OACP team up with IBC & Accident Support Services International to stop thefts & valuables left in plain view

HAMILTON, ON, Dec. 4, 2019 /CNW/ – Ontario’s police leaders are teaming up with the Insurance Bureau of Canada (IBC) and Accident Support Services International to warn motorists to Lock it OR Lose it when it comes to securing their vehicles and valuables this holiday season.

The Ontario Association of Chiefs of Police (OACP) has launched its annual Lock It OR Lose It campaign, which encourages drivers and passengers to take precautions to protect their vehicles and contents from theft, particularly during the holiday season. The campaign was kicked off at the Lime Ridge Mall in Hamilton.

“The holiday season should be about spending time with our families and friends. Our message is simple: don’t let would-be thieves play the role of Bad Santa by stealing your vehicle or valuables left unsecured. Keep things such as GPS and mobile devices, laptops, shopping bags, money, and credit cards out-of-sight as a way in deter criminal activities.” said OACP President Chief Paul Pedersen.

This year’s Lock it OR Lose it campaign is being launched during the holiday season because it’s easy for people to be distracted and leave their vehicles unlocked or valuables in plain sight during the festive hustle-and-bustle. Police will use Lock it OR Lose it notices throughout the year as part of on-going crime prevention efforts.

“About 236 motor vehicles are stolen in Canada every day. That’s 86,132 incidents per year. In Ontario alone, almost 24,000 vehicles were reported stolen,” Bryan Gast, the IBC’s National Director, Investigative Services. “Although we’ve seen increases in recent years, the rate of motor vehicle theft in Canada last year was 38% lower than in 2008. But it doesn’t mean we can drop our guard. In fact, we need to be more vigilant than ever.”

According to Gast, today’s auto thieves are turning to technology – and vehicles’ electronic systems – to bypass security systems and steal vehicles. Electronic auto theft is on the rise as more vehicles are equipped with technology such as keyless entry fobs. In fact, the insurance industry has seen the growing trend that thieves are able to copy FOB information and steal cars right from your driveway.

During local Lock it OR Lose it outreach initiatives by police services throughout the year, police officers, auxiliary officers, and crime prevention personnel examine parked vehicles to confirm they are locked and that no valuables are left in plain view. A small notice is placed on vehicles checked – not just ones that are found unsecured – advising what safety precautions may have been neglected and offering simple prevention tips for drivers to protect their vehicles against theft. The notices congratulate drivers who have secured their vehicle.

Motorists are urged not to keep personal documents such as vehicle ownership, liability pink slips, credit card invoices or other documents containing personal information in their vehicles. Identity thieves are looking for such documents so they can assume identities, secure credit card accounts, lease vehicles for export, and even take out a mortgage against victims’ properties without their knowledge.

#LockItOrLoseIt

The Lock it OR Lose it Campaign is supported by a number of OACP partners:

Accident Support Services International

arrive alive/DRIVE SOBER

Insurance Bureau of Canada

The OACP also supports arrive alive/Drive Safe’s  #HolidayRide Campaign http://www.arrivealive.org/

SOURCE Insurance Bureau of Canada

www.ibc.ca

These are the 10 most stolen vehicles in Canada

These are the 10 most stolen vehicles in Canada

Jackie Dunham | CTVNews.ca 

TORONTO — Owners of Ford F-series pickup trucks should take extra care to lock their vehicles because it appears they’re a primary target for thieves.

Once again, Ford F250 and F350 trucks from the 2000s topped the Insurance Bureau of Canada’s annual ranking of the most stolen vehicles in Canada. In 2019, Ford pickup trucks took up eight of the top 10 spots on the list with the 2007 Ford F-350 claiming the unenviable title of most stolen vehicle for the year.

It’s unsurprising news for anyone who has been following the IBC’s annual ranking, which is based on insurance claims data collected from “nearly all” automobile insurance companies in Canada. Ford pickup trucks have consistently dominated the list since it began in 2003.

According to the IBC, Ford pickup trucks are prime targets because they lack ignition immobilizers, which are devices that can prevent thieves from hot-wiring them.

“The lack of an ignition immobilizer is the number one reason this series of Ford trucks continues to take up the majority of spots on the list,” the association said in a press release Tuesday.

Interestingly, the Ford pickup trucks featured on the list were earlier models from before 2008 when new safety technology was installed in the vehicles.

