them is the tendency for other drivers to crowd your back bumper. Why some drivers feel the need to do this on multi laned highways is a bit of a mystery to me.

I wonder if telematics can use the automatic emergency braking system on newer cars to monitor this?

Sudden braking incidents can be prevented by maintaining an appropriate following distance and watching the status of traffic lights as you approach the intersection.

Is it a stale green light? Preparing for the stop doesn’t cost you anything as you are going to have to stop anyway. In fact, it can save you money in the long run by reducing wear on the brakes.

Drivers who fill in your front safety margin and then brake to get ready for a turn or make another lane change mean keeping an eye out behind and beside you as you drive. It would be helpful if they thought about signaling their intentions but the majority seem to signal as they move.

Heavy acceleration has not caused any black marks for me since the first one. I’m never in a hurry to be the first vehicle into an intersection after the lights change and I have not had to take evasive action to prevent a collision, yet.

Smooth lane changes are an easy score. Plan ahead, mirror, signal, shoulder check and change. Simple. Again, I’ve never had to make a sudden move because of the actions of another driver, yet.

The last behaviour that the app watches for are sharp turns. Experience, advisory signs and familiarity with your vehicle are a great help with this. When in doubt, too slow is better than too fast.

I’ve mentioned a potential reduction in vehicle maintenance already but there is another way the app helps pay it’s way. Driving for a good score is also driving for economy. Fewer dollars spent on fuel are healthy for both your wallet and the environment.

There is no doubt in my mind that ICBC will eventually be using driver telematics to set insurance rates. Practice now will make it easier to save money on my insurance bill in the future.

Mentor also supplies me with video training tailored to my driving habits. I’m a bit behind in watching the videos, but I’ve both learned something new and reinforced prior knowledge with them.

Overall, I’m pleased that I have taken the time to use the app. I think that it has made me a better and hopefully safer driver.

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