Kanetix.ca survey finds a positive shift in consumer attitude towards hybrid and
electric vehicle use

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Turo: It’s like AirBnB for car owners and there’s money to be made

Pioneering car rental marketplace Turo announces today its launch into Canada, marking its first expansion outside of the US. Empowering Canadians to turn their idle cars into earning engines and inject more personality and value into the car rental experience, Turo is the first peer-to-peer car rental company in Canada.

Putting Canada’s 23 million vehicles to better use, Turo allows car owners to offset the cost of car ownership by renting their idle vehicles to pre-approved travellers, while helping travellers find the perfect vehicle for their next adventure. Cars rented on Turo typically cost 30 per cent less than traditional car rentals. Members of the Turo community pay no membership fees, and each trip is backed by Turo’s leading trust and safety protections, including $2 million in auto liability insurance and 24-hour roadside assistance.

“This is a significant milestone in our history; our first international launch and the opportunity to make car ownership and travel inCanada more accessible,” said Turo CEO, Andre Haddad. “The average compact car costs $9,500 per year to maintain. For the first time, Canadians can earn money from their cars and help fuel travellers’ adventures, all while being part of a vibrant community. It’s a significant step towards realizing our mission of putting the world’s one billion cars to better use.”

Customers of Intact Financial Corporation’s two largest brands, Intact Insurance and belairdirect, are eligible to list their vehicles on the Turo platform. Both insurance providers have modified their guidelines to allow customers to join the Turo community.

“We’re excited to offer Intact Insurance and belairdirect customers Canada’s first peer-to-peer car rental insurance option. Turo’s rental platform will offer consumers greater choice,” said Karim Hirji, Senior Vice-President, International & Ventures, Intact Financial Corporation. “As a customer-driven organization, Intact remains committed to designing unique insurance products to meet the evolving needs of Canadians.”

Turo operates in Alberta, Ontario and Quebec and will expand its marketplace nationally. At launch, Intact Insurance and belairdirect personal lines automobile policyholders will be eligible to list their cars on this new peer-to-peer car rental marketplace. Customers must speak to their broker or agent before participating. Turo is working to prompt other Canadian insurers to allow their policyholders to enjoy the benefits of renting out their cars on the marketplace as well.

Turo, founded in 2009 and headquartered in San Francisco, has grown to operate in over 2,500 cities and 300 airports in North Americaand has safely facilitated over 1 million rental days to date. The average active US member makes USD $600 per month renting out a car in the marketplace.

About Turo

Turo is a car rental marketplace where local car owners provide travellers with the perfect vehicle for their next adventure. Across the country or across town, travellers choose from a unique selection of nearby cars, while car owners earn extra money and help fuel the adventures of travellers from around the world. A pioneer of the sharing economy and travel industry, Turo is a safe, supportive community where the car you rent is part of a story, not a fleet. Whether it’s an F-150 truck to help out on moving day, a Tesla for a luxurious weekend away or a classic VW bus for a picture-perfect road trip, travellers rent the car and own the adventure. Discover Turo at turo.com.

SOURCE www.turo.com

Canadians Don’t Trust Autonomous Vehicles, Yet

CAA

Canadians are wary of driverless cars, according to research released by the Canadian Automobile Association (CAA) on the eve of a major conference looking at the future of autonomous vehicles.

Nearly two-thirds (63 per cent) of Canadians say they would not trust a vehicle to drive itself while they are in it, stating concerns such as vehicle hacking, theft of data generated by the vehicle, and accountability in the event of an accident.

Despite their doubts today, Canadians still believe there are benefits to driverless cars in the future, such as improved accessibility for people with mobility issues and fewer road safety incidents due to reduced human error. In fact, more than half (57 per cent) of Canadians say they think this technology will advance to a point where they would fully trust a driverless car in the next 10 years.

“Canadians clearly see the potential. We are just not there yet. Conferences like this one will help advance the dialogue around the pros and cons of this new technology,” says Jeff Walker, Vice-President of Public Affairs for CAA National. “Wherever the debate leads, CAA will be there to make sure the views of the driving public are well represented.”

The public opinion research was done in conjunction with the Conference Board of Canada’s conference, Automated Vehicles: Planning the Next Disruptive Technology, being held tomorrow and Wednesday in Toronto. CAA, which is sponsoring the conference, will also moderate a panel on the privacy considerations surrounding driverless cars on Tuesday at 2:45 p.m.