As some of the most popular vehicles on the road, the prevalence of Ford pickup trucks in Canada, particularly in provinces such as Alberta, also contributed to the high rate of theft.

THE TOP 10 MOST STOLEN VEHICLES IN CANADA IN 2019

  • Ford 350SD AWD 2007
  • Ford 350SD AWD 2006
  • Ford 350SD AWD 2005
  • Ford 350SD AWD 2004
  • Ford 250SD AWD 2006
  • Ford 350SD AWD 2003
  • Lexus RX350/RX350L/RX450h/RX450hL 4DR AWD 2018
  • Ford F250 SD 4WD 2005
  • Ford F350 SD 4AWD 2002
  • Honda Civic Si 2DR Coupe 1998

With auto thefts costing Canadians close to $1 billion each year, the IBC warns that thieves are becoming more sophisticated and using new technology to bypass security systems and electronically gain access to vehicles.

According to the bureau’s findings, technology had a “major impact” on vehicle thefts in 2019.

“Electronic auto theft is on the rise across the country as more vehicles are equipped with technology like keyless entry fobs,” said Bryan Gast, the national director of investigative services at IBC.

The IBC said thieves can use wireless transmitters to intercept the signal from keyless entry fobs and open a locked vehicle’s door.

TIPS TO PREVENT VEHICLE FRAUD

To protect your vehicle, the IBC advises owners to avoid leaving their keyless entry fob in a vehicle or in an unprotected area near the entrance of your home.

If you want to leave your fob near the front door, the IBC said to place it in a protective box or bag that blocks the signal instead of in an exposed bowl or on a hallway table.

Additionally, if your vehicle isn’t already equipped with one, consider installing an immobilizing device to prevent thieves from hot-wiring it.

The IBC said Canadians should install a tracking device in their vehicles that can emit a signal to police or a monitoring station if a theft occurs.

OTHER TIPS

  • Don’t leave the vehicle running while it’s unattended
  • Lock the doors and close all windows when it’s parked
  • Make sure to park in well-lit areas or in a garage
  • Use a visible or audio device to alert potential thieves that the vehicle is protected
  • Consider using a steering wheel or brake pedal lock as a deterrent
  • Avoid leaving personal information, such as insurance or ownership details, in the glove box when the vehicle is left alone

Canada: What To Know About Left-Turn Accidents

Article by Gluckstein Personal Injury Lawyers

What to know about left-turn accidents

Traffic accidents always come down to a blame game and the person making the left turn is often in the wrong. About half of all crashes at Canadian intersections involved a vehicle that was turning left, according to a 2007 joint study by the Traffic Injury Research Foundation and the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.

With so many claims stemming from those incidents, the Insurance Bureau of Canada considers all left turns into traffic that lead to an accident, as against insurance company policy.

Before trying to beat the light and making an ill-advised left turn, here are some things drivers should consider:

Different types of insurance

Insurance companies always deem someone at fault in cases of accidents. The fault could be partial or full depending on the circumstances. Individuals deal with their own insurance companies, regardless of who caused the accident. No-fault insurance allows a person to receive part or full coverage by their company regardless of who caused the accident. They can receive medical and other benefits without having to track down the other driver and take them to court. They are also eligible even if they are deemed to have caused the accident.

Proving who’s at fault

Insurance companies determine fault by analyzing accident reports. Therefore, if the other driver committed a traffic violation as well, such as speeding or running a red light, there is room for adjustment. Adjusters can “split the fault” in these situations, instead of the full liability for the driver turning left.

As a driver, proving what happened at the time of the accident is crucial in determining your eligibility for an insurance claim. First-hand witness accounts are helpful in constructing the scene before and after the accident.

An impartial witness is ideal to corroborate your story, especially if you claim that the other driver was at fault.

The content of this article is intended to provide a general guide to the subject matter. Specialist advice should be sought about your specific circumstances.

Source: Mondaq

These are the 10 most stolen cars in Quebec this year

Basem Boshra CTV News Montreal

MONTREAL — The Insurance Bureau of Canda has released its annual list of the most stolen cars in Canada, and in Quebec, the Top 10 list consists of just two makes: Lexus and Toyota.

