Canada: What To Know About Left-Turn Accidents

Article by Gluckstein Personal Injury Lawyers

What to know about left-turn accidents

Traffic accidents always come down to a blame game and the person making the left turn is often in the wrong. About half of all crashes at Canadian intersections involved a vehicle that was turning left, according to a 2007 joint study by the Traffic Injury Research Foundation and the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.

With so many claims stemming from those incidents, the Insurance Bureau of Canada considers all left turns into traffic that lead to an accident, as against insurance company policy.

Before trying to beat the light and making an ill-advised left turn, here are some things drivers should consider:

Different types of insurance

Insurance companies always deem someone at fault in cases of accidents. The fault could be partial or full depending on the circumstances. Individuals deal with their own insurance companies, regardless of who caused the accident. No-fault insurance allows a person to receive part or full coverage by their company regardless of who caused the accident. They can receive medical and other benefits without having to track down the other driver and take them to court. They are also eligible even if they are deemed to have caused the accident.

Proving who’s at fault

Insurance companies determine fault by analyzing accident reports. Therefore, if the other driver committed a traffic violation as well, such as speeding or running a red light, there is room for adjustment. Adjusters can “split the fault” in these situations, instead of the full liability for the driver turning left.

As a driver, proving what happened at the time of the accident is crucial in determining your eligibility for an insurance claim. First-hand witness accounts are helpful in constructing the scene before and after the accident.

An impartial witness is ideal to corroborate your story, especially if you claim that the other driver was at fault.

The content of this article is intended to provide a general guide to the subject matter. Specialist advice should be sought about your specific circumstances.

Source: Mondaq

These are the 10 most stolen cars in Quebec this year

Basem Boshra CTV News Montreal

MONTREAL — The Insurance Bureau of Canda has released its annual list of the most stolen cars in Canada, and in Quebec, the Top 10 list consists of just two makes: Lexus and Toyota.

According to the IBC, these are the 10 most stolen cars in Quebec in 2019:

  1. 2018 Lexus RX350/RX350L/RX450h/RX450hL 4DR AWD
  2. 2018 Lexus NX300/NX300h 4DR AWD
  3. 2017 Lexus RX350/RX450h 4DR AWD
  4. 2016 Lexus RX350/RX450h 4DR AWD
  5. 2017 Toyota HIGHLANDER 4DR 4WD
  6. 2018 Toyota HIGHLANDER 4DR 4WD
  7. 2015 Toyota PRIUS V 5DR
  8. 2017 Lexus NX200t/NX300h 4DR AWD
  9. 2015 Lexus NX200t/NX300h 4DR AWD
  10. 2016 Toyota Highlander 4DR 4WDd

 

Technology & societal changes driving unprecedented customization for consumers

Welcome to the era of ultra-personalized insurance.

CONTENT FROM INSURANCE TRENDS REPORT

New types of products and services are available to Canadians through a growing number of channels and, increasingly, consumers are purchasing insurance tailor-made for their personal needs.

While traditional policy categories and annual commitments still exist, insurers are launching innovative forms of insurance that break the historic mould, such as insurance that you activate and deactivate as warranted or premiums based on your behaviour – demonstrated by data – instead of your demographic risk profile.

Digital monitoring technologies and connectivity are fuelling much of the transformation. “All the sensors and connected devices in our homes, vehicles and fitness devices are generating tremendous amounts of data, and data is the new gold,” says Doug Grant, partner at Insurance-Canada.ca Inc., an organization that provides independent information about technology and the business of insurance. “Using analytics and AI, you can understand your customer much better and make them offers or add products they tell you they want.”

This wealth of data is allowing insurance companies to be more proactive in risk management, says Mr. Grant. Examples include vehicle telematics that reward safe drivers and premium reductions for homeowners who install sensors that warn of dangerous water leaks.

