My leased car was in an accident. Do I have to keep making payments?

My leased car was in an accident. Do I have to keep making payments?

Within a month of taking possession of my car on lease, it was in an accident. I informed the insurer and the car company within hours – but I am shocked to see that Canadian Dealer Lease Services is still deducting payments from my account. When contacted, it informed me that the lease is active and it will keep deducting payments. Is this correct practice? I don’t have a car now. – Samuel

After a crash, payments don’t stop just because your car can’t go.

If your car is in the repair shop, you have to keep paying your financing or lease payments until it’s fixed and you can drive it again.

In other words, it’s not your bank’s or finance company’s problem – you’re the one dealing with the insurance company. If your policy allows it, you might get a rental car.

“In the case of vehicle damage, the consumer who has taken out the policy would submit a claim to fix the vehicle,” said Pete Karageorgos, Ontario director of consumer and industry relations with the Insurance Bureau of Canada (IBC), in an e-mail. “There may be coverage for renting a vehicle while the owner’s vehicle is being repaired – the owner’s insurance policy would extend to cover the rental vehicle.”

Total responsibility?

And if the crash totals your car? You’ll keep making normal lease payments until the claim is settled.

“Lease payments will continue from the date of loss until Canadian Dealer Lease Services receives the agreed settlement cheque from the insurance company,” said Andre Safah, manager, client services with Canadian Dealers Lease Services, in an e-mail. “At that point, all lease payments that were paid after the date of loss will be refunded to the lessee less any deductible amount under the policy and no further payments will be deducted.”

After the settlement, the leasing company might consider it case closed.

“We will accept the proceeds of insurance, provided there is no denial of coverage in whole or in part and the lessee is not in default in paying any amount due to us,” Safah said.

But you could end up owing money after the settlement, depending on your lease or loan agreement.

“Usually, your insurance company will pay your lease financing company the market value of the vehicle directly,” Lynne Santerre, spokeswoman with the Financial Consumer Agency of Canada, said in an e-mail. “If the insurance payout is less than the amount you owe on your car lease, then you are responsible for paying that difference.”

For example, if your insurance company decides the replacement value of your car is $10,000 but you still owe $16,000 on your loan or lease, you’d have to cover the $6,000 shortfall, Santerre said.

“GAP (Guaranteed Auto Protection) insurance will usually cover this difference and pay the remaining balance you still owe on your lease,” Santerre said. “Many finance companies require GAP insurance as part of the lease, while others offer it as an option.”

Lease of your worries?

When leasing or financing a vehicle, read through the agreement so you can understand what you’re responsible for, Karageorgos said.

“If leased or financed, the name of the leasing or financing company would be included on the application for insurance and on the policy as having an interest in the vehicle,” he said.

“Your obligations could include everything from mileage to condition of the vehicle at the end of the lease period, and possibly specifications as to how repairs to the vehicle are completed following a crash.”

Yield for pedestrians, respect the crosswalk, and wear your helmet

Police issued 12 tickets during April’s traffic safety focus on pedestrians, cyclists and motorists.

There were:

  • Seven tickets for drivers failing to yield or stop for pedestrians, or passing a vehicle that is stopped for a pedestrian.
  • Four tickets for pedestrians disobeying crosswalk signals, or walking into the path of a vehicle.
  • 1 ticket for a motorcyclist failing to wear a helmet.

In addition, police reported 5,025 speeding/aggressive driving offences, 294 impaired driving-related offences, 320 distracted driving offences (251 of those for cellphone use) and 295 seatbelt/car seat/booster seat violations in April1.

With temperatures rising, more people will be taking advantage of the warm weather. Motorists should remember to #LookOut for those who are out walking and riding. Pedestrians, cyclists and motorists are reminded to stay alert and walk, bike, and ride with caution. They are also reminded to obey the rules of the road, and not take their right of way for granted.

View more information on vulnerable road users, including tips for sharing the road and guidelines around required gear for new motorcyclists.

And remember to #DriveSober, Saskatchewan! Police remain focused on impaired driving throughout May. Watch SGI’s new impaired driving prevention commercial and read about the 12 real Saskatchewan people it features at sgi.sk.ca/disappear.

Follow SGI on Facebook and Twitter for safety tips to #TakeCareOutThere.

B.C.’s Graduated Licensing Program – New Driver Licence Restrictions

New Driver SignsB.C.’s Graduated Licensing Program (GLP) was implemented to develop driving skills in a safe, step by step manner. Today, they are a widely accepted, effective safety measure. The systems that have been evaluated have been found to be very effective in reducing crashes and injuries, and public acceptance is high.

In the beginning a driver earns a Learner Driver licence that is subject to a set of restrictions that mandates the presence of an instructor and sets passenger restrictions to reduce the possibility of distractions. There are hours of the day restrictions as well, although midnight to 5:00 am is probably a time when most of them are sound asleep by personal choice.

After a year of practice with a supervisor and passing a road test the GLP Learner becomes a Novice and restrictions are relaxed in comparison to the Learner. A passenger restriction of one person applies unless the Novice is accompanied by an instructor.

