Aviva Canada to launch equine insurance product

Aviva Canada to launch equine insurance product

August 29, 2016 (Toronto, ON) – Aviva Canada is pleased to announce that through their partner, Henry Equestrian Insurance Brokers Ltd. and its well-known and trusted Henry Equestrian Plan (“HEP”), it will be launching in Manitoba and Saskatchewan to provide mortality, medical, and surgical insurance coverage for horses, as well as liability coverage for equestrians.

HEP is now available in Manitoba and Saskatchewan as of today. With the launch of HEP, equine owners in the region now have easy access through their local broker to specialized coverage that meets all of their equestrian insurance needs.

For over 40 years, Henry Equestrian has been designing, managing, and providing insurance expertise for the equestrian industry.

“Whether you ride for pleasure or professionally, HEP offers a wide range of equine coverage tailored to individual needs,” says Daniel Ignoto, Assistant Vice President, Leisure & Lifestyle, Aviva Canada. “We are proud to partner with Henry Equestrian to provide equine insurance for this unique market and continue to protect our customers’ passion for horses.”

“In partnership with Aviva Canada, HEP offers a host of coverage options from full mortality, medical and disability coverage, trailer and equipment protection, to 24/7 claims expert service. HEP will not only fill the gap in insurance coverage for equine owners in Manitoba and Saskatchewan, but also provide added benefits by offering custom options to meet their unique needs,” says Dennis Graham, President, Henry Equestrian Insurance Brokers Ltd.

About Aviva Canada
Aviva Canada is one of the leading property and casualty insurance groups in the country providing home, automobile, leisure/lifestyle and business insurance to more than three million customers. A wholly-owned subsidiary of UK-based Aviva plc, the company has more than 4,000 employees, 27 locations across Canada and approximately 1,500 independent broker partners.

Aviva Canada invests in positive change through the Aviva Community Fund, Canada’s longest running online community funding competition. Since its inception in 2009, the Aviva Community Fund has awarded $6.5 million to over 222 charities and community groups nationwide.

For more information visit avivacanada.com, our blog or our Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn pages.

Media Contact:
Priscilla Wong
Public Relations Specialist
Aviva Canada Inc.
Desk: 416 288 6780
Mobile: 647 208 7523
priscilla_wong@avivacanada.com

BC SPCA reminds public not to leave animals in hot cars

BC SPCA reminds public not to leave animals in hot cars

BC SPCA

With more than 150 calls about animals in hot vehicles already received by the BC SPCA this year, the animal welfare society is again, reminding people to leave their pets at home if they can’t keep them safe.

“People don’t realize just how quickly their cars can become death traps for their pets – it can take as little as 10 minutes for the vehicle to reach temperatures where the animal can suffer irreparable brain damage or death,” says Lorie Chortyk, general manager of community relations for the BC SPCA, noting that the BC SPCA received 1,529 calls about animals in hot vehicles in 2015. “We know that if people are taking their pets with them, it’s because they love them and want to spend time with them, but we really do encourage pet guardians to please, leave their pets at home when they’re going out in the car.”

In just minutes, the temperature in a parked car can climb to well over 38 degrees Celsius (100 degrees Fahrenheit). Dogs have no sweat glands, so they can only cool themselves by panting and by releasing heat through their paws, which they cannot do in a vehicle that has become an oven, she notes. Dogs can withstand high temperatures for only a very short time – in some cases just minutes – before suffering irreparable brain damage or death.

Pet guardians should be alert to heatstroke symptoms, which include: exaggerated panting (or the sudden stopping of panting), rapid or erratic pulse, salivation, anxious or staring expression, weakness and muscle tremors, lack of coordination, convulsions or vomiting, and collapse.

If your dog shows symptoms of heatstroke, you should do the following:

  • Immediately move the animal to a cool, shady place
  • Wet the dog with cool water
  • Fan vigorously to promote evaporation. This will cool the blood, which reduces the animal’s core temperature.
  • Do not apply ice. This constricts blood flow, which will inhibit cooling.
  • Allow the dog to drink some cool water (or to lick ice cream if no water is available)
  • Take the dog to a veterinarian as soon as possible for further treatment.

