Reminder to all Manitoba License Holders

Reminder to all Manitoba License Holders

In March 2020, Manitoba’s Superintendent of Financial Institutions had approved that the requirement for mandatory Continuing Education (CE) reporting for the 2020 licence renewal was to be deferred to May 2021 for all licensed agents, and deferred to June 2021 for all licensed adjusters. This allowed Manitoba licence holders who were required to report CE credits to renew their licences for 2020 without having to complete or report mandatory CE for the 2020 year.

This is an early reminder that licence holders must complete the required number of CE credits for both the 2020 and 2021 years, and report all of these hours prior to licence renewal for 2021.

The Insurance Council of Manitoba (ICM) thanks industry for the positive feedback we received for the 2020 reporting deferral. We commend all stakeholders involved in the renewal process during May and June 2020.

For the 2021 Manitoba licence renewal, if you are required to complete and report CE in Manitoba, the following number of CE credits will be required to be completed and entered into your online portal before being able to renew your licence(s):

• General insurance agents: 16 CE credits completed and reported prior to May 31, 2021;
• Auto Only insurance agents: 8 CE credits completed and reported prior to May 31, 2021;
• Adjusters (N/A to Hail Adjusters): 16 CE credits completed and reported prior to June 30, 2021;
• Life and/or A&S agents: 30 CE credits completed and reported prior to May 31, 2021.

You will be unable to renew your licence(s) in 2021 if you do not complete and report the 2020 CE credit requirements in addition to the 2021 CE credit requirements.

However, as in each year, licence holders who are resident in another Canadian jurisdiction which has mandatory CE requirements are not required to also fulfil the Manitoba annual CE credit criteria.

For more detailed information on CE requirements in Manitoba, please refer to the Continuing Education Info page on the ICM website.

New Licensees as of June 1, 2020 (July 1, 2020 for adjusters) MUST ensure that their CE is accumulated in the 2020/2021 licence year. Refer to this page on the ICM website for additional information.

Examples of CE requirement scenarios for the 2021 year due to the 2020 deferral:

1. Example #1: If a general or adjuster licence holder currently has 4 credit hours applied/reported in the CE system on May 1, 2020, they would be required to obtain and report 12 additional CE credits to renew their licence in May 2021 (June 2021 for adjusters). Each year thereafter, they would be required to obtain the annual CE requirement of 8.

2. Example #2: If a life licence holder currently has 0 credit hours applied/reported in the CE system on May 1, 2020, they would be required to obtain and report 30 CE credits to renew their licence in May 2021. Each year thereafter, they would be required to obtain the annual CE requirement of 15 within their annual licence period (no carry forward).

3. Example #3: If a life licence holder currently has 19.5 credit hours applied/reported in the CE system on May 1, 2020, they would only be required to obtain and report an additional 10.5 CE credits to renew their licence in May 2021. Each year thereafter, they would be required to obtain the annual CE requirement of 15 within their annual licence period (no carry forward).

INSURANCE COUNCIL OF MANITOBA

Change made to insurance for B.C. condo owners amid rising premiums

VICTORIA _ Insurance companies in British Columbia have agreed to end a pricing practice that has been identified as one of the key factors in skyrocketing property insurance premiums for condominiums.

Earlier this year, the B.C. Financial Services Authority said premiums have gone up by 40 per cent on average for a number of reasons.

Finance Minister Selina Robinson says an agreement to end so-called best terms pricing on Jan. 1 is a positive step.

Insuring multi-unit properties in B.C. often sees many insurers submit bids.

Under best terms pricing, the final premium paid by owners is usually based on the highest bid, even if most quotes were lower.

Blair Morrison, CEO of the financial services authority, says the change is an important step for long-term stability in the property insurance market.

Robinson was the housing minister in June when she introduced legislation to change the Strata Property Act and the Financial Institutions Act to bring more transparency to the insurance market.

The Insurance Council of B.C., the regulatory body for insurance agents in the province, says it will work with the industry to address the practice.

Council CEO Janet Sinclair says the change will mean less price volatility.