According to the IBC, these are the 10 most stolen cars in Quebec in 2019:

  1. 2018 Lexus RX350/RX350L/RX450h/RX450hL 4DR AWD
  2. 2018 Lexus NX300/NX300h 4DR AWD
  3. 2017 Lexus RX350/RX450h 4DR AWD
  4. 2016 Lexus RX350/RX450h 4DR AWD
  5. 2017 Toyota HIGHLANDER 4DR 4WD
  6. 2018 Toyota HIGHLANDER 4DR 4WD
  7. 2015 Toyota PRIUS V 5DR
  8. 2017 Lexus NX200t/NX300h 4DR AWD
  9. 2015 Lexus NX200t/NX300h 4DR AWD
  10. 2016 Toyota Highlander 4DR 4WDd

 

Technology & societal changes driving unprecedented customization for consumers

Welcome to the era of ultra-personalized insurance.

CONTENT FROM INSURANCE TRENDS REPORT

New types of products and services are available to Canadians through a growing number of channels and, increasingly, consumers are purchasing insurance tailor-made for their personal needs.

While traditional policy categories and annual commitments still exist, insurers are launching innovative forms of insurance that break the historic mould, such as insurance that you activate and deactivate as warranted or premiums based on your behaviour – demonstrated by data – instead of your demographic risk profile.

Digital monitoring technologies and connectivity are fuelling much of the transformation. “All the sensors and connected devices in our homes, vehicles and fitness devices are generating tremendous amounts of data, and data is the new gold,” says Doug Grant, partner at Insurance-Canada.ca Inc., an organization that provides independent information about technology and the business of insurance. “Using analytics and AI, you can understand your customer much better and make them offers or add products they tell you they want.”

This wealth of data is allowing insurance companies to be more proactive in risk management, says Mr. Grant. Examples include vehicle telematics that reward safe drivers and premium reductions for homeowners who install sensors that warn of dangerous water leaks.

“The traditional model was based on the understanding that if something goes wrong, I will indemnify you for the loss,” he says. “With this shift, the insurer is giving you tools to reduce your risk, and both parties benefit when insurance claims are reduced.”

Personalization of insurance is enabling new forms of usage-based policies. That principle motivated CAA Insurance to take a non-traditional approach with the launch of Canada’s first pay-as-you-go auto policy, CAA MyPace.

“Our goal is to give the motorists who rely on our insurance choice and control over how they benefit, based on their lifestyle and their stage of life,” says Matthew Turack, president, CAA Insurance. “MyPace is most beneficial for people who don’t drive very much maybe because they use public transit for work or are retired. Motorists pay in increments of 1,000 kilometres driven.”

Low-mileage drivers with this policy are saving an average of 40 per cent in premiums, says Mr. Turack.

CAA is also a big provider of travel insurance via its Orion Travel Insurance Company, and innovation is happening in that sphere as well. For example, the company’s emergency medical travel insurance now offers policyholders virtual health-care services. “We’re providing the opportunity for people who get a minor ailment while travelling to get telemedicine, linking with a physician through a secure video link. It is another customized offering that responds to consumer needs.”

In addition to technology changes, insurance providers are also responding to significant societal change. As VP of Emerging Business Models at The Co-operators, Peter Primdahl works to identify opportunities for new types of policies and delivery channels.

“The nature of work is changing with the ‘gig economy,’ and consuming is changing – moving away from ownership to access,” says Mr. Primdahl. “Changes in the ways we live are creating new risks, and by addressing these and facilitating participation in this economy, we hope to help people improve their financial security in this new era.”

We’re providing the opportunity for people who get a minor ailment while travelling to get telemedicine, linking with a physician through a secure video link. It is another customized offering that responds to consumer needs.

— Matthew Turack president, CAA Insurance

The other shift is the fact that consumers are always connected and expect their insurance providers to be the same, he says. “We are now focusing more than ever on how our clients interact with us. While we continue to manage our core business, we are exploring a ‘test and learn’ approach to new products – releasing them to clients and inviting their feedback, making improvements as requested.”

This more experimental approach led to creation of a suite of digital products called Duuo by The Co-operators, he says. “We developed the first digital on-demand policy in Canada for short-term rental housing, an activity typically not covered by regular homeowner’s insurance. Users can pop in and out of the coverage – turning it on before their guests arrive and having it automatically turn off when they leave.”

The Co-operators responded to client requests with another novel product: on demand Rent My Stuff insurance for people renting out their equipment. “We’re encouraging our customers to continue to tell us how we can refine more of our products and client experiences to align with their lives,” says Mr. Primdahl.

Source:

The Globe and Mail

More than just the valet was keeping an eye on Kerry Charbonneau’s truck while he was away on vacation.

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