Anyone who booked appointment on the site should report it to Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre

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Existing policy holders received rebate cheques, but drivers seeking new policies saw higher average prices

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IBC Statement on the Future of Auto Insurance in BC

Aaron Sutherland, Vice-President Pacific, Insurance Bureau of Canada (IBC), issued the following statement:

Today, the BC Liberal Party announced that if elected to form the next government, they will open the province’s vehicle damage market to full competition. This would make British Columbia’s no-fault system – set to come into force in May 2021 – remarkably similar to that of Quebec, a province where injury coverages are provided by the government insurer and vehicle damage coverages are provided by private insurers. Under the Quebec hybrid model, drivers pay an average of $717 for auto insurance – the lowest in Canada – and can shop around to find the best coverage at the best price. That is less than half the $1,500 average premium ICBC projects under its no-fault insurance system.

Under ICBC’s monopoly, BC drivers pay more for car insurance than any other jurisdiction in Canada – be it a public or a privately run system. Canada’s private insurers want to help lower premiums in BC and are committed to working with any government to create a system that works for everyone. Competition is a powerful incentive for any company to deliver the best product at the best possible price. Auto insurance is no exception to this rule.

About Insurance Bureau of Canada
Insurance Bureau of Canada (IBC) is the national industry association representing Canada’s private home, auto and business insurers. Its member companies make up 90% of the property and casualty (P&C) insurance market in Canada. For more than 50 years, IBC has worked with governments across the country to help make affordable home, auto and business insurance available for all Canadians. IBC supports the vision of consumers and governments trusting, valuing and supporting the private P&C insurance industry. It champions key issues and helps educate consumers on how best to protect their homes, cars, businesses and properties.

SOURCE Insurance Bureau of Canada

www.ibc.ca

What hasn’t been revealed is how much extra money drivers had to pay

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SGI’s reminds drivers to stay safe this Labour Day weekend

SGI’s reminds drivers to stay safe this Labour Day weekend

Let’s face it — 2020 has been pretty darned hard. It’s only natural to try to squeeze the last bit of fun out of summer this Labour Day long weekend.

Regardless of whether your long weekend plans take you to the lake or a friend’s backyard, SGI wants to make sure everyone gets there and back without any problems.

With heavier traffic, the risk of a crash doubles over long weekends, but there are plenty of things you can do to keep yourself and other road users safe:

  •  #SlowDown – driving faster than the speed limit or than road conditions allow can affect your control and the time you have to make decisions. Obey posted speed limits. Construction season isn’t over, so keep an especially close eye out for workers in the #OrangeZone.  The road is their office.  And, with harvest underway, be aware that you might encounter farmers moving their equipment between fields, so be sure to slow down and give them space until they are off the roads.

 

  • #DriveSober – Never drive impaired and #BeAGoodWingman by preventing others from driving impaired as well. While we have made strong progress in reducing impaired driving in Saskatchewan, the fight isn’t over.  We want people to always make a plan for a safe ride home, and do it before they crack that beer (or inhale that brownie).

 

  • #BuckleUp – using a seatbelt is a simple behaviour that can save you from serious injury or death in a collision. Need a visual? This video shows what happens to unrestrained occupants in a roll-over (only dummies were severely harmed in the making of that video).  It’s hard to believe in the year 2020, police still catch several hundred drivers every month not wearing their seatbelt.

 

  • #JustDrive – Distracted driving penalties went up in February, but there’s a human cost to driver distraction and inattention, as the leading cause of injury.  Most distracted driving tickets result from phone use.  We have some good tips on what to do with your phone before you drive here.

From everyone at SGI, have a fantastic long weekend!

www.sgi.sk.ca / www.sgicanada.ca

ICBC urges caution over last long weekend of summer

ICBC urges caution over last long weekend of summer

If you’ll be travelling over Labour Day long weekend, ICBC is asking you to share the road and do your part to drive safely.

Every Labour Day long weekend, approximately four people die and 600 people are injured in 2,100 crashes throughout the province.*

The key to sharing the road safely is staying focused on driving and looking out for road users around you. Avoid distractions which will take your eyes off the road and your mind off driving. Police across B.C. are cracking down on distracted drivers as part of this month’s enforcement and education campaign.

Top 4 tips:

  1. If you find it difficult to take a break from your phone while driving, turn it to silent and keep it out of reach and out of sight. You can help keep your family and friends safe by not texting, calling or answering if you know they’re behind the wheel.

  2. Allow at least two seconds of following distance between vehicles in good road conditions, and at least three seconds on high-speed roads. Increase your distance when you’re following a large vehicle such as an RV (it can block your vision) or a motorcycle (it can stop quicker than a car).

  3. With trucks and RVs, keep clear of their blind spots. When following, you should be able to see both mirrors of the RV or truck in front of you. If you’re behind a slow moving RV or truck climbing up a hill, leave extra space and be patient as they’re probably trying their best to keep up with the flow of traffic.

  4. Check road conditions at DriveBC.ca before you leave. Be realistic about travel times and accept delays that may arise. Don’t rush to make up time – slow down to reduce your risk of crashing and arrive at your destination safely. You also save fuel by driving at a steady speed.

Regional statistics over Labour Day weekend:

 

  • On Vancouver Island, on average, 72 people are injured in 310 crashes every year.

  • In the Southern Interior, on average, 70 people are injured in 320 crashes every year.

  • In the North Central region, on average, 20 people are injured in 110 crashes every year.

  • In the Lower Mainland, on average, 440 people are injured in 1,300 crashes every year.

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