A financial authority report released in June says price pressures will continue on buildings considered to be higher risk and the insurance market for so-called strata properties was “unhealthy.”

It says insurers were accumulating losses mostly from minor claims, especially for water damage due to poor building maintenance and initial construction.

It says new building construction, building material changes and rising replacement costs have put added strain on the industry’s profitability.

Insurers are also reducing the amount of insurance they offer in B.C. because of excessive exposure to earthquake risk, it says.

More than ever before, Canadians are facing financial risk

As Canada deals with a global pandemic and rising household debt, Goose Insurance warns that most Canadians can’t afford further financial setbacks caused by a life-threatening illness.

VANCOUVER, BCNov. 9, 2020 /CNW/ – Goose Insurance, a new player in the life and health insurance market warns Canadians could be out-of-pocket tens of thousands of dollars while undergoing treatment for any life-threatening illness.

Goose Insurance recently conducted a survey of over 1000 Canadians, yielding some eye-opening results. The company found that less than 5% of respondents have critical illness insurance or cancer insurance and majority of the people wrongly believe that Canada’s health care system covers all costs associated with cancer treatment or any other life-threatening illness. Overwhelmingly, women are under insured in Canada, with over 70% of the women that responded to the survey have never purchased life or critical illness insurance.

According to the Canadian Medical Association Journal, nearly half of Canadians will be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetime. In fact, the CMAJ estimates that 225,000 people will be diagnosed with, and 83,000 people will die from, cancer in 2020 alone.

While Canada’s health care system covers many costs associated with life-threatening medical treatments, many patients still face out-of-pocket expenses while undergoing treatment, including some drugs not covered, childcare, rent or mortgage, and other household bills and responsibilities.  This comes at a time when Canadians are dealing with COVID-19, a global pandemic; whilst battling an all-time high household debt ratio of 176.9% according to Statistics Canada.

So why aren’t Canadians buying life and health insurance? Of those surveyed by Goose, the two most common reasons were accessibility and affordability. Specifically amongst young Canadians aged 25 to 35, over 50% didn’t know where to buy it from and over 70% found it too complicated.

“Goose is tackling the accessibility and affordability of insurance, and addressing the underserved market,” says Dejan Mirkovic, President of Goose Insurance. “We’re offering reasonable coverage limits at affordable prices, and the ability to buy policies in minutes without medical exams or the need to speak to an agent; all on the Goose app.”

Goose Insurance together with Industrial Alliance Financial Group, one of Canada’s largest Insurers, has made insurance accessible and affordable for anyone under 69 with a smartphone. On the Goose mobile app, Canadians simply become eligible by answering a few medical questions and can get up to $50,000 of Life Insurance for as low as $5 a month. Monthly premiums are based on age, gender, and smoking status.

“For decades, Special Markets Solutions (a division of iA Financial Group) has promoted voluntary insurance programs using traditional methods. While these offerings provided valuable coverage, these methods were outdated and time consuming. We are very excited to be partnering with Goose Insurance in offering voluntary products on a revolutionary digital platform.  This will allow the user to have an easy to understand, seamless and instant application experience . The future is now,” said Ed Bender, National VP, Special Markets Solutions at iA Financial Group.

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Established in 2018 and based in Vancouver, British Columbia, Goose Insurance Services takes the confusing parts out of buying insurance and makes it easier than ever to get the right coverage. And it all happens in seconds, from a single app. Goose currently serves British ColumbiaAlbertaSaskatchewanManitobaOntario, Québec, and Nova Scotia in Canada as well as WashingtonOregonIllinoisGeorgiaNew Jersey, and Texas in the US. For more information about Goose, or to download the app, visit www.gooseinsurance.com

SOURCE Goose Insurance Services Inc.

https://www.gooseinsurance.com/en/

U.S. insurance adjusters in Calgary to respond to damaging hail storm

U.S. insurance adjusters in Calgary to respond to damaging hail storm

The excerpted article was written by 

A parking lot outside a hotel in northeast Calgary is full of American licence plates from states like Texas, Florida, Oklahoma, Mississippi, Utah and South Carolina.

CRU Adjusters confirmed to Global News it has hired adjusters from across the continent following the hail storm that pounded the city earlier this month.