          “Your dog will be much happier – and safer – at home, with shade and plenty of fresh cool water,” Chortyk says. “It is such a preventable tragedy.”

If people see a dog in a hot car who they think is in distress, they should call municipal animal control authorities or local law enforcement immediately.

The British Columbia Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals is a not-for-profit organization reliant on public donations. Our mission is to protect and enhance the quality of life for domestic, farm and wild animals in B.C.

Economical Insurance to acquire largest pet insurer in Canada

Economical Mutual Insurance Company, one of Canada’s leading property and casualty insurance companies, today announced its intention to acquire Desjardins Group’s pet insurance business, Western Financial Insurance Company (WFIC) and its flagship brand Petsecure.

WFIC is Canada’s largest pet insurance company with net written premiums in 2015 exceeding $50 million. For more than 25 years, it has provided Canadian pet owners with innovative coverage to meet the diverse needs of their pets. WFIC offers comprehensive, veterinarian-recommended coverage for dogs and cats.

“Economical is an insurer with significant momentum right now thanks to our dedicated people, bold strategy, and focus on growth, both organically and by acquisitions,” said Karen Gavan, president and chief executive officer of Economical Insurance. “We are acquiring the market leader in the Canadian pet insurance industry, which will further diversify our business, and we are pleased to welcome WFIC management and employees to the Economical family.”

“For Desjardins, this is the result of an ongoing strategic review of our activities and, as part of this decision, it was important to identify a prospective acquirer that would be in a position to continue growing the business,” said Sylvie Paquette, Desjardins’ Senior Executive Vice President and General Manager of P&C Insurance. “We believe WFIC and its employees will have a promising future under new ownership that will further develop the full potential of the business.”

The transaction is expected to close in the third quarter of 2016 and is subject to customary closing conditions, including receipt of required regulatory approvals. Following the closing, WFIC will remain headquartered in Winnipeg, ensuring consistency of service in maintaining its industry-leading products, sales force, customer experience and relationships with veterinarians, shelters and breeders. Desjardins will continue to distribute WFIC’s pet insurance product through its Desjardins Insurance and The Personal Insurance brands.

About Economical Insurance
Founded in 1871, Economical Insurance is one of Canada’s leading property and casualty insurers, with $2.0 billion in premiums during 2015 and $5.3 billion in assets as at March 31, 2016. Based in Waterloo, this Canadian-owned and operated company services the insurance needs of more than one million customers across the country. Economical Insurance conducts business under the following brands: Economical Insurance, Economical, Western General, Economical Select, Perth Insurance, Sonnet, Family Insurance Solutions and Economical Financial.

About WFIC
WFIC is Canada’s oldest and largest pet insurance provider with 25 years of offering innovative pet insurance to Canadian pet parents. Its core brand, Petsecure has unique pet insurance options to choose from that offer comprehensive coverage to pet owners in Canada. Petsecure also offers dental coverage and special coverage including alternative treatments and behavioural therapy. Petsecure is the only pet health insurance provider in Canada to offer their exclusive Secure For Life™ guarantee. Underwritten by WFIC, Petsecure and logo are registered trademarks of WFIC. Petsecure is a member of the North American Pet Health Insurance Association (NAPHIA).

About Desjardins Group
Desjardins Group is the leading cooperative financial group in Canada and the sixth largest cooperative financial group in the world, with assets of $255.1 billion. It has been rated one of the Best Employers in Canada by Aon Hewitt. To meet the diverse needs of its members and clients, Desjardins offers a full range of products and services to individuals and businesses through its extensive distribution network, online platforms and subsidiaries across Canada. Considered North America’s strongest bank according to Bloomberg News, Desjardins has one of the highest capital ratios and credit ratings in the industry.