“The traditional model was based on the understanding that if something goes wrong, I will indemnify you for the loss,” he says. “With this shift, the insurer is giving you tools to reduce your risk, and both parties benefit when insurance claims are reduced.”

Personalization of insurance is enabling new forms of usage-based policies. That principle motivated CAA Insurance to take a non-traditional approach with the launch of Canada’s first pay-as-you-go auto policy, CAA MyPace.

“Our goal is to give the motorists who rely on our insurance choice and control over how they benefit, based on their lifestyle and their stage of life,” says Matthew Turack, president, CAA Insurance. “MyPace is most beneficial for people who don’t drive very much maybe because they use public transit for work or are retired. Motorists pay in increments of 1,000 kilometres driven.”

Low-mileage drivers with this policy are saving an average of 40 per cent in premiums, says Mr. Turack.

CAA is also a big provider of travel insurance via its Orion Travel Insurance Company, and innovation is happening in that sphere as well. For example, the company’s emergency medical travel insurance now offers policyholders virtual health-care services. “We’re providing the opportunity for people who get a minor ailment while travelling to get telemedicine, linking with a physician through a secure video link. It is another customized offering that responds to consumer needs.”

In addition to technology changes, insurance providers are also responding to significant societal change. As VP of Emerging Business Models at The Co-operators, Peter Primdahl works to identify opportunities for new types of policies and delivery channels.

“The nature of work is changing with the ‘gig economy,’ and consuming is changing – moving away from ownership to access,” says Mr. Primdahl. “Changes in the ways we live are creating new risks, and by addressing these and facilitating participation in this economy, we hope to help people improve their financial security in this new era.”

We’re providing the opportunity for people who get a minor ailment while travelling to get telemedicine, linking with a physician through a secure video link. It is another customized offering that responds to consumer needs.

— Matthew Turack president, CAA Insurance

The other shift is the fact that consumers are always connected and expect their insurance providers to be the same, he says. “We are now focusing more than ever on how our clients interact with us. While we continue to manage our core business, we are exploring a ‘test and learn’ approach to new products – releasing them to clients and inviting their feedback, making improvements as requested.”

This more experimental approach led to creation of a suite of digital products called Duuo by The Co-operators, he says. “We developed the first digital on-demand policy in Canada for short-term rental housing, an activity typically not covered by regular homeowner’s insurance. Users can pop in and out of the coverage – turning it on before their guests arrive and having it automatically turn off when they leave.”

The Co-operators responded to client requests with another novel product: on demand Rent My Stuff insurance for people renting out their equipment. “We’re encouraging our customers to continue to tell us how we can refine more of our products and client experiences to align with their lives,” says Mr. Primdahl.

Source:

The Globe and Mail

More than just the valet was keeping an eye on Kerry Charbonneau’s truck while he was away on vacation.

Read more
DYK: Nearly half of Canadian drivers think vehicle safety technology poses a risk to road safety

DYK: Nearly half of Canadian drivers think vehicle safety technology poses a risk to road safety

Over-reliance on technology and lack of education cited as main factors

Toronto, ON, November 27, 2019 – Your vehicle brakes automatically to avoid a collision. It beeps to warn you if there is a car in your blind spot. The steering wheel vibrates if you unintentionally drift out of your lane or start crossing lanes without signalling. A light flashes to warn you of a risk of a frontal collision. These features are all designed to make driving safer, but nearly half of Canadian drivers also think they pose a risk to road safety, according to a recent survey released by Desjardins Insurance.Increasingly, vehicles on our roads are equipped with highly sophisticated safety features to prevent crashes or warn drivers of unsafe conditions. While a majority of drivers agree that these safety features are needed to make our roads safer (51%), the survey data suggests more needs to be done to ensure drivers not only understand what these features are meant to do, but also what they don’t guard against.