About 300 adjusters have come in from outside Alberta, including about 100 from the United States, for a mix of desk and fieldwork.

A CRU executive said it has strict COVID-19 protocols  — employees are to stay in their rooms as much as possible, wear masks when leaving, and practise social distancing at customers’ homes. Customers are contacted by phone and do not come out of the home for exterior inspections. When CRU adjusters have to go into the home, homeowners are advised to stay in different rooms during assessments.

Before being dispatched to Calgary, the adjusters had to answer health, travel and close contact questionnaires for CRU, and are advised to immediately self-isolate if they have any coronavirus-related symptoms and to contact Alberta Health.

The adjusters have been in Calgary for nearly two weeks and have more than six weeks work ahead of them. CRU said they are not planning on bringing any more adjusters to the province.

The adjuster company said they worked with the Insurance Bureau of Canada (IBC) and Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), who deemed these adjusters an essential service and provided them with necessary documentation.

And according to PHAC’s website, the documentation excuses the adjusters from having to self-isolate for 14 days.

Alberta Health said it was unaware of this group of adjusters coming to Calgary, and have begun working with PHAC to monitor the adjusters.

One hotel employee Global News spoke with said they ask out-of-province guests to respect social distancing, and even ask them to skip attending the complimentary breakfast.

In email from General Manager Ryan Ocbina said Element by Westin Calgary Airport follows all provincial and federal public health guidelines and follows a chain-wide commitment to cleanliness during the coronavirus pandemic. Ocbina’s hotels also provide complimentary masks and have removed all high-contact areas like self-serve coffee.

In an emailed statement, IBC confirmed it does help insurance companies “gain approval from relevant authorities to bring adjusters in from outside jurisdictions to assist consumers in response to catastrophic events, if required.

“Insurers are utilizing as many in-house and local claims representatives as possible to manage the high volume of claims from this event.”

But most insurance companies Global News spoke with confirmed they are using local adjusters.

“We can confirm that the vast majority of insurers have been using Canadian adjusters,” the ICB statement said.

“Some insurers utilize third-party independent catastrophic adjusting firms during catastrophic events to ensure clients get help as quickly as possible.”

Insurance in Canada: Coronavirus (COVID-19) Sector Impact

Insurance in Canada: Coronavirus (COVID-19) Sector Impact

NEW YORKMay 4, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Insurance in Canada: Coronavirus (COVID-19) Sector Impact

Summary

Read the full report: https://www.reportlinker.com/p05890931/?utm_source=PRN

‘Insurance in Canada: Coronavirus (COVID-19) Sector Impact’ report provides brief review of the key trends and evolving developments that shape the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak in the Canadian insurance industry.

‘Insurance in Canada: Coronavirus (COVID-19) Sector Impact’ report provides a snapshot of the impact on the Canadian insurance industry in light of the COVID-19 outbreak.

It provides the impact of COVID-19 on the Canadian economy, the key business lines impacted by the virus outbreak and the revised market sizing estimates against pre-COVID-19 forecast period (2019-2023) across business segments of life and general insurance.

The report brings together research, modeling and analysis expertise, giving insurers access to information on segment dynamics in the country.

Key Highlights
– Economic Impact.
– Impact of COVID-19 outbreak in the Canadian insurance industry.
– Key measures undertaken at both policy and regulatory level.

Scope
This report provides a comprehensive analysis of the impact of COVID-19 in the Insurance Industry in Canada –
– It provides historical values for the Canadian insurance industry for the report’s 2015-2019 review period, and pre-covid-19 projected and revised projected figures for the 2019-2023 forecast period.
– It offers an impact analysis of the key categories due to the COVID-19 outbreak in the Canadian insurance industry, and market forecasts and revised forecasts to 2023.

Reasons to Buy
– Make strategic business decisions using in-depth historic and forecast market data related to the Canadian insurance industry, and each category within it.
– Understand the key dynamics, trends and growth opportunities in the Canadian insurance industry.
– Identify growth opportunities in key product categories.