In the case of both the Learner and the Novice restrictions of zero blood alcohol, prohibition on the use of electronic devices while drivingand the requirement to display a new driver sign apply.

After passing another road test, the successful Novice will be issued a full privilege driver’s licence. Of course, any driver may be the subject of restrictions if there is a need for them. Examples of these restrictions include such things a the requirement to wear corrective lenses or to be fitted with a prosthesis or leg brace. This document lists the possible restrictions on page 115.

At the onset of the GLP program new drivers who disobeyed any of the restrictions were ticketed under section 25(15) of the Motor Vehicle Act. A conviction carried both a fine and penalty points.

As new drivers are subject to lower thresholds for prohibition from accumulated penalty points there was soon a large number of new drivers who had lost their licences for failing to display new driver signs. The solution was to implement division 30.13 and later division 30.10 in the Motor Vehicle Act Regulations which did not result in penalty points for failing to display, only fines.

Police were encouraged to use the new regulation for driver sign violators instead of section 25(15).

Of B.C.’s 3.3 million licenced drivers, over a quarter million of them are Learner or Novice drivers. That’s about 1 in 12. I suspect that we should be seeing more new driver signs displayed on vehicles around us as we drive.

Of course that depends on who you ask. There are many opinions about the display of new driver signs, including some well qualified people who feel that the N sign should not be required.

This article was actually prompted by the inquiry from a friend whose teenaged daughter asked him for permission to ride with friends contrary to their licence restrictions. He refused to give her permission and began to search for what the repercussions would be if she did not follow the rules thinking that they would be serious ones.

Really, the worst thing that can happen aside from a ticket under 25(15) for the driver is having the police prohibit the driver from proceeding until licence conditions are met. He could receive a telephone summons to come and pick up his daughter from the side of the highway.

Many of our problems on the highway result from people who treat the rules as something to follow as long as it is convenient. If it isn’t convenient, they do as they please. Sadly, this lesson is one that is passed down easily and followed without further thought by new drivers.

Link:

Plug’n Drive launches the world’s first Electric Vehicle Discovery Centre in Toronto

Today, representatives from the Ontario cabinet, utilities and organized labour officially opened the Plug’n Drive Electric Vehicle Discovery Centre in northern Toronto. It’s the world’s first experiential learning facility dedicated to electric vehicle (EV) education and awareness – and it’s completely free for consumers.

Electric Vehicle Discovery Centre Official Ribbon Cut – May 17, 2017

“The EV Discovery Centre will serve as an EV hub for consumers throughout Ontario and for visitors from around the world,” Cara Clairman, President and CEO of Plug’n Drive said. “We are providing a one-stop-shop where consumers can explore and test-drive the latest EV models – alongside charging solutions at home and on the road.”

Ontario’s Climate Change Action Plan aims to expand EV sales to 5 per cent of all new vehicles sold by 2020. The EV Discovery Centre is a key component in accomplishing this goal.

“We are investing proceeds from Ontario’s carbon market into Plug’n Drive’s Electric Vehicle Discovery Centre to encourage more Ontarians to make the switch to low-carbon transportation and reduce their greenhouse gas emissions,” Minister Glen Murray added. “As part of Ontario’s Climate Change Action, we are helping to tackle emissions from the transportation sector, which is the single-largest source of greenhouse gas emissions in the province.”

The EVDC is a learning centre that provides visitors with the knowledge they need to consider an EV for their next vehicle purchase. After visitors have expressed interest, the EVDC will refer them to an EV-certified dealership in their area.

“Our research shows that Ontario needs effective EV education and awareness raising initiatives, such as Plug’n Drive’s EV Discovery Centre, to speed up EV sales,” Clairman concluded. “EVs are fast, dependable and affordable – and they are a key part of a low carbon future for the region and beyond.”

About the EV Discovery Centre

The centre is a public-private partnership between Plug’n Drive, the Province of Ontario, TD Bank Group, Ontario Power Generation(OPG), Power Workers’ Union (PWU), Toronto Hydro and Bruce Power. Located at 1126 Finch Avenue West in North York, the centre features:

  • Indoor showcase of the latest EV models and charging stations from leading manufacturers
  • Toronto Hydro powered: Four public charging stations in the test drive zone
  • PWU sponsored interactive digital displays to engage consumers on EV technology, Ontario’s electricity sector, climate change and other related topics
  • The OPG Power Place: training facility for corporate and stakeholder engagement events for up to 100 people sponsored by Ontario Power Generation
  • Bruce Power Coffee Bar: complimentary for visitors surrounded by educational exhibits on home charging
  • TD Zone offering information on EV exclusive financing and insurance options

About Plug’n Drive
Plug’n Drive is a non-profit organization committed to accelerating the adoption of electric vehicles to maximize their environmental and economic benefits.