For further information, contact:
Doug Maybee
Economical Insurance
(T) 519.570.8249
(C) 519.404.0989
doug.maybee@economical.com

Valérie Lamarre
Desjardins Group
(T) 514.281.7275 or 1.866.866.7000, ext. 5557275
valerie.lamarre@desjardins.com / media@desjardins.com

BC SPCA reminds public not to leave pets in hot cars

With temperatures soaring across British Columbia recently, the BC SPCA is reminding people to leave their pets at home if they can’t keep them safe.

“We can’t stress enough that it can be fatal to leave your pet in a hot car, even for 10 minutes, but still we receive hundreds of calls about animals in distress, every year – in 2015,  it was more than 1,200 calls,” says Lorie Chortyk, general manager of community relations for the BC SPCA. “Doing so is so dangerous for your pet – the temperature in a parked car, even in the shade with windows partly open, can rapidly reach a level that will seriously harm or even kill a pet.”

In just minutes, the temperature in a parked car can climb to well over 38 degrees Celsius (100 degrees Fahrenheit). Dogs have no sweat glands, so they can only cool themselves by panting and by releasing heat through their paws, she notes. Dogs can withstand high temperatures for only a very short time – in some cases just minutes – before suffering irreparable brain damage or death.

Pet guardians should be alert to heatstroke symptoms, which include: exaggerated panting (or the sudden stopping of panting), rapid or erratic pulse, salivation, anxious or staring expression, weakness and muscle tremors, lack of coordination, convulsions or vomiting, and collapse.

If your dog shows symptoms of heatstroke, you should do the following:

  • Immediately move the animal to a cool, shady place
  • Wet the dog with cool water
  • Fan vigorously to promote evaporation. This will cool the blood, which reduces the animal’s core temperature.
  • Do not apply ice. This constricts blood flow, which will inhibit cooling.
  • Allow the dog to drink some cool water (or to lick ice cream if no water is available)
  • Take the dog to a veterinarian as soon as possible for further treatment.

“If you’re used to letting your dog accompany you on errands, you might feel guilty leaving him behind on hot days.  But your dog will be much happier – and safer – at home, with shade and plenty of fresh cool water,” Chortyk says.

If people see a dog in a hot car who they think is in distress, they should call municipal animal control or local law enforcement immediately.

The British Columbia Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals is a not-for-profit organization reliant on public donations. Our mission is to protect and enhance the quality of life for domestic, farm and wild animals in B.C.

Source: BC SPCA

Pethealth Acquires Canadian Pet Insurance Business Pets Plus Us

Pethealth Acquires Canadian Pet Insurance Business Pets Plus Us

Press Release:

OAKVILLE, ON – April 21, 2016 – Pethealth Inc. (“Pethealth”) is proud to announce the acquisition of Pets Plus Us from Royal & Sun Alliance Insurance Company of Canada (“RSA”). The Pets Plus Us business will join the ranks of Pethealth’s offerings in the Canadian pet insurance market, 24PetWatch and Ontario SPCA Pet Insurance Programs.

Pets Plus Us was started by RSA in 2013 with a mission of delivering pet owner happiness in the Canadian pet insurance market. “We’re thrilled to join forces with the talented team of people at Pets Plus Us. We’re confident that, together, we will be able to expand our care of companion animals in Canada,” said Sean Smith, CEO of Pethealth. “We’re pet people too – so adding another

Pets Plus Us was started by RSA in 2013 with a mission of delivering pet owner happiness in the Canadian pet insurance market. “We’re thrilled to join forces with the talented team of people at Pets Plus Us. We’re confident that, together, we will be able to expand our care of companion animals in Canada,” said Sean Smith, CEO of Pethealth. “We’re pet people too – so adding another

We’re confident that, together, we will be able to expand our care of companion animals in Canada,” said Sean Smith, CEO of Pethealth. “We’re pet people too – so adding another organization that furthers our cause is exciting for us all.” The sale is expected to close on May 24, 2016. The leadership, the team and the brand of Pets Plus Us will continue to offer exceptional customer service, this time as part of the Pethealth family. Customers should not experience any disruption of service as

The leadership, the team and the brand of Pets Plus Us will continue to offer exceptional customer service, this time as part of the Pethealth family. Customers should not experience any disruption of service as business will continue as usual following the closing of the transaction.