Read the full report: https://www.reportlinker.com/p05890931/?utm_source=PRN

About Reportlinker
ReportLinker is an award-winning market research solution. Reportlinker finds and organizes the latest industry data so you get all the market research you need – instantly, in one place.

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Related Links

www.reportlinker.com

New Course from ILScorp:  Fair Treatment of Customers

New Course from ILScorp: Fair Treatment of Customers

The New Guidance Lesson1

This course has been created using the document Guidance: Conduct of Insurance Business and Fair Treatment of Customers issued by the Canadian Council of Insurance Regulators (CCIR) and the Canadian Insurance Services Regulatory Organizations (CISRO).

The New Guidance: Lesson 1 addresses the creation of the Guidance document, its purpose and scope, as well as an explanation of the document’s impact on five key areas of the industry’s activity. The course includes quizzes that allow participants to assess their understanding of the course material.

Course Content

  • Includes the following topics:
  • Definitions of terminology used in the Guidance document
  • The issuing organizations (CCIR and CCRRA)
  • The purpose and origins of the Guidance document
  • Scope of the expectations
  • Implications for conduct of business
  • Implications for fair treatment of customers
  • Implications for business culture
  • Implications for relationships between Insurers and Intermediaries
  • Implications for relationships with Regulatory Authorities

 

The New Guidance Lesson  2

This is the second section of The New Guidance Course which deals with the joint release by the Canadian Council of Insurance Regulators (CCIR) and the Canadian Insurance Services Regulatory Organizations (CISRO) concerning the conduct of insurance business and fair treatment of customers. Part 1 of the course dealt with the creation of the document, its purpose and scope, as well as aspects of the insurance business discussed in the document.

Lesson of the course deals with the Customer Outcomes the industry hopes to achieve, as well as the specific attitudes and practices on the part of industry representatives which will accomplish these goals. There are twelve distinct outcomes articulated and for each of these outcomes there are behaviors which can be observed and monitored.

There are quizzes provided which will assist participants in checking their understanding of the material.

Course Content:

Topics covered in the course include the following areas of customer outcomes and the expectations for the conduct of representatives in each:

  • Governance and Business Culture
  • Conflicts of Interest
  • Outsourcing
  • Design of Insurance Product
  • Distribution Strategies
  • Disclosure to Customer
  • Product Promotion
  • Advice
  • Disclosure to Policyholder
  • Claims Handling and Settlement
  • Complaints Handling and Dispute Resolution
  • Protection of Personal Information

 

Learning Objectives:

Successful participants of the course will:

  • Understand that overall responsibility for fair treatment of Customers is at the level of the board and/or senior management, who design, approve, implement and monitor adherence to policies and procedures aimed at ensuring that Customers are treated fairly.
  • See the importance of relevant staff being trained to deliver appropriate outcomes in terms of fair treatment of Customers.
  • Be aware of the role played by remuneration, reward strategies and evaluation in achieving fair treatment of Customers.
  • Know the areas of risk for potential conflicts of interest as Intermediaries interact with both Customers and Insurers
  • Understand issues around responsibility and monitoring of outsourcing
  • Gain a heightened sense of the factors at play in relationships between Insurers and Intermediaries
  • Become knowledgeable about the ethical issues around product design
  • Understand the importance of representatives having adequate product knowledge in order to enable customers to make an informed decision about the proposed product.
  • Be clear about the limitations and responsibilities around providing various types of “advice” to customers
  • Be knowledgeable about issues surrounding disclosure of information in terms of changes in the policy or the customer’s needs.
  • Be aware of the expectations for representatives to handle claims settlement according to all the best practices listed in the guidance document with regard to fair treatment of customers
  • Be knowledgeable about the expectations for representatives in their handling of complaints and dispute resolution
  • Be familiar with the Guidance document’s creation and purpose.
  • Possess the vocabulary, the understanding and the knowledge-base for explaining and discussing the issues addressed in the Guidance document.

 

More Info on Course

This course is accredited for 2 Continuing Education Hours in the following categories and provinces:

2 General / Adjuster – Technical CE: BC, SK, MB

2 Life / A&S – Technical CE: BC, SK, MB, ON

 

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