“While studies clearly show that crash avoidance and other safety systems in newer cars are reducing collisions and saving lives, the survey’s findings are enough to give us pause. They are an important reminder that no matter how sophisticated the safety systems, the driver’s vigilance and attention are essential to ensure safe driving, both for the people in the vehicle and those who share the road with motorists,” said Alain Hade, Vice-President, Marketing and Member Client Experience at Desjardins Insurance.

Among the survey’s highlights, it was found that:
  • 48% of drivers think vehicle safety technologies pose a risk to road safety
  • 46% of drivers think Canadian drivers are over-reliant on vehicle safety technologies
  • 80% think there should be more education on how to use safety features in vehicles
  • 63% of Canadians, drivers or not, feel advanced safety technology can contribute to distraction among drivers
However, the survey did reveal some positive points, including:
  • 52% of drivers believe vehicle safety features help reduce the number of collisions
  • 51% of drivers feel vehicle safety features are needed to keep our roads safer

“It’s important that driver knowledge of safety features and confidence in them is on the rise, particularly as they are exposed to features that are increasingly standard on new vehicles,” said Robyn Robertson, President and CEO of the Traffic Injury Research Foundation. “Caution is warranted in the promotion of safety features and their benefits to ensure Canadians understand the functionality and limitations of them, and to discourage drivers from relying on them in situations for which they were not designed.”

Are we ready for autonomous vehicles?
With most car manufacturers expected to unveil semi- or fully autonomous vehicles in the not-too-distant future, it is clear Canadians are somewhat reluctant to fully embrace the technology. According to survey results, less than a third of Canadians who expressed an opinion on that matter (28%) say they would trust being driven in a fully autonomous vehicle.

“These results lead us to believe that people experienced with the technology have confidence in vehicle safety systems, but not blindly,” added Hade. “Drivers need to be well informed about the car they’re driving before getting behind the wheel. This means knowing what the features and technology can and cannot do. Safety technologies are important to prevent injuries and fatalities, but they also have limitations.”

Impact on insurance
Half (52%) believe the safety systems help reduce the number of crashes; however, they rely on costly electronic components and sensors that also have a direct impact on the cost of repairing a vehicle. Between 2009 and 2016, the average cost of a two-vehicle collision (at-fault and not-at-fault) jumped 30%.

Fiat 500 Recalled for Transmission Issue

50,000 cars with automatic transmissions affected, may roll away when put into Park

By Jon Linkov | www.consumerreports.org

More than 50,000 Fiat 500 hatchbacks from the 2012 and 2013 model years are being recalled because their automatic transmissions may not properly shift into Park, so the car could roll away and crash into another car or an object. The issue may even make it impossible for the driver to shift into or out of Park, Drive, Reverse, or Neutral.

The problem stems from a faulty part within the transmission, which Fiat will repair at no cost to vehicle owners. Fiat says it is aware of three crashes and zero injuries related to this issue.

The Details

Vehicles recalled: Certain Fiat 500 hatchbacks with automatic transmissions manufactured from December 2, 2010 through January 30, 2013.

The problem: The connector at the end of the cable that joins the shift lever to the transmission, called a transmission cable bushing, can deteriorate. If it fails, drivers may notice that it’s significantly easier to move the shift lever, and that the shift lever may not show the same gear position that the vehicle is in.

The fix: Fiat dealers will replace the transmission cable bushing with a new one made of a more durable material.

How to contact the manufacturer: Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCA), the parent company of Fiat, will begin notifying owners of affected vehicles in January 2020. Owners may also contact FCA customer service at 1-800-853-1403. Fiat’s own number for this recall is VB4.

NHTSA campaign number: 19V817

Check to see whether your vehicle has an open recall: NHTSA’s website will tell you whether your vehicle has a recall that needs to be addressed.

If you plug your car’s 17-digit vehicle identification number (VIN) into NHTSA’s website and a recall doesn’t appear, it means your vehicle doesn’t currently have one. Because automakers issue recalls often, and for many older vehicles, we recommend checking back regularly.

 

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