About Pethealth Inc, a Fairfax company, is the leading provider of management software to North American animal welfare organizations through its cloud-based application. Pethealth is a leading provider of RFID Microchips and Lost Pet Recovery services to the North American companion animal industry. In addition, Pethealth is one of the largest providers of medical insurance for dogs and cats to pet owners, operating in the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom. Pethealth offers a unique range of products and services for shelters, veterinarians and pet owners through a number of wholly-owned subsidiaries.

About Pets Plus Us Pets Plus Us is on a crusade to champion pet owner happiness in Canada, powered by a growing team of passionate pet people with a wide variety of experience, skills and knowledge. The Pets Plus Us brand is equal parts community, membership, and pet insurance coverage, all created to empower and inform responsible pet ownership and pet health.

For further information, contact: Sean Smith, CEO Mike Wallace, President of Insurance Pethealth Inc. 905-842-2615

CBC’s ‘Pets, Vets & Debts’ looks at costs and advances in animal health care

By Victoria Ahearn

THE CANADIAN PRESS

TORONTO _ When it comes to treating an ailing pet, Toronto veterinarian Dr. Michael Ethier is the first to admit it can get expensive.

As director of emergency and critical care medicine at the Toronto Veterinary Emergency Hospital, he’s seen families spend up to $20,000 on their animals.

It may be a hard figure to swallow, but when you break down the costs from a weeks-long stay in an intensive care unit to surgery and perhaps transfusions or MRIs it makes sense, he adds.

With Canada’s publicly funded health-care system, most people don’t realize the exact costs involved in medical treatment, both for humans and animals.

Ethier is hoping the documentary “Pets, Vets & Debts,” making its world premiere on CBC-TV’s “The Nature of Things” on Thursday, will help clear up such misconceptions.

“There’s not a person in veterinary medicine, especially within specialty referral medicine, that will ever say to someone it’s not expensive to treat severely ill or complex pets,” says Ethier, who appears in the doc.

“What we’re hoping is that people understand why it costs more and that sure, in the ideal world we would love that this was similar to human medicine, where there weren’t costs passed on to the family members.”

Liam O’Rinn wrote and directed the film, which looks at the business of veterinary care and the latest medical advancements for animals, from stem cell transplants to heart stents and 3D printed prosthetics.

According to the doc, Canadians collectively spend more than $2.25 billion annually on vet bills. For Americans, that number is $14 billion.

The doc also looks at the cost of pet insurance, which it says most Canadians don’t have.

“Looking into insurance and getting educated on insurance I think is a huge benefit for most families,” says Ethier.

“Unless you’re in a position to be fiscally responsible and put money aside either before you get your first pet or accumulated over the years of the pet and hope that its illness happens later on where you’ve developed that nest egg.”

Ethier notes that having an animal is like buying a house or having children: It’s a long-term commitment with guaranteed costs over its life span.

“You’re not going to get around it,” he says. “It’s a biological entity. There are going to be things that need to be addressed, whether it’s preventatively or therapeutically to fix problems.”

He recommends researching whether the breed of pet has inherent health problems, and if the place it comes from has a history of pet illness.

Pet owners should also understand that health-care costs for pets will differ according to the level of treatment.

For instance, prices are generally higher at a specialty hospital and in situations where an animal needs an emergency surgery at odd hours.

When a pet owner is unable to pay for treatment, they can either have the animal euthanized or surrender it to a local shelter, provided the prognosis is good.

“That’s the biggest frustration for us and for our staff is when we know we can fix an animal, it’s just unfortunately that family doesn’t have the resources to do it,” says Ethier.

“But I’ve even had to say it to clients: ‘My staff would not appreciate if I didn’t pay them for their hard work.’ … Until everything is free, which is never going to happen, there are those costs, unfortunately.”

canada-press

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