SOURCE Plug’n Drive

For further information: Media contact: Brian Millar, Plug’n Drive, 647-717-6941 (day), 647-780-6806 (night), brian@plugndrive.ca

Road Trip Checklist For This Long Weekend

Road Trip Checklist For This Long Weekend

By Jeff Youngs | JD Powers

Before setting off on a road trip, it is important to make sure that your vehicle is ready for a long journey, especially if your route passes through lightly populated areas off of the Interstate. Checking your vehicle’s basic functions and systems before departure can help to ensure a safe and smooth road trip.

  • Check the brakes. Your vehicle’s brakes are a critical component for any drive, whether heading across town or across the country. Make sure your car’s brakes are in good condition before your trip.
  • Check the tires. In addition to making sure you have a spare tire with you (unless your car has run-flat tires), be sure to inflate all tires, including the spare, to the recommended tire pressure before departure. Also, check for uneven tread wear, which indicates that an alignment or replacement tires might be necessary.
  • Check the lights and signals. Make sure your headlights, tail lights, brake lights and turn signals work properly.
  • Check the wiper blades and washer fluid. A new set of wiper blades is a good investment before any road trip. Also, be sure to top off your washer fluid before hitting the highway.
  • Check the engine coolant. If your engine coolant is old, it’s a good idea to replace it with new coolant. Be sure that your car is ready for extreme heat or extreme cold, depending on where you’re going and the time of year.
  • Check the fans, belts and hoses. Your car’s engine fan, belts and hoses are critical for engine cooling, so be sure they’re in good condition before your trip.
  • Check the battery. It’s easy to have your battery tested to make sure it’s ready for a road trip. If your battery is more than 3 years old, get it checked before departure.
  • Check the fluids. Make sure your car’s fluids are in good condition and are topped off. This includes the oil, transmission fluid, brake fluid, and the power steering fluid.
  • Bring basic tools. Make sure all of your vehicle’s tire-change tools are present and accounted for. Additionally, it’s not a bad idea to bring a basic set of tools that could help fix a minor problem during the trip.
  • Bring emergency provisions. Even if you perform every task on this road trip checklist, you could become stranded with a disabled vehicle. You will want to have emergency provisions aboard just in case this happens. Food and water are critical, but depending on the weather, you will also want appropriate clothing and accessories, like sunscreen and a wide-brimmed hat for hot sunny areas or a blanket for cold regions.
ICBC urges: Slow down this Victoria Day long weekend

ICBC urges: Slow down this Victoria Day long weekend

As B.C. roads are expected to be busy with the unofficial start of the summer road trip season this May long weekend, ICBC and police are asking drivers to slow down and maintain a safe speed now and throughout summer.

Crashes and injuries increase on long weekends because of many factors, including unsafe speed as people may be rushing to reach their destination. Last year over the Victoria Day long weekend, 490 people were hurt in 1,900 crashes in B.C.

That’s why ICBC and police are launching an education and enforcement campaign to tie in with Victoria Day weekend. Province-wide police will be out on B.C. roads targeting high-risk driving behaviours and Speed Watch volunteers will be set up in communities across B.C. to encourage drivers to slow down.

Here are ICBC’s top driving tips to keep you safe this long weekend and all summer:

  • Let others into your lane: Don’t speed up as someone is trying to pass you. Help the other driver get into your lane by slowing down and making room.

  • Slow down: Posted speed limits are intended for ideal conditions. On uneven or wet roads, and in bad weather conditions, slow down and increase your following distance to at least four seconds.

  • Plan ahead: Allow extra time to get to your destination. Avoid rushing by planning your route in advance. Be realistic about your travel time. If you’re going to be later than expected, be patient and accept the delay.

  • Scan intersections: The majority of crashes involving pedestrians, cyclists and motorcyclists happen in intersections, so it’s important to approach all intersections cautiously.

  • Prepare your vehicle: Make sure your vehicle’s ready for the trip. Don’t drive with badly worn or under-inflated tires. Keep the wiper fluid topped up for clearer visibility.

  • Watch for other road users: As the days get longer and the weather gets nicer, pay extra attention to pedestrians, cyclists and motorcyclists.

  • Leave your phone alone: No call or text is worth risking your life or the lives of others. Remember using a phone at a stop light is prohibited. If you have to take a call, pull over when it’s safe; stay focused on the road and keep the conversation brief. Make sure you’re focused on driving before re-entering traffic.

Regional statistics*:

  • Last year, 330 people were injured in 1,200 crashes throughout the Lower Mainland over the Victoria Day long weekend.
  • Last year, 52 people were injured in 290 crashes throughout the Vancouver Island over the Victoria Day long weekend.
  • Last year, 69 people were injured in 270 crashes throughout the Southern Interior over the Victoria Day long weekend.
  • Last year, 38 people were injured in 140 crashes throughout the North Central region over the Victoria Day long weekend.

​*Victoria Day long weekend is calculated from 18:00 the Friday prior to Victoria Day to midnight Monday. Injured victims and crashes from 2016 ICBC data.​

Media contact

​Lindsay Olsen​
604-982-4759

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