The results are based on a survey of 2,090 representative Canadians, conducted between March 23 and March 30, 2016. A probability sample of the same size would yield a margin of error of ±2.2%, 19 times out of 20.

CAA is a federation of nine clubs providing over 6.2 million Members with exceptional emergency roadside service, complete automotive and travel services, member savings and comprehensive insurance services. CAA also advocates on issues of concern to its members, including road safety, the environment, mobility, infrastructure and consumer protection.

SOURCE Canadian Automobile Association

If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses.

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Ford F 150 gets highest rating in new insurance crash tests

By Dee-Ann Durbin

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

DETROIT _ The 2016 Ford F-150 is the only full-size pickup truck to score the top rating in new front crash tests performed by the insurance industry.

Rival pickups from Chevrolet, GMC, Ram and Toyota didn’t fare as well, according to results released Tuesday by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.

The institute evaluated 2016 models in a small overlap crash test, which replicates what happens when a vehicle runs off the road and a portion of its front end hits a tree or a pole at 40 miles per hour.

The tests evaluated both crew cab and extended cab versions of each truck, since those are the most popular body styles. A crew cab has four full doors and two full rows of seating. An extended cab has two full front doors, two small rear doors and smaller second-row seats.

The institute also evaluated different body styles because past tests have shown varying results. In tests last year, the 2015 F-150 SuperCab the extended cab version of the F-150 lacked some of the structural elements of the larger F-150 SuperCrew so it got lower safety ratings.

Ford responded by adding reinforcements to the 2016 SuperCab, including high-strength steel tubes in the wheel wells and aluminum rocker panels on the sides that help absorb energy from a crash. Ford also added nylon reinforcements to the door hinges. With those enhancements, both versions of the F-150 now have the institute’s highest safety rating of “good.”

The results were a vindication for Ford Motor Co., which switched to a lightweight aluminum body on the F-150 in the 2015 model year in order to increase fuel economy. Ford was the first automaker to move away from a steel body on its pickups, and some had questioned whether aluminum would perform as well.

Crash test results varied for other brands. The extended cab versions of the Chevrolet Silverado, GMC Sierra and Toyota Tundra, for example, all performed better than the larger crew cab versions. But the institute said all of them failed to protect the crash test dummy’s lower leg and foot. None got the highest safety rating.

Toyota Motor Corp. is evaluating the results, spokeswoman Cindy Knight said. She stressed that the Tundra meets or exceeds all federal safety requirements. The institute performs a different set of tests than federal regulators.

Both versions of the Ram pickup were the worst performers on the small overlap test. The institute said the trucks had a poor structure and the force of the crash pushed the instrument panel and steering wheel back toward the dummy. A message seeking comment was left with Fiat Chrysler.

The institute also tested roof strength to see how well the pickups would protect an occupant in a rollover crash. Roof strength is especially critical for pickup trucks, since studies have shown that pickup drivers are less likely to wear seat belts. A crushed roof can break window glass and doors and make it more likely that an unbelted occupant will be thrown from the vehicle.

The F-150, both Silverados, both Sierras and the Tundra Double Cab the extended version of the Tundra all got the highest ratings for roof strength. The Tundra CrewMax crew cab and both Rams got lower ratings.

The institute said it plans to test two more full-size pickup trucks, the Nissan Titan and the Honda Ridgeline, later this year after both are redesigned.

canada-press

Limit short term rentals, screen all drivers says new sharing economy report

TORONTO _ A new report on the sharing economy suggests governments should screen drivers on platforms such as Uber and limit what kinds of homes can be rented on sites like Airbnb.

In creating the report, research group MaRS Solutions Lab interviewed more than 136 people including taxi drivers, uberX drivers, hotel managers and Airbnb hosts.

Officials from the Ontario and Toronto governments also contributed to the report.

The report makes a series of recommendations for how to effectively regulate the sharing economy.

One of the recommendations says residents should only be allowed to rent out their primary residences _ and not secondary or commercial residences on home-sharing websites like Airbnb for a maximum of 180 days a year.

The report also suggests that every driver should be screened and every vehicle inspected and insured, even if those drivers are operating on platforms like the ride-hailing app, Uber.

Driver training should also be revamped, to compensate for differences in the kinds of training that taxi drivers and Uber drivers receive.

“When it comes to introducing regulation for the sharing economy, governments should not only look at regulating new entrants, but should also revisit current regulations to reduce burden for existing operators,” Joeri van den Steenhoven, the director of MaRS Solutions Lab, said in a statement.

canada-press

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